Overcoming insufficient permissions for PDF image extraction to JPEG

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by bentknuckle, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. To attempt to further the knowledge level here, I would guess the advantage
    of the APDFPR password removal tool is that there would be no potential
    damage to the document which might occur with the conversion process of
    protected PDF to unprotected PostScript back to unprotected PDF.

    I would also guess the main advantage of the Ghostscript/GSview/ps2edit
    method is it's freely available and it works even for those who don't have
    the Adobe Acrobat Standard or Adobe Acrobat Professional programs (is there
    anyone out there who actually uses the brain-dead Adobe Acrobat Reader?).

    Given that, this is my recommendation for modifying personal PDF files:
    - Install Ghostscript & GSview & Pstoedit (as explained previously)
    - Open your protected Portable Document Format (PDF) file in GSview
    - Save (as pswrite) that protected PDF to a (an unprotected) PS file
    - Convert that PS file back to PDF using the Adobe Acrobat Distiller
    - Voila!

    ME
     
    Hans Barnhofter, Jul 29, 2005
    #21
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  2. This is very interesting so it would be nice to get a real legal opinion as
    I am NOT a lawyer and I do NOT know or understand copyright law as it
    pertains to individual use and I am not a moral person by any means (I live
    in a glass house and so do you and BMW).

    Does the BMW copyright really say what you imply?

    a) For example, does the BMW copyright really prevent you from PRINTING
    (for your own personal use) the beemer manual you purchased for $100 or the
    bimmer owners manual you downloaded for free from them? (Note the password
    protection can disable printing unless you manually remove that printing
    restriction as described in this thread.)

    b) Does the BMW copyright say you can't convert the manual to Microsoft
    Word, Microsoft RTF, Adobe FrameMaker, JPEG, GIF, AutoDesk DXF, Adobe
    PostScript, etc.? (Note the methods described allow you to do all of these
    conversions, and more.)

    c) Does the BMW copyright say you can't add or delete pages from the
    documents you bought or downloaded from them? (The methods described allow
    you to add and delete pages as desired.)

    d) Does the BMW copyright say you can't cut and paste text from and to
    those documents you bought or downloaded from them for use in an email or
    other personal use? (The methods described enable copy and paste of lines
    of text as needed.)

    e) And, lastly, (and perhaps most important for this thread), does the BMW
    copyright say you can not take a JPEG of a page of the beemer or bimmer
    shop manual and then annotate that page with your problem for the purpose
    of posting that newly annotated PDF to a bimmer or beemer forum for the
    purpose of obtaining help in repairing your motorcycle or automobile?

    In summary, my question to the legal folks is, if all these five desires
    (printing pages, converting pages, adding or deleting pages, cutting and
    pasting text from pages, and annotating pages with photos for repair
    purposes) are actually expressly forbidden in the BMW copyright, then we
    should not be running or suggesting this conversion of password-protected
    PDF to password-free PDF files!

    ME
     
    Hans Barnhofter, Jul 29, 2005
    #22
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  3. bentknuckle

    John Weiss Guest

    Print and scan it, save as JPEG.

    If you have the full Acrobat app or another PDF creator, "print" it to
    another PDF file, then extract it.
     
    John Weiss, Jul 29, 2005
    #23
  4. Yup, you're true Outlaw Bikers now.

    Where's rec.motorcycles.warez?



    Yarrr,

    -Chris
     
    C. Deforrest Smith, Jul 29, 2005
    #24
  5. bentknuckle

    Dirty Harry Guest

    Take a screenshot.
     
    Dirty Harry, Jul 29, 2005
    #25
  6. bentknuckle

    kashe Guest

    Let me save your and everyone else's time by summarizing the
    upcoming 4,000 postings:

    50% will say you rightfully own two things -- a physical CD and a
    license to do exactly what, and not a whit more than, what is allowed
    in the EULA which you most likely were not allowed to read before
    opening the CD, which action made it non-returnable.

    The remaining 50% will assert that they agree with your position and
    (morally, at least) you should have the right to do anything you wish
    with it.

    At the end of the 4,000 posts, the argument will have advanced
    no further than it has for the duration of the past 300 iterations of
    the topic.
     
    kashe, Jul 30, 2005
    #26
  7. bentknuckle

    kashe Guest

    It took you this long (conveniently after you'd done the deed)
    to get to this conclusion?
    Are you realy that much of a single-digit IQ that you think
    these questions mean squat? BMW's copyright doesn't have to answer
    your picky little "desires" individually. The woefully short answer is
    that copyright does exactly what the name says -- it reserves the
    RIGHT of COPYing to the copyright holder. The law specifies what that
    means, so get off your lazy ass and do some legal research.

    If you want a real guffaw, sunmit your inane questions to
    BMW's legal department, complete with your copies from their manual,
    and ask how far you can legally go with this. I'm sure they'll be
    happy to send you a copy of their standard C&D letter.
     
    kashe, Jul 30, 2005
    #27
  8. bentknuckle

    Steve W. Guest

    copyright: an overview

    The U.S. Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §§ 101 - 810, is Federal legislation
    enacted by Congress under its Constitutional grant of authority to
    protect the writings of authors. See U.S. Constitution, Article I,
    Section 8. Changing technology has led to an ever expanding
    understanding of the word "writings". The Copyright Act now reaches
    architectural design, software, the graphic arts, motion pictures, and
    sound recordings. See § 106 of the act. Given the scope of the Federal
    legislation and its provision precluding inconsistent state law, the
    field is almost exclusively a Federal one. See § 301 of the act.

    A copyright gives the owner the exclusive right to reproduce,
    distribute, perform, display, or license his work. See § 106 of the act.
    The owner also receives the exclusive right to produce or license
    derivatives of his or her work. See § 201(d) of the act. Limited
    exceptions to this exclusivity exist for types of "fair use", such as
    book reviews. See § 107 of the act. To be covered by copyright a work
    must be original and in a concrete "medium of expression." See § 102 of
    the act. Under current law, works are covered whether or not a copyright
    notice is attached and whether or not the work is registered.

    The federal agency charged with administering the act is the Copyright
    Office of the Library of Congress. See § 701 of the act. Its regulations
    are found in Parts 201 - 204 of title 37 of the Code of Federal
    Regulations.

    http://www.copyright.gov/

    http://www.whatiscopyright.org/


    Copyright is a protection that covers published and unpublished
    literary, scientific and artistic works, whatever the form of
    expression, provided such works are fixed in a tangible or material
    form. This means that if you can see it, hear it and/or touch it - it
    may be protected. If it is an essay, if it is a play, if it is a song,
    if it is a funky original dance move, if it is a photograph, HTML coding
    or a computer graphic that can be set on paper, recorded on tape or
    saved to a hard drive, it may be protected. Copyright laws grant the
    creator the exclusive right to reproduce, prepare derivative works,
    distribute, perform and display the work publicly. Exclusive means only
    the creator of such work, not anybody who has access to it and decides
    to grab it.


    http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html
     
    Steve W., Jul 30, 2005
    #28
  9. bentknuckle

    Mike Ross Guest

    On Sat, 30 Jul 2005 03:41:33 GMT, wrote:

    Starting with the concept of 'fair use'. Broadly, if you only quote
    small parts of the manual, and/or don't make money from it, and/or
    don't do something that is likely to cost BMW sales of manuals, you're
    OK.

    Mike
     
    Mike Ross, Jul 30, 2005
    #29
  10. bentknuckle

    NotMe Guest

    "Steve W."
    |
    | copyright: an overview
    |
    | The U.S. Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §§ 101 - 810, is Federal legislation
    | enacted by Congress under its Constitutional grant of authority to
    | protect the writings of authors. See U.S. Constitution, Article I,
    | Section 8. Changing technology has led to an ever expanding
    | understanding of the word "writings". The Copyright Act now reaches
    | architectural design, software, the graphic arts, motion pictures, and
    | sound recordings. See § 106 of the act. Given the scope of the Federal
    | legislation and its provision precluding inconsistent state law, the
    | field is almost exclusively a Federal one. See § 301 of the act.
    |
    | A copyright gives the owner the exclusive right to reproduce,
    | distribute, perform, display, or license his work. See § 106 of the act.
    | The owner also receives the exclusive right to produce or license
    | derivatives of his or her work. See § 201(d) of the act. Limited
    | exceptions to this exclusivity exist for types of "fair use", such as
    | book reviews. See § 107 of the act. To be covered by copyright a work
    | must be original and in a concrete "medium of expression." See § 102 of
    | the act. Under current law, works are covered whether or not a copyright
    | notice is attached and whether or not the work is registered.
    |
    | The federal agency charged with administering the act is the Copyright
    | Office of the Library of Congress. See § 701 of the act. Its regulations
    | are found in Parts 201 - 204 of title 37 of the Code of Federal
    | Regulations.
    |
    | http://www.copyright.gov/
    |
    | http://www.whatiscopyright.org/
    |
    |
    | Copyright is a protection that covers published and unpublished
    | literary, scientific and artistic works, whatever the form of
    | expression, provided such works are fixed in a tangible or material
    | form. This means that if you can see it, hear it and/or touch it - it
    | may be protected. If it is an essay, if it is a play, if it is a song,
    | if it is a funky original dance move, if it is a photograph, HTML coding
    | or a computer graphic that can be set on paper, recorded on tape or
    | saved to a hard drive, it may be protected. Copyright laws grant the
    | creator the exclusive right to reproduce, prepare derivative works,
    | distribute, perform and display the work publicly. Exclusive means only
    | the creator of such work, not anybody who has access to it and decides
    | to grab it.
    |
    |
    | http://www.templetons.com/brad/copymyths.html


    Don't confuse physical possession of a copy of the work in any media with
    ownership of the copy right. the two are vastly different. (do a goodle on
    first purchase). the owner of the copy right can be very specific in what
    can or cannot be done with the subject material which can include
    precipitations against any copying, transfer or transformation.
     
    NotMe, Jul 30, 2005
    #30
  11. bentknuckle

    J. Clarke Guest

    The copyright says that BMW can do as they please with their own data,
    subject to a few limitations that come under the general heading of
    "fair use". Printing out the entire manual does not in general
    constitute "fair use" although since "fair use" is substantially
    established by legal precedent rather than by statute there may be
    specific exceptions to that general rule.

    Your hundred dollars does not buy anything but what BMW provided. If
    they chose to disable printing in the PDF they have every right to do
    so, and under the DMCA the mere possession of software that
    circumvents that restriction can in itself be a criminal offense.

    What specifically you can do with what you bought should be covered by
    the contract under which you purchased it--there should have been some
    page of legalese that you had to agree to before the download would
    start. To find out what you are and are not allowed to do under that
    contract, you really need to read it.
    Again, you need to read the contract.
    Once again, you need to read the contract.
    Once again you need to read the contract.
    If you are not specifically constrained from doing so by the terms of
    the contract, that last would very likely come under the heading of
    "fair use", however if there has been no court ruling on the specific
    circumstances you might still have to defend it.
    Removing a password without the permission of the copyright owner
    would very likely be a violation of the DMCA, as would the possession
    of the means to do so, so it's not terribly wise to be discussing it
    in an open forum.

    While the motorcycle industry does not have a watchdog agency with the
    ferocity of RIAA or MPAA, there's still a remote chance that someone
    at BMW might take exception to your activities and make a project of
    ruining your life, which unless you are very well off is likely to be
    the case if litigation commences even if you win.
     
    J. Clarke, Jan 21, 2009
    #31
  12. Did you notice the date of 29 Jul 2005 ?
     
    Rob Kleinschmidt, Jan 21, 2009
    #32
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