Photography allowed at concerts?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ben Thomas, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. Ben Thomas

    Mark² Guest

    Ya, probably right.
    I was assuming he was near front row, which might have meant he'd be in
    near-similar light.
    Other times, if close enough, you can even zoom in on something that is
    near-grey or near white (perhaps a base drum face?) that is right on stage.

    Most folks aren't that close.
     
    Mark², Jan 17, 2005
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  2. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    So why did you say "a memory cannot be sold"?

    It seems to me you are suggesting that the reason for the no photography at the
    concert rule is they want to stop people taking photos to sell. Therefore they
    are assuming guilt before proving it, so to speak.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
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    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 17, 2005
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  3. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    I'm going to be in the second row in front of the stage actually. No mosh pit.

    I'll set the white balance to sunny. Seems to result in the best pics from my
    camera.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 17, 2005
  4. Ben Thomas

    Larry Guest

    They dont need to PROVE anything, since they made it a contractual agreement
    on the ticket "No Photography Allowed"... That is reason enough to not take
    pictures.
     
    Larry, Jan 17, 2005
  5. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    It's sad that they would make such a rule to stop a few professionals that
    actually stops the majority of concert goers from being able to take a personal
    snapshot as a memento for the future.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 17, 2005

  6. I think that's one of the points of this discussion. Does a few words
    on a ticket constitute a legal contract?

    As a camera store manager, I was once involved in the legal wranglings
    about the compensation from someone's lost pictures. This
    photographer, a local semipro, had sent some wedding negatives to
    Kodak. Kodak either lost or damaged them (don't remember which) and
    refused to pay out more than the cost of the replacement film. They
    claimed that the "contract" on the stub specifically stated that was
    thier limit of liability. The court did not agree because that
    disclaimer did not constitute a contract.

    Philip
     
    Philip Procter, Jan 18, 2005
  7. Ben Thomas

    Colin D Guest

    <snip>

    In an allied field to notices on tickets is the legal wording on
    invoices to the
    effect that ownership of the goods remains with the supplier until the
    goods have been paid for in full - the so-called 'Romalpa Clause'

    During the setting up of a company here in NZ for the wholesale supply
    of tyre retreading and repairing equipment in which I was involved, it
    was pointed out by the legal eagles that the very common practice of
    putting the Romalpa clause on every invoice as part of the purchase
    requirements was in fact invalid. It was said that any notification of
    this clause after the fact of the purchase - which is when the customer
    got his copy of the invoice - could not be enforced because the customer
    was not informed of its existence until after the purchase had been
    made.

    I should think a similar line could be taken with the concert ticket.
    If the condition of no cameras, recorders, etc. was to be enforceable,
    the purchaser must be informed before he buys the ticket. If the
    wording is on the ticket and he doesn't see it till after he has bought
    it, he can claim that the condition is unenforceable.

    If a heavy muscles him out of the venue none too gently, and it goes to
    court, taking the above line might work.

    Colin
     
    Colin D, Jan 18, 2005
  8. Ben Thomas

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Yes, generally speaking.
    That's an exception to the rule, then, since disclaimers are usually
    held to be valid, within broad limits.

    The most egregious misuse of disclaimers (apart from the one you cite)
    is probably in the world of software, where software publishers try to
    disclaim responsibility for absolutely everything except the replacement
    cost of the media. This type of disclaimer is so all-encompassing that
    it essentially means that customers are paying for nothing, and so it
    may not constitute a valid contract. But for some reason software
    companies seem to be considered "special."
     
    Mxsmanic, Jan 18, 2005
  9. One possibility is that the promoter has sold the exclusive photoshoot
    rights to an individual/agency therefor the provisions of entry are as
    such. Though your intentions are clear to yourself and you are (nearly
    :) ) totally trustworthy that cannot vouchsafe those other mongrel
    bastards.
    eric phillips
     
    eric phillips, Jan 18, 2005
  10. Ben Thomas

    kashe Guest

    Read up on "in terrorem" clauses.
     
    kashe, Jan 18, 2005
  11. Ben Thomas

    wayne Guest

    that "CASE" sounds like BS to me if the Ticket language was not valid then
    how could the guy win as he would have to PROVE the film he dropped off
    contained the wedding pictures since the film was lost he could not prove
    his case at all, unless he wrote Jones wedding pictures 10 rolls or some
    such. Kodak could just say that the film was just pictures of rock?

    Wayne
     
    wayne, Jan 18, 2005
  12. I'd be thinking along the lines of using a tungsten WB setting, seeing
    as the stage lights are incandescent (though probably a lot 'whiter'
    than the living room lamp) with colored gels in front... Perhaps
    zooming in on a stage light with no colored filters and setting a manual
    white balance off of that?

    Bob ^,,^
     
    Bob Harrington, Jan 19, 2005
  13. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    A tungsten setting, I can choose, but there's no manual WB in my Kodak DX6490.

    Thank you for the tip.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 19, 2005
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