public key encryption

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Nick Worley, Aug 15, 2003.

  1. Nick Worley

    Nick Worley Guest

    Could someone explain to me in simple layperson's terms how "public key
    encryption" works?
    I saw a programme yesterday about the history of codes and ciphers & this
    programme claimed that public key encryption is as good as undecipherable,
    or at least for the time being.
    How exactly does it work?
    Thanks
    Nick
    PS I'm not totally computer illiterate, but if any explanation starts
    getting too technical it'll probably go over my head, so possible analogies
    to help explain it would be helpful.
     
    Nick Worley, Aug 15, 2003
    #1
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  2. X-No-Archive: Yes

    In Brian H¹© <> typed
    || X-No-Archive: Yes
    || Nick Worley said:
    ||
    ||| Could someone explain to me in simple layperson's terms how "public
    ||| key encryption" works?
    ||| I saw a programme yesterday about the history of codes and ciphers
    ||| & this programme claimed that public key encryption is as good as
    ||| undecipherable, or at least for the time being.
    ||| How exactly does it work?
    ||
    || If someone told you exactly how it worked, it would no longer be
    || undecipherable would it?

    Showing your naivety again, Brian.

    It's common knowlege *how* it works.

    http://tinyurl.com/k64u
     
    Robert de Brus, Aug 16, 2003
    #2
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  3. Nick Worley

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Robert de Brus said:
    I was wondering who was going to be the first to bite.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 16, 2003
    #3
  4. X-No-Archive: Yes

    In Brian H¹© <> typed
    || X-No-Archive: Yes
    || Robert de Brus said:
    ||
    ||| X-No-Archive: Yes
    |||
    ||| In ||| Brian H¹© <> typed
    ||||| X-No-Archive: Yes
    ||||| Nick Worley said:
    |||||
    |||||| Could someone explain to me in simple layperson's terms how
    |||||| "public key encryption" works?
    |||||| I saw a programme yesterday about the history of codes and
    |||||| ciphers & this programme claimed that public key encryption is
    |||||| as good as undecipherable, or at least for the time being.
    |||||| How exactly does it work?
    |||||
    ||||| If someone told you exactly how it worked, it would no longer be
    ||||| undecipherable would it?
    |||
    ||| Showing your naivety again, Brian.
    |||
    ||| It's common knowlege *how* it works.
    |||
    ||| http://tinyurl.com/k64u
    |||
    ||
    || I was wondering who was going to be the first to bite.

    bullshit! you're an idiot, plain and simple.

    You always try and squirm out of your blunders by pleading 'intentional
    bait'

    stop being such an idiot.
     
    Robert de Brus, Aug 16, 2003
    #4
  5. Nick Worley

    Brian H¹© Guest

    X-No-Archive: Yes
    Robert de Brus said:
    Yeah yeah yeah, keep nibbling.
     
    Brian H¹©, Aug 16, 2003
    #5
  6. You have been trolled.
     
    Phineas P. Hornswaggle, Aug 16, 2003
    #6
  7. Nick Worley

    Nick Worley Guest

    Thanks for your replies and the URLs, although I must admit a lot of the
    maths went over my head.
    I suppose what I'm looking for is a non-maths explanation as to how the
    public and private keys work, so I can at least understand the principles of
    how they work, even if I don't actually understand the maths behind them.
    For example I understand in broad terms how the German Enigma encoding
    machines worked in WWII (with their multiple rotors and complex wiring),
    although I wouldn't have a clue how to build or decode one.
    Thanks again
    Nick
     
    Nick Worley, Aug 16, 2003
    #7
  8. Nick Worley

    °Mike° Guest

    From the first link I gave you:

    "A cryptographic system that uses two keys -- a public key known to
    everyone and a private or secret key known only to the recipient of
    the message. When John wants to send a secure message to Jane,
    he uses Jane's public key to encrypt the message. Jane then uses
    her private key to decrypt it.

    An important element to the public key system is that the public and
    private keys are related in such a way that only the public key can be
    used to encrypt messages and only the corresponding private key can
    be used to decrypt them. Moreover, it is virtually impossible to deduce
    the private key if you know the public key."

    You can't get more "non-maths explanation" than that.
     
    °Mike°, Aug 16, 2003
    #8
  9. Nick Worley

    Jimchip Guest

    The bottom line is that it much easier to multiply 2 known, large
    integers in order to obtain a third that is then used in the encryption
    algorithm than it is to divide a large integer knowing only one partial
    factor. The encryption algorithm is not solely multiplicative and the
    missing (private) key is so large that it takes a long time to guess it-
    Too long to expect someone to want to spend the time.
     
    Jimchip, Aug 16, 2003
    #9
  10. Nick Worley

    jeroen Guest

    check the signature and PGP section here: http://www.pki-page.org/#OTHER

    Understanding pki depends more on your math and logic capability than
    any computer skills.
     
    jeroen, Aug 16, 2003
    #10
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