Pictures on CRT too dark

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by born2run1701, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. born2run1701

    born2run1701 Guest

    I took pictures on a Nikon D70 and they look perfect on the camera LCD.
    However when I open them on the Samsung 900NF CRT monitor, they are way
    too dark. I calibrated the monitor with the Samsung Natural Color
    software and Adobe Gamma (that comes with Photoshop Elements 3) but it
    doesn't help. If I turn the brightness and contrast way up, the
    pictures are bright but the color is too faint. Is my monitor having a
    problem or my calibartion is way off? Or is it common that the camera
    LCD is much brighter than a monitor? I would suppose that the camera
    LCD is more accurate, otherwise what's the point of having it on the
    camera.

    TS
     
    born2run1701, Aug 2, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. born2run1701

    Proteus Guest

    How old is your CRT monitor? Maybe it is burning out, happened to me once,
    and then the brightness and colors and contrast are not accurate at all.
    Check your digital images on a new monitor, a friend's, etc.
     
    Proteus, Aug 2, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. born2run1701

    Jim Guest

    What does the histogram for each shot show?
    Jim-
     
    Jim, Aug 2, 2005
    #3
  4. born2run1701

    Roy Guest

    I also find that what appears on the LCD is quite different from what the
    picture looks like when imported. However I am mostly shooting in RAW, so
    I just assumed that the camera was applying some "Corrections" for the LCD.
    The image then gets corrected by me during the RAW conversion, so I am not
    too bothered, provided the In Camera Histogram was Ok.

    I am a little worried that your calibration is incorrect, if you are using
    both Adobe Gamma and the Samsung Correction.

    I know that if you were using a hardware calibrator, like a Spyder, you
    would need to remove Adobe Gamma from the start up Folder to prevent it from
    interfering with the Spyder profile, and "Correcting" an already correct
    Profile.

    Roy G
     
    Roy, Aug 2, 2005
    #4
  5. born2run1701

    JohnR66 Guest

    I have a monitor like that. The desktop and applications look fine, but
    photos are very dark. I played with the brightness and contrast on the
    monitor and with the driver including the gamma correction. I can never get
    a happy balance. On other monitors, no problem.
    John
     
    JohnR66, Aug 3, 2005
    #5
  6. born2run1701

    Hunt Guest

    First, another question: does your printer give you what your calibrated CRT
    monitor shows? If not, then you need to re-do the calibration, as something is
    amiss. As others have stated, it could simply be that you are using two tools,
    designed to basically do the same thing. My high-end laptop's LCD shows images
    about +1/f brighter, than do the CRT's. That is why I only do basic work on
    it, then final work on the workstation in the office, whether I am printing,
    or sending the work out. All CMYK conversion is done there, as well.

    As for the LCD on the D70, mine shows images "brighter" than they appear on my
    dual 21" calibrated monitors. I correct on the monitors, as they match my
    Epson printers. The LCD, depending on the ambient light, the viewing angle,
    and several other variables, might be way off. As others have asked, how does
    the histogram look?

    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Aug 3, 2005
    #6
  7. born2run1701

    Vince Guest

    Ok guys. what you see on your camera's LCD Display is always at least 5 to
    10% brighter or darker. the LCD Display is design to always show you a
    perfect photo. so to have an idea what the photo look like is to tilt the
    camera just a bit. try it and see it works for me.

    Vince....


    I took pictures on a Nikon D70 and they look perfect on the camera LCD.
    However when I open them on the Samsung 900NF CRT monitor, they are way
    too dark. I calibrated the monitor with the Samsung Natural Color
    software and Adobe Gamma (that comes with Photoshop Elements 3) but it
    doesn't help. If I turn the brightness and contrast way up, the
    pictures are bright but the color is too faint. Is my monitor having a
    problem or my calibartion is way off? Or is it common that the camera
    LCD is much brighter than a monitor? I would suppose that the camera
    LCD is more accurate, otherwise what's the point of having it on the
    camera.

    TS
     
    Vince, Aug 3, 2005
    #7
  8. born2run1701

    born2run1701 Guest

    Well I did not calibrate using both the Samsung and Adobe at the same
    time but individually at different times. Thus I don't think it is the
    main problem though it is a possibility. Should I uninstall one of
    them?

    The problem should have nothing to do with shooting in RAW or JPEG as
    they are both too dark on the monitor. I checked the histograms and
    they show that the pictures are indeed too dark. So the camera is
    indeed lying to make pictures look bright. However I am also concerned
    when Proteus and John said that the monitor may have problems. I will
    definitely try to load the pictures on some other monitors.

    I don't print the pictures myself. Is that a definite test for monitor
    accuracy? I read that an image can contain data, something to do with
    CYMK, so the printed picture has the exact colors. Is inserting the
    CYMK or any other color data an post-processing step? Do most photo
    print shop use that data?
     
    born2run1701, Aug 3, 2005
    #8
  9. born2run1701

    Marvin Guest

    I also calibrated my Samsung monitor with their software, and my photos look somewhat dark
    right out of the camera. I calibrated my printer to print closely to what I see on the
    monitor, and I adjust the photos in Paint Shop Pro to look how I want them to be before I
    make prints. I could set my Olympus camera to take pictures a little lighter, but I
    haven't bothered.

    The pictures also have more color saturation than I like, but I guess that is what most
    folks want.
     
    Marvin, Aug 3, 2005
    #9
  10. born2run1701

    Jim Guest

    Your camera is underexposing the images.
    The images contain RGB data. All monitors work in RGB mode. All printers
    work in CMYK mode. When you send a file to be printed, the information must
    be converted from RGB to CMYK.
    Jim
     
    Jim, Aug 3, 2005
    #10
  11. born2run1701

    Steve Dell Guest

    You will need to calibrate your monitor before you do anything serious.

    Adobe Gamma really doesn't get it done. I've had similar issues. I bought a
    "ColorVision" Spyder and it works fine. You should be able to find one on
    eBay now since the Spyder II, "new and improved," is now out.

    Steve
    Tucson
     
    Steve Dell, Aug 4, 2005
    #11
  12. born2run1701

    Hunt Guest

    The main purpose of calibration (this should be done on your entire workflow,
    starting with your capture device {camera/scanner/service bureau's output},
    include your monitor, and your final output devices, whether you print, or
    send out for printing). What you want to achieve is a final product, i.e.
    print (photo or mechanical ink on papper) looking like it did to your eye in
    real life, including how it appears on your monitor. If you send out to many
    sources for final prints, it becomes a bit more tricky, but then system
    calibration is tricky. You might have to build profiles, or have them
    furnished, for each output house. Calibrating one's monitor is but one step in
    the process. There are several dozen books, and probably hundreds of tutorials
    on system calibration. One place to start would be a look at Ben Wilmore's
    Studio Techniques for Photoshop CS(2), if that is the processing program that
    you use - I don't recall now and don't have the OP up on my news server. He
    lists a good step-by-step proceedure. I'm sure that most of the others do, as
    well.

    It will take time, and some test prints, but if you source your printing to
    only one shop, I'll bet they will work with you to keep the expenses down,
    because they want your business, and for you to be pleased, with very few
    reprints at their expense. They may even have profiles for you add to your
    workflow to get you close to begin with.

    Good luck,
    Hunt
     
    Hunt, Aug 4, 2005
    #12
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.