Online price vs retail store price?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Squiggle, Dec 1, 2007.

  1. Squiggle

    Squiggle Guest

    If a retail store has an online presence, and the website does not
    indicate that pricing is onine only pricing, is it reasonable to expect
    the the retail price in the store is the price advertised online?

    Is it legal do advertise one price on the website and then charge
    another price in the store if it is not marked as online only pricing?
     
    Squiggle, Dec 1, 2007
    #1
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  2. Squiggle

    Richard Guest

    Yes
     
    Richard, Dec 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. Squiggle

    no one Guest



    Yes the Radius chemist does.
     
    no one, Dec 1, 2007
    #3
  4. Q: Is it unreasonable to expect people to be reasonable?

    A: Yes.

    Q: So what?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Dec 1, 2007
    #4
  5. Squiggle

    Gordon Guest

    When one goes to buy something one makes an offer to the seller to buy
    the goods. The price tag which the seller puts on the goods is nothing more
    than an idea of what she would like them to be sold for. If the buyers offer
    is too low, the seller will counter offer.

    The point is that one makes a contract to buy the goods, if both sides agree
    on the price, either at the bricks and mortar place or on line. What the
    price is being asked elsewhere and by whom is not relevant.

    In this country there is freedom of speech, so sellers can ask what price
    they want, and it can change with the weather, and anything else. Hint how
    many travel tickets are one price via the Internet and another via the
    Travel agent?

    Know of a lower price, then go there and buy the goods. Market forces
    governs in this case not the legal aspect
     
    Gordon, Dec 2, 2007
    #5
  6. Squiggle

    Squiggle Guest


    How many travel agents charge over 100% more if you visit the bricks and
    mortar shop?
    How many of them also make it clear the online price is an online only
    price if they do this?
    I would have taken my business elsewhere if it hadn't been almost
    lunchtime on a saturday and something i wanted for the weekend or if the
    item had of been worth more than a few dollars. As it was they lost the
    sale of a NIC or two on that day and any future business they might have
    got from me.
     
    Squiggle, Dec 2, 2007
    #6
  7. Squiggle

    impossible Guest

    What stores do you shop in? Outside of flea markets and such, a price is
    posted and that's it -- take it or leave.
    Nonsense. If the seller has advertised one price in newspaper ads and
    circulars but then charges another at point of sale, that's fraud. And that
    seems to be the issue that the OP is raising with respect to online ads. So
    long as an online ad clearly specifies that a discountred price is only
    available online, I see no problem -- such discounts are increasingly common
    (and welcome!!). But it's not hard to see how someone who was unfamiliar
    with this market could be caught out.
    Pricing has nothing to do with freedom of speech. It's just business.
    One of the "market forces" at work **is** the law. Without legal protections
    for both buyers and sellers, there would be no trade.
     
    impossible, Dec 2, 2007
    #7
  8. Squiggle

    Richard Guest

    Errr, so if you were buying something you wouldnt make a lower offer?
    Wont work at the supermarket but will in almost any other store - except
    the $2 shop I guess.
     
    Richard, Dec 2, 2007
    #8
  9. Squiggle

    impossible Guest

    Like where? Antique stores? Second-hand book stores? Other small shops?
    Maybe. But most retail businesses use pricing models today that leave no
    room for haggling. For the consumer, t's take it or leave it. Consumers are
    "soverign", as the textbooks put it, only in so far as there is competition
    between sellers. Then, and only then, am I free to seek a better price. If a
    store discovers that all of their customers are shopping elsewhere because
    their prices are too high, then it may feel compelled to adjust its pricing
    model. But this is an impersonal effect of the aggregate, anonymous
    "market" -- not a negotiation.
     
    impossible, Dec 2, 2007
    #9
  10. Squiggle

    Alan Guest

    In my experience, many clothes shops (for example) allow their floor
    staff room to talk turkey between 10% and 20% - at the very least
    they'll throw in additional items for 'free'. You only have to ask!

    Most people don't bother - presumably they have more money than time -
    fair enough I guess, each to his own, but I think it's fun to practise
    your negotiation skills!

    I suspect you'd be wasting your time in a supermarket though!

    --

    Alan.

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    Alan, Dec 2, 2007
    #10
  11. Squiggle

    Bobs Guest

    All places like Dick Smiths, Noel Leemings etc will give you at least
    10% off any appliance if its not on special. You'll be a retard not to
    ask. It only takes a second and you can save a 100 bucks.
     
    Bobs, Dec 2, 2007
    #11
  12. Squiggle

    Alan Guest

    Completely agree - more money than sense comes to mind, but I do know
    a few people who regard it as being 'beneath' them to ask for a 'real'
    price.

    I would contrast that to my experiences in the UK or US where many
    more people are willing to haggle, just a local thing I suppose with
    more of a 'free market' / 'trading' culture in those countries. I
    suspect if you went to most Asian countries (for example) it would be
    even more common, but that's just my guess rather than based on my own
    experience.

    Interesting nevertheless.

    --

    Alan.

    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address.

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    Alan, Dec 2, 2007
    #12
  13. Squiggle

    impossible Guest

    It's a sucker's deal built into the the pricing model -- to make you think
    they're being reasonable and that you've struck a good bargain, when in fact
    you've paid exactly the price they budgeted for that item. Car dealers are
    renowned for these kind of shennanigans, pretending that they've sold you
    something "at cost" -- yeah, right.
     
    impossible, Dec 2, 2007
    #13
  14. My good Jewish friend Solly said to me, My boy, when you negoiate, leave
    a little bit of jam on the bread.

    Now what he was saying is that at the end of the day the seller has to
    make a living, so negotiate but know your place and don't be over the
    top, if you are over the top at best the dealer shafts you next time or
    at worst he goes broke and you are back to the beginning next time you
    want to buy
     
    collector«NZ, Dec 2, 2007
    #14
  15. Squiggle

    Richard Guest

    Stereo world, harvey norman, some furniture shop I cant recall, the
    bakery near home, several small computer shops have all bargained with
    me recently.

    Also there was a mechanic, and a builder, but those are services so you
    expect that to happen.

    If you dont come up with a counter offer, you are getting taken for a ride.
     
    Richard, Dec 2, 2007
    #15
  16. Squiggle

    impossible Guest

    Which is why the modern business model has made haggling over prices
    obsolete. From the point of view of both buyer and seller, it's simply too
    costly.
     
    impossible, Dec 3, 2007
    #16
  17. Squiggle

    impossible Guest

    Small shops, as I said, are an exception. It's all a bit of a game with
    them, and frankly I can't be bothered.
    My time is valuable, and I don't waste it haggling. Internet reserarch gives
    me the price I know is competive -- either a store posts that price (or
    lower) or I move on to someone else. For just that reason, most of my
    non-food shopping.nowadays is done online.
     
    impossible, Dec 3, 2007
    #17
  18. Squiggle

    Bobs Guest

    Exactly. So people are suckers not to ask for a "discount". Alan is
    correct though, I know quite a few people who refuse to ask for one as
    they think it's cheap. Idiots.
     
    Bobs, Dec 3, 2007
    #18
  19. Squiggle

    Bobs Guest

    LOL!! Mate, they all haggle! Actually, the store manager will tell their
    salespeople that they can take 10% (or whatever fixed rate the manager
    tells them) off the price if they think it will result in a sale. Of
    course, this will only work on items not on sale.

    Go to a place like Bond and Bond, find a fridge for a grand that's not
    on special, and I guarantee you that the salesperson will knock off a
    100 bucks. Quite amazing that people don't know this.
     
    Bobs, Dec 3, 2007
    #19
  20. Squiggle

    Bobs Guest


    And that's the attitude I'm talking about. Is your time worth $100 bucks
    for 20 seconds work? Thats all it takes.

    I bought a washing machine recently from Harvey Norman for $629. Marked
    price was over $700. Literally took me one question to get that deal.
    That is "And what discount can you give me on that price there?"

    That's all you need to ask in most cases.
     
    Bobs, Dec 3, 2007
    #20
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