Orifice Genuine Disadvantage

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 9, 2008.

  1. Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 9, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Even ones who _did_ pay for it--if past experience is anything to go by.
    Read the article.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Still, it's better than hazard-fraught Dimdows Registry edits, isn't it.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #3
  4. All of which involves reading text on the screen, looking for the relevant
    item each time, and clicking on it. Total time taken: 2 seconds if you're
    really fast.
    Whassa matter, you can't type without looking at the keyboard? Total time
    taken: less than 1 second..
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #4
  5. Sounds vaguely Japanese, but I think it just means "yet another Quake". :)
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #5
  6. If it's so easy, why are there so many cautions about being careful about
    your backups and what you're doing
    <http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=edit+windows+registry>?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #6
  7. Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #7
  8. There's also another issue--if you're going to make things case-insensitive,
    which language rules do you use? Different languages, even using the same
    alphabet, tend to have subtly different rules about these things.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #8
  9. There would be ways to reduce/avoid this if you want. For instance, on the
    Eee, sudo by default lets you access root privileges without a password.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #9
  10. To me, it's not so much about speed, it's about flexibility. A GUI can only
    perform functions that the designer envisaged, while a good command line
    can let you combine the basic command-line tools in ways their designers
    never thought of.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 10, 2008
    #10
  11. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Mutlley Guest

    Mutlley, Apr 10, 2008
    #11
  12. Not quite that bad. Apps still have to explicitly invoke sudo. Remember, by
    default, everything runs as the non-privileged user called "user".

    I can see why they did it, from the ease-of-use viewpoint: for instance, I
    can bring up the Network Connections utility, and set up my wireless etc,
    without having to be aware that such operations require root privilege--to
    the user, it seems no different from launching Firefox or OpenOffice.
    Whereas under the surface, FIrefox and OpenOffice run non-privileged.

    So you see, there is still security, but it's seamless--doesn't get in the
    user's way, no intrusive UAC popups or anything like that. It just works.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 11, 2008
    #12
  13. If the computer is hacked, that means they already have all the access they
    need.

    Or did you mean something other than "computer"?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 11, 2008
    #13
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.