Printed photo life length...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by PR, Sep 17, 2003.

  1. PR

    PR Guest

    I started an experiment last year. Hanging up in my office
    is an A4 sheet with three identical photos arranged on it,
    one above the other.

    The top photo is exposed to the light directly.

    The middle photo is exposed to light through clear plastic,
    the sort I use to make my photo albums.

    The bottom photo is covered by thick cardboard.

    I want to see, over the years, how the colors are retained.

    After a year there is no visible difference, though of course
    they may all be fading at the same rate!

    My albums are even better preserved, in dark cupboards most
    of the time.

    Has anyone any concrete data about how long photos printed
    with (for example) the Epson 1290 last.
     
    PR, Sep 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. PR

    Frankhartx Guest

    From: (PR)
    Comr back in twenty years and we will have some REAL data for you.
     
    Frankhartx, Sep 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. PR

    Tom Monego Guest

    This is the THE QUESTION about digital. If you use Epson's ColorLife paper
    they say 25 years, under glass. A photo alblum kept in the dark maybe longer,
    but then you have to factor in the paper and sleeve material in the alblum.
    This time varies with each paper/ink combination. For your printer,the data
    I've seen goes from 6months (Epson Prem. Luster) to 25 yrs (Colorlife). Much
    of the papers now are made for the pigment ink printers, so those of use who
    use dyes have to watch carefully. But using the same criteria standard photo
    paper has a life of 13-20years, Fuji does make one with a life expectancy of
    over 60 years, but you have to find a lab that uses this paper.

    Henry Wilhelm has done this work for years and has seemingly hard data. His
    techniques are now being questioned because he relies on light intensity alone
    , and has said there isn't a good way to do excellerated testing factoring in
    UV and infrared light as well as varied enviromental factors such as humidity.
    But he has the most experience in this field, and the most hard data. He also
    works mostly for the big guys Epson and HP are big clients. HW is well known
    in the inkjet industry and is considered to be an honest player.


    Tom
     
    Tom Monego, Sep 17, 2003
    #3
  4. PR

    Bill Hilton Guest

    From: (PR)
    http://www.inkjetart.com/news/longevity/index.html (1280 is the same as your
    1290)

    These are projections based on accelerated testing, so are subject to many
    variables and reciprocity factors, but are as good a guess as you'll find.
    IIRC the projected life of the other Epson papers with this printer were pretty
    short, 6 months for Glossy Film and 2 years for Photo Paper.
     
    Bill Hilton, Sep 17, 2003
    #4
  5. PR

    Mikey Guest

    It would be nice to know just how long ink jet prints will last, but until
    we find out for sure, at least with digital, one can always make another
    print 100% exactly the same as the original as long as the file is archived
    someplace. With film the negatives deteriorate too and might be useless in
    the future but digital files can be saved and copied infinitely with no loss
    or changes. So if we find that all our inkjet prints are fading away in 5
    years, we can print them again, hopefully on some new longer lasting process
    the second time.

    Of course now the fight on how to properly archive digital images will start
    all over again.. <g>
     
    Mikey, Sep 17, 2003
    #5
  6. PR

    Eric Gisin Guest

    Put them outside protected from rain. That will greatly accelerate light
    fading.

    | I started an experiment last year. Hanging up in my office
    | is an A4 sheet with three identical photos arranged on it,
    | one above the other.
    |
     
    Eric Gisin, Sep 17, 2003
    #6
  7. PR

    Frankhartx Guest

    rom: (Tom Monego)
    Only time will tell
     
    Frankhartx, Sep 17, 2003
    #7
  8. PR

    George Kerby Guest

    Yeah, that's where I display ALL my photographs.
    What a moron from the Great White North.
    Oh, I forgot that in the trailer park, the inhabitants like to "bring the
    indoors out", not the usual customary other way!
    BAHAHAHAHAHAHAW!


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    George Kerby, Sep 17, 2003
    #8
  9. PR

    Eric Gisin Guest

    Look what years of crack have done to your brain, Kerby.

    Accelerated testing like this is used by the industry. They just use artifical
    UV.

    | On 9/17/03 10:53 AM, in article , "Eric Gisin"
    |
    | > Put them outside protected from rain. That will greatly accelerate light
    | > fading.
    | >
    | > | > | I started an experiment last year. Hanging up in my office
    | > | is an A4 sheet with three identical photos arranged on it,
    | > | one above the other.
    | >
    | Yeah, that's where I display ALL my photographs.
    | What a moron from the Great White North.
    | Oh, I forgot that in the trailer park, the inhabitants like to "bring the
    | indoors out", not the usual customary other way!
    | BAHAHAHAHAHAHAW!
     
    Eric Gisin, Sep 17, 2003
    #9
  10. Marvin Margoshes, Sep 17, 2003
    #10
  11. PR

    George Kerby Guest

    Geez Jizz.
    I didn't know you were with Underwriter's Laboratry!
    In THAT case why shouldn't he just buy a tanning bed and stick them in
    there.
    He was testing under "normal" conditions.
    Leave the real testing to the experts, Mr. Heloise.


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    George Kerby, Sep 17, 2003
    #11
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