Panasonic ditches plastic in its new G-body

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Jul 18, 2012
    #1
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  2. RichA

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Jul 18, 2012
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Bruce Guest



    It hardly matters what the front panel (Panasonic G5) or whole body
    shell (Olympus OM-D E-M5) is made of when in both cameras the key
    components requiring - and providing - dimensional accuracy are made
    of plastic. I refer to the chassis that carry both the sensor and the
    lens mount.

    The outer shell is purely that, a shell. If it is made of metal, all
    it does is conceal the plastic from view. It plays absolutely no part
    in the structural rigidity and dimensional stability of the only bits
    that matter.
     
    Bruce, Jul 18, 2012
    #3
  4. RichA

    Mort Guest

    Hi,

    This reminds me of when the Olympus OM-4Ti first appeared with much
    advertising about the new titanium body. It turns out that the body was
    identical to the old OM-4, and only a very thin top plate was titanium.
    Does it really matter, except for marketing? No.

    Mort Linder
     
    Mort, Jul 19, 2012
    #4
  5. RichA

    RichA Guest

    I think the bottom plate was as well, because they both show finish
    wear. I had one.
     
    RichA, Jul 19, 2012
    #5
  6. RichA

    ray Guest

    g5-dslm-claims-new-benchmark

    Wish I could understand the blanket condemnation so many folks have for
    everything 'plastic'. Modern 'plastics' come in a wide variety of
    formulations which can have quite a variety of physical properties
    depending on the intended use. And it is my understanding that at least
    some 'plastics' are more stable than many metals - which do, in fact,
    expand and contract with temperature. Carbon fibre and kevlar are good
    examples - kevlar is used extensively in 'bulletproof' vests and is much
    stronger than steel - not only pound for pound but also in lines (ropes)
    diameter for diameter.
     
    ray, Jul 20, 2012
    #6
  7. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but scrap polycarbonate is neither
    carbon fiber or kevlar.
     
    RichA, Jul 20, 2012
    #7
  8. RichA

    RichA Guest

    It's not as good as metal. It's not as strong, it expands and
    contracts more with temperature change (which makes any weather-
    sealing questionable) and it cannot be made as accurately when it
    comes to machining. Also, it requires strengthening with metal at key
    points or premature wear will occur. In addition, it requires thicker
    walls when making products because of flexture. One good thing about
    it, for cheap cameras, a finish can be pre-molded or "built-in" to the
    plastic, unlike metal.
     
    RichA, Jul 20, 2012
    #8
  9. RichA

    ray Guest

    It would seem that if polycarbonate is good enough for the cockpit canopy
    of the F-22 fighter and used for motorcycle, small plane and helicopter
    windscreens, and bulletproof windows, it might be good enough for the
    case of a camera.
     
    ray, Jul 21, 2012
    #9
  10. RichA

    Joe Kotroczo Guest

    On 20/07/2012 13:22, RichA wrote:

    (...)
    That has changed recently, company called Liquidmetal has patented a
    process that allows pre-molding metal.

    Apple have bagged an exclusive licence to use the stuff in consumer
    electronics.
     
    Joe Kotroczo, Jul 22, 2012
    #10
  11. It's just RichA, and he's got the idea that plastic lives and
    tries to strangle him at night or something.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jul 23, 2012
    #11
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