Photography allowed at concerts?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Ben Thomas, Jan 12, 2005.

  1. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Hi all,

    I'm going to see Mark Knofler (lead guitarist of Dire Straits, now solo artist)
    in a couple of months and I've got a seat in the second row in front of the
    stage. I'd like to take my camera and get a few pictures, but it says on my
    ticket "no cameras or audio recording equipment". I've only got a Kodak DX6490,
    so it's nothing too obvious/professional looking like a DSLR. This concert is
    unlikely to have security guards lined up along the front of the stage as the
    average age of the audience will probably be 40+. I won't be using the flash and
    it probably wouldn't be worth it anyway as it's low powered and wouldn't reach
    anyone but the nearest musician on stage.

    Has anyone tried taking a small camera to events like this and been able to take
    photos without getting their camera confiscated, even though it says somewhere
    you are not supposed to?

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 12, 2005
    #1
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  2. If you are in the 2nd row, and security sees you.....well, you'll probably
    have the crap beat out of you. Carefully read your ticket again, and tell
    us what it says.
     
    Toomanyputters, Jan 12, 2005
    #2
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  3. Ben Thomas

    PeterL Guest

    Your question is not whether cameras are allowed. It's pretty clear from
    your own reading that they are not. You want to know if you'd get caught
    and be embarassed in front of thousands of people. Well who knows. You are
    sitting so close maybe the performers will see your camera and throw a
    guitar at you.
     
    PeterL, Jan 12, 2005
    #3
  4. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    I already told you what it says.

    Do you actually have any experience trying to photograph at a concert with the
    ticket conditions I mentioned? That is specifically what I asked, and if you
    don't, why bother answering? It's not the least bit helpful.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 12, 2005
    #4
  5. Ben Thomas

    Graham Guest

    Your ticket says "No cameras" It means "No cameras" You could take a
    camera, you could take some pictures and get away with it. You might
    not get away with it, the ticket does say "No cameras"

    The choice is yours.
     
    Graham, Jan 12, 2005
    #5
  6. Ben Thomas

    Darrell Guest

    Ticket says no cameras, so security will remove your camera and remove you
    from the venue. They can also ban you from future events at that venue.

    What part of NO isn't clear?
     
    Darrell, Jan 12, 2005
    #6
  7. Oh well. Go ahead and give it a try and report back.
     
    Toomanyputters, Jan 12, 2005
    #7
  8. Ben Thomas

    Jim Townsend Guest

    It doesn't say professional cameras.. It just says no cameras :)

    If they see you, you could lose it, or you could be escorted out of
    the concert.

    I've have been involved in security at rock concerts including large ones
    with The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, U2, AC/DC, etc..

    It depends on the venue, but it's not uncommon for security to randomly pat
    down patrons as they enter, looking for contraband. If your camera turns up,
    you'll have to surrender it or turn around and leave.

    I've been out of it for a quite a while now, but I'd expect security will
    be fairly tight because of 9/11 concerns and the fact that the founder
    of the group Pantera was recently shot and killed by a deranged fan last
    month during a performance at a nightclub in Ohio.
     
    Jim Townsend, Jan 12, 2005
    #8
  9. Ben Thomas

    Chuck Guest

    what they do if they catch you ? erase the pictures or keep the camera ?
     
    Chuck, Jan 12, 2005
    #9
  10. Ben Thomas

    ZONED! Guest


    LOL! Nobody will lay a hand on a ticket holder for trying to take
    pictures in a concert. Too much to lose in a lawsuit. My guess is that
    you will not make it past the door where your camera will be either
    confiscated (usually it can be recovered after the show, but no
    guarantees) or you will be allowed to return it to your car. If you
    make it past the door into the show and are caught (distinct
    possibility depending on the performer, security, venue etc.), you may
    loose the camera. they are covered by the printed ticket. Outdoor
    events are usually much more lax.
     
    ZONED!, Jan 12, 2005
    #10
  11. Ben Thomas

    ZONED! Guest

    LOL! and you would sue the performer, the management and the
    auditorium. I have seen people lose cameras and get kicked out of the
    event on a few different occasions but never saw anything leading to
    bodily injury.
     
    ZONED!, Jan 12, 2005
    #11
  12. Ben Thomas

    Eric Miller Guest

    Legally, they can neither seize your camera nor erase your images. They can
    just kick you out. The last concert I attended, B.B. King, there were so
    many flashes going off in the audience they would have had to kick out
    everyone. The tickets said, "No cameras or recording equipment."

    Eric Miller
     
    Eric Miller, Jan 12, 2005
    #12
  13. Ben Thomas

    Eric Miller Guest

    "they" are not covered for seizing a camera by a ticket that says no
    cameras. Seizing another person's camera would be simple theft. However,
    they don't have to let you in with it. So, it would probably be your choice.
    Give up the camera or don't come in.

    Eric Miller
     
    Eric Miller, Jan 12, 2005
    #13
  14. Ben Thomas

    Darrell Guest

    Confiscate the camera and charge you with trespassing, as the concert hall
    is private property. They can also bar you from attending anything in that
    hall again.
     
    Darrell, Jan 12, 2005
    #14
  15. Ben Thomas

    Darrell Guest

    Are you sure, it's private property. If you violate the ticket conditions
    you can be charged with trespass, and banned from that venue. The performers
    can also sue you for trademark infringement, as they own all rights to their
    images.
     
    Darrell, Jan 12, 2005
    #15
  16. Ben Thomas

    PeterL Guest

    Who would know if someone is bringing a camera in? Esp. with all the camera
    phones.
     
    PeterL, Jan 13, 2005
    #16
  17. Ben Thomas

    Crownfield Guest

    talk about a slow learner.
    read the ticket.
    thats your answer.

     
    Crownfield, Jan 13, 2005
    #17
  18. Ben Thomas

    Frank Vuotto Guest

    There's NO LAW against taking a camera into a concert no matter what
    the ticket says. There are a lot of 'NO THIS, NO THAT, DO NOT.., NOT
    RESPONSIBLE FOR ....'(etc) signs around that just have no law behind
    them.

    They're just there to intimidate the sheep.

    Frank /~ http://newmex.com/f10
    @/
     
    Frank Vuotto, Jan 13, 2005
    #18
  19. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest


    Thanks Eric. An actual answer to my question. I thought I remembered people
    taking photos when I went to Roger Waters, but I thought I'd see what other
    people's experience was.

    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 13, 2005
    #19
  20. Ben Thomas

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Your comprehension skills are woeful. I was clearly asking if anyone had tried
    it and if the rules had actually been enforced.
    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - Melbourne, Australia

    My Digital World:
    Kodak DX6490, Canon i9950, Pioneer A05;
    Hitachi 37" HD plasma display, DGTEC 2000A,
    Denon 2800, H/K AVR4500, Whatmough Encore;
    Sony Ericsson K700i, Palm Tungsten T.

    Disclaimer:
    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer shall be understood as neither
    given nor endorsed by it.
     
    Ben Thomas, Jan 13, 2005
    #20
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