NZ Linux users engage in Govt-MS bashing

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Alex Axolotl, Nov 25, 2004.

  1. Good question. Why would a local service require that remote RPC be
    enabled at all? Nobody's quite sure, but Blaster and others
    demonstrated that it's a really bad idea.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Nov 29, 2004
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  2. Somehow groups like Apache manage to do it. Much more quickly than MS
    ever have, too.
    Yes, Apache's less complex than Windows, but it's also cross-platform.
    Windows IS the platform.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Nov 29, 2004
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  3. Alex Axolotl

    AD. Guest

    RPC is/was needed for lots of LAN related things on both Windows and Unix
    - none of which were ever really intended for use on an untrusted network.
    On Windows it was used by most NT admin tools, Outlook to Exchange
    communication, and many other things. On Unix it was used for things
    like portmapper, NIS, NFS etc. There were differences between the two that
    stopped them inter-operating though.

    RPC was a major source of security problems on both Windows and Unix -
    just like most designs of that age.

    Cheers
    Anton
     
    AD., Nov 29, 2004
  4. *SNIP*

    Unix still uses RPC for all sorts of things. But it doesn't force
    applications to listen for remote RPC requests. MySQL, for example,
    uses RPC, but you have to specifically configure it to open a network
    socket. If you don't, it will happily function on the local machine
    without having to ever know that there's a network connection available.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Nov 29, 2004
  5. Alex Axolotl

    Cheetah Guest

    The New Zealand Open Source Society has been involved with a number
    Government projects, providing information about open source alternatives.
    We have experienced nothing but cooperation from the Government, and have
    no doubt that this cooperation will continue.

    This does not mean we do not have concerns about patents and their abuse,
    and we will be strongly encouraging politicians to think about implications
    of opening up New Zealand to the same kinds of patent law and patent abuse
    as experienced in the United States. The Government is well aware of these
    concerns as explicity stated in a Ministry of Economic Development report
    published this year.

    Personally I find this thread topic to be a rather unimaginative attempt to
    soil the name of the open source community. The NZOSS has a specific policy
    that states that we do not endorse specific political parties.
     
    Cheetah, Nov 30, 2004
  6. Alex Axolotl

    Cheetah Guest

    While it is perhaps true that unpopular open source projects come and go, I
    have no serious doubt that Linux, Firefox, Evolution, and many other
    established open source applications will be around for a long time yet,
    and will continue to be improved.

    The recent release of Suse 9.2 reinforces the fact that a open source
    platform is perfectly viable, not only from a technical perspective, but
    from a business perspective.
     
    Cheetah, Nov 30, 2004
  7. Alex Axolotl

    John Holley Guest

    GCC, GDB (1985)
    X Windows (1986)
    Perl (1987)
    BSD Unix (1977 -Early distributions)
    etc.

    Yeah Right Patrick.


    John
     
    John Holley, Nov 30, 2004
  8. Until recently (2.x) Apache on Windows was not as good as the Linux
    version. Apache is more than a Cygwin port like a lot of Linux apps are
    ported to Windows on.

    Anyway, my ISP said they had a lot of problems with the last Apache
    release and had to roll back...on Redhat.
     
    Patrick Dunford, Dec 1, 2004
  9. So what's the latest bleeding-edge OS available from Microsoft, then?
     
    Lawrence D¹Oliveiro, Dec 4, 2004
  10. longhorn alpha/beta or win2k3 server I guess...
    although XP media(player?) edition could also be thrown in there I guess.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Dec 4, 2004
  11. 04 Dec 2004 20:04:21 +1300, Lawrence D¹Oliveiro <[email protected]
    central.gen.new_zealand> says...
    When LH comes out next year it will be the bleeding edge.
    And it will still run on older slower hardware - without all the bells
    and whistles.
     
    Patrick Dunford, Dec 5, 2004
  12. *SNIP*

    2006, Patty. That's year AFTER next. About two years, given MS's
    history of releasing stuff in late Q3.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Dec 5, 2004
  13. Alex Axolotl

    John Holley Guest

    But then it won't be bleeding edge....can you say emulated Win2K?

    <http://www.microsoft-watch.com/article2/0,1995,1581842,00.asp>

    "Microsoft is expected to recommend that the "average" Longhorn PC
    feature a dual-core CPU running at 4 to 6GHz; a minimum of 2 gigs of
    RAM; up to a terabyte of storage; a 1 Gbit, built-in, Ethernet-wired
    port and an 802.11g wireless link; and a graphics processor that runs
    three times faster than those on the market today."

    Elsewhere I have read that 3Gz P4s with 1Gb ram will be the min. I
    gather you think that is older slower hardware today?

    John
     
    John Holley, Dec 5, 2004
  14. When LH comes out it will be the bleeding edge. Still true,
    regardless of whatever you can post to the contrary
     
    Patrick Dunford, Dec 5, 2004
  15. Patrick Dunford said the following on 5/12/2004 10:50 p.m.:
    ========================================================================
    Why do I get the feeling this thread will not die until you get the last
    word and nobody replies to it
    =========================================================================
     
    Collector»NZ, Dec 5, 2004
  16. Alex Axolotl

    steve Guest

    steve, Dec 5, 2004
  17. Alex Axolotl

    Guest Guest

    Of course any brand new release of any software by any organisation will
    be "bleeding edge".


    Divine
     
    Guest, Dec 5, 2004
  18. why emulated 2k?
    that seems a little strange considering that Intel and AMD will probably
    not be able to produce CPUs much over 3.4 due to heat/other limitations.
     
    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Dec 5, 2004
  19. PD: Will not
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    Dave - Dave.net.nz, Dec 5, 2004
  20. Yes, it will be. But today's hardware won't be. Today's bleeding edge,
    which is AMD64 FX55+ and P4 EE 3.4GHz CPUs, will be two years old, and
    considered rather slow.
    A lot of consumer motherboards these days can't take more than two GB of
    RAM, either. It's not at all unreasonable to expect MS to state that
    1.5GB will be the minimum (the trend seems to be that RAM requirements
    double every two years, and it will have been four years since the
    release of XP), which makes current hardware marginal, since an extra
    512MB on top of the OS requirements doesn't give you much to play with.

    --
    Matthew Poole Auckland, New Zealand
    "Veni, vidi, velcro...
    I came, I saw, I stuck around"

    My real e-mail is mattATp00leDOTnet
     
    Matthew Poole, Dec 5, 2004
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