Question for you computer geeks

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Annika1980, Dec 26, 2007.

  1. Annika1980

    Scott W Guest

    Punch cards are the way to go, they last a good long time.

    I have used 219GB of storage for my raw file for 2007, so this would
    be around 2,737,500,000 cards to store this years photos on. Each
    card is 0.007 inches thick, so this is a stack of cards of about
    1,600,000 feet high, or about 300 miles, oh dear I am going to need a
    lot of shoe boxes it would seem

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Dec 31, 2007
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  2. Annika1980

    -hh Guest

    Someone else who has read "Silicon Snake Oil", I see :)


    Use them to insulate your house :)


    -hh
     
    -hh, Dec 31, 2007
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  3. Annika1980

    Pudentame Guest

    The *REAL* big data centers have backup generators - BIG backup
    generators (PLURAL); generators that are exercised regularly to make
    sure they're ready to come on line at need.

    Power outages don't even make the overhead lights flicker.

    The UPS is in case a breaker trips.
     
    Pudentame, Dec 31, 2007
  4. Annika1980

    Pudentame Guest

    Still shouldn't be a problem as long as you don't bury the cabinet under
    a ton of office/cleaning supplies. A closet in and of itself ain't a bad
    idea, especially if it keeps it where the office idiot can't easily poke
    at it.
     
    Pudentame, Dec 31, 2007
  5. Annika1980

    Pudentame Guest

    Not to worry.

    Between the cost of cards & and the time you'll have to spend on eBay
    tracking them down, you won't have time or money for photography anyway,
    so your output will reduce itself to where you'll only need to add
    another 10ft x 10ft x 10 ft storage shed per year to keep up.

    Probably could do even better using data compression; just chuck ever
    10th card or so into the round file.
     
    Pudentame, Dec 31, 2007
  6. Not to worry. President Da Silva of Brazil has a couple of hundred acres of
    rain forest reserved for you.
     
    William Graham, Jan 1, 2008
  7. Annika1980

    Scott W Guest

    Buy my approach is good for the environment, all of those cards are
    sequestering a huge amount of carbon and therefor reducing the amount
    of CO2 in the atmosphere. In this way I not only save my photos, I
    also save the planet at the same time.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Jan 1, 2008
  8. Scott wrote on Mon, 31 Dec 2007 16:05:06 -0800 (PST):

    SW> On Dec 31, 1:56 pm, Pudentame <>
    wrote:
    ??>> Scott W wrote:
    ??>>
    ??>>> Punch cards are the way to go, they last a good long
    ??>>> time.
    ??>>
    ??>>> I have used 219GB of storage for my raw file for 2007, so
    ??>>> this would be around 2,737,500,000 cards to store this
    ??>>> years photos on. Each card is 0.007 inches thick, so
    ??>>> this is a stack of cards of about 1,600,000 feet high, or
    ??>>> about 300 miles, oh dear I am going to need a lot of shoe
    ??>>> boxes it would seem
    ??>>
    ??>>> Scott
    ??>>
    ??>> Not to worry.
    ??>>
    ??>> Between the cost of cards & and the time you'll have to
    ??>> spend on eBay tracking them down, you won't have time or
    ??>> money for photography anyway, so your output will reduce
    ??>> itself to where you'll only need to add another 10ft x
    ??>> 10ft x 10 ft storage shed per year to keep up.
    ??>>
    ??>> Probably could do even better using data compression; just
    ??>> chuck ever 10th card or so into the round file.

    SW> Buy my approach is good for the environment, all of those
    SW> cards are sequestering a huge amount of carbon and therefor
    SW> reducing the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere. In this way
    SW> I not only save my photos, I also save the planet at the
    SW> same time.

    Apart from fire, insects etc, you could achieve a higher density
    with a printed 2-d bar code but I don't really know what the bit
    density would be. Have a look at your junk mail to see the 2-d
    barcodes used by the Post Office but they can be printed much
    smaller. There's a Wikipedia illustration of such codes for
    Dolby sound on 35mm film but I'd not want to use film.


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    E-mail, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
     
    James Silverton, Jan 1, 2008
  9. Depending on how critical the server farm is they might exercise a generator
    weekly. Nothing makes a sweeter sound than a 400KW three-phase Bi-Turbo
    Koehler.
    WRONG! Even the best automatic transfer switches have a delay of a few
    milliseconds before starting the generator. If your lights are on the UPS
    you won't see the flicker.
    TOTALLY CLUELESS! The UPS is on 24/7/365 monitoring and conditioning the
    power should there be any parameter out of tolerance. This is all the
    behind the scene activity you *DON'T* see if everything is working properly.





    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 1, 2008
  10. Annika1980

    Ken Hart Guest

    What about punched paper tape? I've got some punched paper tapes from
    college back in the '70's and they show no signs of deteriorating. Anybody
    got a Digital PDP-8 and an ASR-33 teletype to run them on?
     
    Ken Hart, Jan 1, 2008
  11. Annika1980

    ray Guest

    To store a few hundred GB will be a major headache due to sheer volume.
     
    ray, Jan 1, 2008
  12. Annika1980

    Scott W Guest

    http://www.decitek.com/trseries.html

    Looks like a simple RS232 interface.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Jan 1, 2008
  13. Annika1980

    Walter Banks Guest

    Last summer it took me a couple months to find someone with a functioning
    paper tape reader that was attached to a semi-functional computer that could
    put the data into a form we could read electronically so we could recover
    some very old backup's

    It's getting harder to read paper tape. A friend in the US army offered to
    read
    some old DECtapes for me on some of the PDP11's they use..

    w..
     
    Walter Banks, Jan 1, 2008
  14. Annika1980

    George Kerby Guest

    Save a tree! Save a forest!
     
    George Kerby, Jan 1, 2008
  15. Annika1980

    Paul Furman Guest

    Wow, they still sell punched paper readers! Actually it wasn't *that*
    long ago that they were in use: about 20 years ago I used that
    technology in college to do a little simple programming to draw circles
    & lines with a graphics program making an animation, printed out in full
    dot matrix glory. Cutting edge stuff.
     
    Paul Furman, Jan 1, 2008
  16. Annika1980

    Allen Guest

    Back in 1961 or 1962 the bank I worked for installed its first computer
    system--an IBM 1401 with no mag tape or disk I/O, only punchcards.
    Processing for my bank and a smaller one, plus several billing systems
    for some local customers, we used 1,500,000 cards per month--18,000,000
    per year. The computer room was ringed with card files and we had one
    full-time person who did nothing but move new cards in and old ones out.
    This system was a vast improvement over the manual operations it
    replaced, but we were all overjoyed when it out out the door in 1966 and
    was replaced with an IBM 360/30, with 3 disk drives, each with a
    capacity of 7.5 megabytes (NOT gigabytes) which were removable. Cards
    were great for the 1890 census, which Hollerith developed them for, but
    that was then and this is now, so to speak. Some time in the 1960s IBM
    also introduced its System/3, which used punchcards a third the size of
    the 80-column cards, but containing 120 data positions. When IBM went
    into the ATM business they used that small cardstock to print receipts
    on. Useless historical fact: the 80-column cards were the same size as
    the old saddleblanket US currency (RIP 19333), and for that 1890 census
    the government had plenty equipment for cuttin paper to that
    size.Incidentally, we were very careful and lucky, as only one time did
    a set of data cards get dropped and shuffled, necessitating a long
    re-sort. Coming soon: the history of storing data on cuneiform tablets,
    some of which have survived thousands of years (hey, hard disc
    enthusiasts--can you top that?)
    Allen
     
    Allen, Jan 1, 2008
  17. Annika1980

    Pudentame Guest

    Hmmmm? Too bad there's no way to store data in all the plastic bags I
    get whenever I have to buy something.
     
    Pudentame, Jan 2, 2008
  18. Annika1980

    Pudentame Guest

    Back when I was in high school, one of my friend's dad worked as a
    computer operator/programmer for a major tobacco company; managing
    inventories and all that I suppose.

    Just for grins 'n giggles, he wrote a program that took advantage of the
    different noises the individual letters made on the line printer so it
    would play "Turkey in the Straw".
     
    Pudentame, Jan 2, 2008
  19. Annika1980

    Paul Furman Guest

    The whole point of using hard drives is to do periodic backups. I
    wouldn't use a HD to put in storage. Hundreds of gigs takes a long time
    to back up on a hard drive and I'm not aware of anything else that's
    faster. Plus it's flexible: you can plug the drive into any computer,
    you can browse the data set easily to find what you want. Get 2 drives &
    if one fails get another and there's no down time. Portable USB drives
    are easy to take to a separate location or at least unplug to separate
    from whatever virus or electrical surge problem. CDs, even Blu-Ray or
    whatever are a pain to burn and you need to label each one somehow then
    sort through the stack to find a particular file & a HD is so much
    easier. I keep originals, raw files, layered PSDs, TIFFs & culled out
    seconds on a pair of external drives and only the final high quality
    jpegs on my C: drive.
     
    Paul Furman, Jan 2, 2008
  20. Annika1980

    Mr. Strat Guest

    I was hoping he was kidding about saving trees. Unlike what you hear
    from Algore and the greener types, we can (and do) grow more trees.
    They're just another crop like wheat except that they take longer to
    grow.
     
    Mr. Strat, Jan 2, 2008
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