Question for you computer geeks

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Annika1980, Dec 26, 2007.

  1. Annika1980

    George Kerby Guest

    Tounge was firmly implanted. To be 'green' I always say "paper" at the
    grocery store - that plastic crap has all my stuff all over the back end of
    my Hydrocarbon-Powered EcoVehicle H2 by the time I get back to my palatial
    estate.
     
    George Kerby, Jan 2, 2008
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  2. Annika1980

    Pudentame Guest

    Actually, it's kind of a mixed situation. It's true we do farm softwoods
    extensively in the U.S.; OTOH, we're at the same time devastating old
    growth hardwoods world-wide.

    On balance, it'd be a good idea to try to preserve some of those old
    growth forests, and substitute farm grown trees where-ever possible.
     
    Pudentame, Jan 2, 2008
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  3. Annika1980

    Mr. Strat Guest

    Is what they do in other countries our concern?
    I live 35 miles from the Olympic National Forest, and I can assure you
    that there is no logging going on there...or in any other national
    park. It's against the law. But, at least the spotted owls have room to
    breed.
     
    Mr. Strat, Jan 2, 2008
  4. NATIONAL FOREST TIMBER FOR SALE
    OLYMPIC NATIONAL FOREST

    The Big Shrew South Sale is located within T22N,
    R10W, Sec 10,11,13,14,15,22,23. The Forest Service
    will receive sealed bids in public at Pacific Ranger
    District, Quinault Office, 353 South Shore Road,
    Quinault, WA 98575 at 10:00 AM local time on
    09/18/2007 for an estimated volume of 6626 ton of
    Douglas-fir sawtimber, 17911 ton of Western Hemlock
    and Other Coniferous Species sawtimber, and 860 ton
    of Red Alder sawtimber marked or otherwise designated
    for cutting. ...

    http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic/timbersales/documents/shrew/ad1.pdf

    Randall doesn't even know where he lives.
    The Olympic National Forest is not a National Park. The
    Olympic National Park, a *very* different entity, is 95%
    designated "Wilderness Area".
    But of course you actually live near the Olympic
    National Park, where logging is not permitted (something
    like 95% of the park is designated as a Wilderness
    Area).
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jan 3, 2008
  5. Annika1980

    John Navas Guest

    The only real difference in design is that some (not all) 2.5" drives
    are designed for higher shock loads. Start-stop cycles are the same.
     
    John Navas, Jan 3, 2008
  6. Annika1980

    John Navas Guest

    What makes you think the data degrades? In the absence of a strong
    magnetic field, that shouldn't be a real issue. (If it was, then
    embedded data servos would be failing right and left, and they aren't.)
    I'm afraid that's not true.
     
    John Navas, Jan 3, 2008
  7. Annika1980

    Mr. Strat Guest

    I was not aware of any logging up that way with the possible exception
    of salvaging the blowdown from last month's wind/rain storm.
     
    Mr. Strat, Jan 3, 2008
  8. Because you don't even seem to know where you live.

    Not to mention not knowing which is a National Park and
    which is a National Forest.
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jan 3, 2008
  9. Annika1980

    Mr. Strat Guest

    I have more important things to concern myself with.
     
    Mr. Strat, Jan 3, 2008
  10. Yes, I noticed that you are still trying to understand
    the photography technology you discovered 30 years ago.

    Keep at it, you'll get it...
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Jan 3, 2008
  11. Seconded.Although magnetic recordings are erasable, they are considered
    permanent.That's the reason in eg mini dv cassetes there is an erasure
    protection tab, just in case you would keep it....\
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Jan 4, 2008
  12. [A complimentary Cc of this posting was sent to
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    ??? I never had good luck with more than 5-years-old floppies. (I
    know that some people claim radically different experience.)

    Hope this helps,
    Ilya
     
    Ilya Zakharevich, Jan 4, 2008
  13. Yeah, floppies were notorious for this.Common audio cassetes, though, can
    last more than 30 years...And the original open reel recordings, of say, a
    Beetles album last until today...VHS cassetes, too, can last for decades.
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Jan 5, 2008
  14. Tzortzakakis Dimitrios wrote:
    []
    You have never had any problems with print-through?

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jan 5, 2008
  15. Depends what you mean by "last". Serious tape archivists run a
    schedule of periodic reversals to minimise the inevitable
    print-through, for example.
     
    Chris Malcolm, Jan 5, 2008
  16. Ok, I give up, nothing lasts forever;-)
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Jan 6, 2008
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