OT : Cat5e Wall Sockets

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by Steve Ray, Feb 1, 2006.

  1. Steve Ray

    Steve Ray Guest

    Guys

    One of my junior net techies assures me that he has seen Cat5e wall sockets
    with LED's on the front panels indicating if there is a carrier on the line.

    I've googled and googled this afternoon in attempt to find these as I think
    they would be invaluable in our environment

    Have any of you ever seen such things and if so where. I could ideally do
    with a UK reseller or manufacturer of these

    In anticipation.............

    Steve
     
    Steve Ray, Feb 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. 3Com did a line of line powered micro switches which looked like 4 port wall
    sockets which had the green lights - IIRC they were around £150 each for a
    4 port one plus you need either a POE capable switch or a wallwart
    transformer for each box.

    If you've got the money to burn...

    P.
     
    Paul S. Brown, Feb 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. Steve Ray

    Steve Ray Guest

    3Com did a line of line powered micro switches which looked like 4 port
    Hmmm

    I had an idea they would be POE but £150.00, chuff me. We only pay about
    £7.50 per double point.

    Thanks

    Steve
     
    Steve Ray, Feb 1, 2006
    #3
  4. Steve Ray

    Wil Guest

    Cat5e + POE = useless

    If you're using Cat5e you are probably hoping for a GigE conection, yes?
    POE cannot work with GigE, so what would be the point?

    -Wil
     
    Wil, Feb 1, 2006
    #4
  5. Steve Ray

    Dmitri Guest

    Wil wrote:

    IEEE 802.3af (a.k.a PoE) supports 4-pair power over signal transmission
    and hence is compatible with 1000BASE-T (GigE). In fact there are Catalyst
    switches with 10/100/1000 ports and IEEE 802.3af power.
    Anyways, the main point would be that CAT5E is the cheapest data-grade
    cabling you can buy and PoE is a great alternative to hiring an
    electrician to provide local power, so these two together can make a
    strong case for this solution even if Gigabit over PoE were not available.


    -------------------------------------
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    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
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    Dmitri, Feb 1, 2006
    #5
  6. Steve Ray

    Dmitri Guest

    I have never heard of such (passive) device and I don't think they exist.
    Let me explain why. Yes, you can measure voltage across the receiving pair
    and therefore recognize that there is a transmitter on the other end. Much
    the same way the "Link" light on most NICs operate. However, cabling
    manufacturers usually struggle to get as much performance from their
    components as possible, and the additional circuitry needed for the
    voltage sensor is not going to help. On top of that, you actually need to
    power the LED, and the Ethernet port on the switch was not designed to
    supply any power except if it's a PoE switch, of course. In the latter
    case a whole lot more circuitry is going to be required because PoE is a
    protocol, not a simple connection of 48V source to a pair of conductors.
    Thus no jack manufacturer is going to want this circuitry INSIDE the jack.
    It is best to move it into the end device - NIC and such.

    I think your junior tech was thinking of 3Com's NJ100 (200) network jack
    as was pointed out by other poster here. This device is essentially an
    Ethernet switch in shape and size that fits a US-standard size outlet back
    box. Of course, you will pay for this device as for a switch (and then
    some for unusual form-factor), not as for a CAT5E jack as you used to.
    The tech did not recognize an Ethernet switch in a shape of an outlet,
    which probably explains why he is still a junior ;-)

    So, if you want to do it cheap, nothing beats looking at the back of the
    PC to see if the "Link" light is green ;-)


    -------------------------------------
    --
    Dmitri Abaimov, RCDD
    http://www.cabling-design.com
    Cabling Forum, color codes, pinouts and other useful resources for
    premises cabling users and pros
    http://www.cabling-design.com/homecabling
    Residential Cabling Guide



    --
    ##-----------------------------------------------##
    Article posted with Cabling-Design.com Newsgroup Archive
    http://www.cabling-design.com/forums
    no-spam Web and RSS interface to your favorite newsgroup -
    comp.dcom.sys.cisco - 8813 messages and counting!
    ##-----------------------------------------------##
     
    Dmitri, Feb 1, 2006
    #6
  7. Steve Ray

    Wil Guest

    Ah, when the heck did that happen? *grin*

    I hadn't heard of this before, I'll have to look up some specs to see
    how widespread support is...

    -Wil
     
    Wil, Feb 2, 2006
    #7
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