Opportunities

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by joseph_tom, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. joseph_tom

    joseph_tom Guest

    Hi all...
    What is the scope of this .net trend? Could anybody please
    let me know? How long is it going to sustain? To what
    extent MCSD can help to build a career in this .net field?

    Bye
     
    joseph_tom, Mar 4, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. What is the scope of this .net trend?

    The whole of the microsoft world (and maybe beyond).
    Until microsoft say otherwise.
    The least extent.

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
     
    The Poster Formerly Known as Kline Sphere, Mar 4, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. joseph_tom

    Eric Guest

    In all honesty this thing is huge! I've been going to lots of Microsoft
    events and it constantly amazes me how many resources Microsoft is
    putting into .NET. It's an understatement to say "Microsoft is betting
    the farm on this".

    The next version of Windows (Longhorn) will be built around .NET. If
    you don't get on the train, it's going to run you over.

    I don't want ot say too much about my history here, but it's fair to
    say that I have NOT been a devoted fan of Microsoft over the past 10+
    years. In fact, I was very reluctant to get on board with .NET because
    I thought the whole thing was some kind of marketing ploy - remember
    those stupid .NET commercials on TV? The guy said he turned the whole
    company around using .NET technology, but the official 1.0 release of
    the framework hadn't even come yet! My company would fire me for using
    a beta product in production!

    A friend of mine spent months trying to convince me that .NET was REAL,
    substantial, and un-avoidable for Windows programmers. Once I agreed to
    look into more, it became quite obvious to me. This is not "smoke and
    mirrors"!

    Regarding the value of certification - I think it's very important now.
    Companies know this is a new technology and they want to see some proof
    that you know your stuff. A college degree, or previous Windows
    programming experience doesn't convince them that you are able to
    perform in a .NET world.

    Maybe 5 years from now it won't be quite as important. But in today's
    tough economy for programmer's it's a wise choice to show something on
    your resume that sets you apart. And if you don't have it and other
    applicants do have it, you might find yourself out of the running for
    that job.

    Eric
     
    Eric, Mar 5, 2004
    #3
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.