People who don't return and pay for thier computer repair

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Jeff Stelson, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. Jeff Stelson

    Jeff Stelson Guest

    Hi,
    I have been repairing computers for quite some time. Have never had a
    problem with people paying and picking up thier computer till now. I
    have a customer who dropped off her computer for repair about three
    months ago. Everytime I see her (we live in a small town) she tells me
    how she will be over to pick it up "When I get my check next week".

    This has been going on too long, and I want my money. She is supposed to
    come by today or tomorrow SHE SAID and pick it up, but, somehow, I know
    it's not going to happen. I would like to find out how other techs have
    handled this situation. What are my options?? Any suggestions are
    really appreciated!!
    Thanks
     
    Jeff Stelson, Nov 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Jeff Stelson

    AG Guest

    In both of the repair business that I've worked at we had some people that
    wouldn't come get repaired machines. We gave them 90 days and then sold
    them. We had a sign to that effect on the wall.
    Since you're in a small town I'd call her and tell her you need your money
    or at least a down payment or you're going to have to put it up for sale.

    AG
     
    AG, Nov 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Have it clearly posted that you will charge for storage after thirty
    days. Make sure, though, that you are able to legally do this in your
    community.

    Tom
     
    Tom MacIntyre, Nov 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Jeff Stelson

    ghz1862 Guest

    When in business this will happen, so try not to get too upset about it.
    Since you live in a small town it might be better to have patience with her
    because it could help your reputation, and if you go and sell her computer
    as others have suggested it may kill a lot of future business in your town,
    even if your right in doing so.

    Maybe the person is going through a very difficult time financially right
    now, and be ever so grateful for your understanding and patience, and in
    turn tell all their friends what a wonderful person you are and that they
    should take their business to you.

    IMHO....
     
    ghz1862, Nov 5, 2004
    #4
  5. Jeff Stelson

    poorspeller Guest

    AGREED!!! I think it it better to accomidate her and possably **gain** a lot
    more future business, and repeat business. All the other suggestions telling
    to to sell or charge a fee for storage work for the larger repair places.
    Although I don't understand why... as a little understanding towards a
    person who might be going through money problems would go a long way even
    for the "big guys" Good business relations should always outweigh the
    dollar. In the long run, that will always pay off!!

    My (humble as it is) oppinion.

    davemeek
     
    poorspeller, Nov 5, 2004
    #5
  6. Jeff Stelson

    el Diablo Guest

    My two bits:

    My parents used to own a Typewriter/Adding Machine Repair and Office
    Supply Business back in the late 70's and early 80's. (I know type-what??)

    They had both the after-thirty-day-storage charge and the
    sold-if-left-longer-than-90-day thing because they got burned by a lot
    people. Unfortunately, IMHO, must people are out there trying to trying
    screw who they can in search of saving some almighty dollars.

    But, ranting aside, I think that those rules should be posted clearly at
    your business and that you should be willing to be flexible with people.
    I like the suggestion that you work with her on a payment method, but
    remember: write it down and get it signed by both parties. If you want
    to put something in there about being able to amend the terms in order
    to give her more time, that is fine. Have something to fall back on. If
    you rollover, people steamroll over you.

    BTW, I'd be careful about the small town thing, because it can work both
    ways. If you rollover, she could tell all her friends that you are a
    pushover and, well, you know...
     
    el Diablo, Nov 5, 2004
    #6
  7. Jeff Stelson

    el Diablo Guest

    My two bits:

    My parents used to own a Typewriter/Adding Machine Repair and Office
    Supply Business back in the late 70's and early 80's. (I know type-what??)

    They had both the after-thirty-day-storage charge and the
    sold-if-left-longer-than-90-day thing because they got burned by a lot
    people. Unfortunately, IMHO, must people are out there trying to trying
    screw who they can in search of saving some almighty dollars.

    But, ranting aside, I think that those rules should be posted clearly at
    your business and that you should be willing to be flexible with people.
    I like the suggestion that you work with her on a payment method, but
    remember: write it down and get it signed by both parties. If you want
    to put something in there about being able to amend the terms in order
    to give her more time, that is fine. Have something to fall back on. If
    you rollover, people steamroll over you.

    BTW, I'd be careful about the small town thing, because it can work both
    ways. If you rollover, she could tell all her friends that you are a
    pushover and, well, you know...
     
    el Diablo, Nov 5, 2004
    #7
  8. Jeff Stelson

    el Diablo Guest

    My two bits:

    My parents used to own a Typewriter/Adding Machine Repair and Office
    Supply Business back in the late 70's and early 80's. (I know type-what??)

    They had both the after-thirty-day-storage charge and the
    sold-if-left-longer-than-90-day thing because they got burned by a lot
    people. Unfortunately, IMHO, must people are out there trying to trying
    screw who they can in search of saving some almighty dollars.

    But, ranting aside, I think that those rules should be posted clearly at
    your business and that you should be willing to be flexible with people.
    I like the suggestion that you work with her on a payment method, but
    remember: write it down and get it signed by both parties. If you want
    to put something in there about being able to amend the terms in order
    to give her more time, that is fine. Have something to fall back on. If
    you rollover, people steamroll over you.

    BTW, I'd be careful about the small town thing, because it can work both
    ways. If you rollover, she could tell all her friends that you are a
    pushover and, well, you know...
     
    el Diablo, Nov 5, 2004
    #8
  9. Jeff Stelson

    AG Guest

    I too live in a small town and even in a small town you have to get paid or
    you go out of business. Most people understand that and the ones that don't
    probably aren't worth doing business with.
    We've all got to pay our bills and all we have to sell is our knowledge and
    abilities.

    AG
     
    AG, Nov 5, 2004
    #9
  10. That gives her the opportunity to buy it back also...
    with a fair amount of warning...
    Send a letter to her a week prior to sale date..
    (37 cents added to bill of course)....
    what can she say about your
    reputation when you have given 90 days to retrieve her machine and
    a letter stating she has one week left to get it....
     
    «bonehead;\), Nov 5, 2004
    #10
  11. Jeff Stelson

    el Diablo Guest

    My two bits:

    My parents used to own a Typewriter/Adding Machine Repair and Office
    Supply Business back in the late 70's and early 80's. (I know type-what??)

    They had both the after-thirty-day-storage charge and the
    sold-if-left-longer-than-90-day thing because they got burned by a lot
    people. Unfortunately, IMHO, must people are out there trying to trying
    screw who they can in search of saving some almighty dollars.

    But, ranting aside, I think that those rules should be posted clearly at
    your business and that you should be willing to be flexible with people.
    I like the suggestion that you work with her on a payment method, but
    remember: write it down and get it signed by both parties. If you want
    to put something in there about being able to amend the terms in order
    to give her more time, that is fine. Have something to fall back on. If
    you rollover, people steamroll over you.

    BTW, I'd be careful about the small town thing, because it can work both
    ways. If you rollover, she could tell all her friends that you are a
    pushover and, well, you know...
     
    el Diablo, Nov 5, 2004
    #11
  12. Jeff Stelson

    Jeff Stelson Guest

    A big thanks to everyone who has responded. I am sitting here waiting
    for her to call or drop by, and to be honest, I feel a little like a
    fool.

    She called earlier and said she WOULD be by at 5:00 to give me the money
    and pick it up. To be honest I'm not sure what I will do or CAN do.
    The suggestions that were given were all excellent, but I'm afraid I
    should have done them when she dropped it off :(:( darn!!
     
    Jeff Stelson, Nov 5, 2004
    #12
  13. Jeff Stelson

    Jeff Stelson Guest

    finally got my money....
    from now on it's going to be different..........
     
    Jeff Stelson, Nov 6, 2004
    #13
  14. Jeff Stelson

    Lap Guest

    If this was a business user. The previous service agreement will have where
    if the item is not picked up within a certain time frame. Storage fees will
    apply. And if the item is not picked up after 6 months. The item remains the
    property of the servicer.

    In Australia, our Fair Trading office explains the process of your right to
    charge for the storage space. It also outlines the part where the item can
    legally be your property after x amount of months. But you have to have a
    record of payment requests at least 3 or so to the client. Check with your
    local Fair Trading office.

    But as a small town for a residential user. I may be a little bit lenient.
    If the non-payment exceeds 1+ month. I would personally call the client and
    make an appointment to discuss the payment options. Confirm the agreement
    and get it signed by the client. If the client breaches the agreement then
    you keep the item. Or take it to some small claims tribunal court.

    YOU ARE THE BUSINESS. YOU OFFER THE SERVICE. YOU GET THE MONEY. YOU HAVE TO
    PAY OTHER BILLS. YOU ARE NOT A CHARITY. Do not over do with compassion.

    Be firm.
     
    Lap, Nov 7, 2004
    #14
  15. Glad to hear that.

    On a couple of occasions, when all collection attempts have failed, I've offered
    a discount if they pick the unit up within a specified time interval. For
    example, I might offer a $25 discount if the unit is picked up within the next
    seven days. Kinda goes against my better judgement, but it worked

    On the lighter side, I once read of a servicer who used a clever ploy to get a
    reluctant customer to pick up his TV set. The shop owner had his secretary call
    the customer to explain that his set was accidently thrown out. Naturally, the
    customer rushes to the shop and demands a new set. The shop owner waits on the
    customer and calmly asks for the customers receipt. "Just a moment", he says as
    he walks in the back room. A short time later he produces the customer's set.
    "I'm sorry, my secretary must have been a mistake. Here's your set right here."

    Alan Harriman
     
    Alan Harriman, Nov 7, 2004
    #15
  16. Jeff Stelson

    Jeff Stelson Guest

    Now that was good!
     
    Jeff Stelson, Nov 7, 2004
    #16
  17. Jeff Stelson

    [JK] Chewwy Guest

    My Name is Scott and I had a computer store for four years.
    Out of that four years I have gotten "stiffed" a few times ...it happens...
    I also am familiar with the "small Town" syndrome we were in a town of about
    50,000 people,but I had people come in because of word of mouth.
    The two things you want to protect is (1)Word of mouth and(2)yellow pages
    advertising.
    In the case of Slow pay people, I had to adjust my policy and ,at first, I
    felt Guilty doing it, but in the long run it help tremendously. I took a
    small "diagnostic fee" up front ($39.00) then they signed a small statement
    at the bottom of the work order. The statement said if the computer was not
    picked up within 30 days after completion of work and the customer was
    contacted,that the computer would be sold for cost of repairs. It worked
    wonderfully except in a few cases.It brought people in to see if anyone had
    defaulted on their payments,therefore getting a good bargain,and it made the
    people come in and at least pay something on the computer for me to keep it
    a little longer.
    I did have one man wanting to pick up his computer before it was completely
    paid off, and it was hard for me to say no,but in the end he never came to
    pay it off and I would have been out of the parts and labor I put into
    it(200.00).
    So ,I hope Iv'e helped you with your problem,or questions. It's better to
    learn from others experience than the school of hard Knocks :)
     
    [JK] Chewwy, Nov 30, 2004
    #17
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