Nokia to add lightning detector to mobile phone

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Ken Yates, May 24, 2007.

  1. Ken Yates

    Ken Yates Guest

    Ken Yates, May 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. Ken Yates

    Jerry Guest

    That could be handy, the last thing one hears in life is "beep beep
    Warning, you are about to be ZZZZZZZZTTTTTTT"
     
    Jerry, May 24, 2007
    #2
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  3. Ken Yates

    Kent Smith Guest

    "Oi! Duck!"
     
    Kent Smith, May 25, 2007
    #3
  4. Ken Yates

    Geopelia Guest


    When will someone invent a small mobile phone that just receives and sends
    phone calls? No extra bits and pieces. I'd probably consider buying one
    then, just for emergencies. But it would stay switched off unless I was away
    from home.

    Geopelia
     
    Geopelia, May 25, 2007
    #4
  5. Ken Yates

    Murray Symon Guest

    It begs the question - just what DO you do, given 1 or 2 seconds warning
    of a lightning strike (less 1/4 seconds reaction time). If you make a
    move, it might be towards the strike point. What if youre on top of a
    large metal structure? ... do you jump to save yourself?

    I don't have the answers, that's for sure!

    Murray.
     
    Murray Symon, May 25, 2007
    #5
  6. Ken Yates

    Jerry Guest

    Very quickly bend over and kiss your ass good-bye?
     
    Jerry, May 25, 2007
    #6
  7. I find there is usually considerably more warning of an impending strike.

    A vertical whip on a detuned AM radio is a good detector. Aside from the
    crashes of distant thunder you may also here tick tick tick ... where the ticks
    rise in frequency to a scream perhaps over minutes. By then it is too late to
    do anything. Given that the best place to be is in a vehicle and that such
    detectors are generally found in same one should concentrate on enjoying the
    show, though one strike did make me quite thankful for the New North
    Road/Dominion Road flyover.
     
    Mark Robinson, May 25, 2007
    #7
  8. Ken Yates

    Robert Cooze Guest

    I had one of those and telecom switched the network off! It could make
    calls and receive calls and the only feature was the 99 number telephone
    book in it

    --
    http://cooze.co.nz home of the RecyclerMan aka Robert Cooze

    / __/ / / / / /__ / / ___/ / __/ / / / |/ / /__ /
    / / / /_/ / / /_/ / _-' / __/ / / / /_/ / / /| / _-'
    ___\ ____/ ____/ /___/ /____/ /_/ ___\ ____/ /_/ /_/ |_/ /___/
     
    Robert Cooze, May 25, 2007
    #8
  9. Ken Yates

    bharmer Guest

    Yeah, like Air New Zeland tell us that the extra row of seats and 2cm
    less leg room is in response to customer demand. Have you ever heard
    more blatant dishonesty in your life?
     
    bharmer, May 26, 2007
    #9
  10. Ken Yates

    Tony in Oz Guest

    Saw one advertised on the sunrise breakfast show here this week, its a
    mobile and all it does is make and receive calls and texts, and has a phone
    book. It is obviously designed for older folk, as the number pad is a lot
    larger than your average as well. Ideal for the in-laws, I was thinking.
     
    Tony in Oz, May 26, 2007
    #10
  11. Ken Yates

    ~misfit~ Guest

    I really like my Nokia 1100, now superceded by the 1100i which is a royal
    PITA to use. The 1100 has a few more features than simple telephony such as
    easy to use texting and a quick-to-set alarm function which I find
    invaluable. However, by contemporary standards it's still a fairly simple
    (and extremely successful) phone. So what do Nokia do? Replace it with one
    with 'feature creep', two new 'soft' buttons, the 'labels' for which reduce
    the effective screen size by 30%, alarm function hidden deeper in the menu..

    I read of consumer backlash to 'function creep'. However, I don't see many,
    if any, manufacturers catering to the ever-increasing market of people who
    just want a simple device.

    Just because it's possible to do a thing doesn't mean that it's wise to do
    it.
     
    ~misfit~, May 26, 2007
    #11
  12. Ken Yates

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Is it GSM? Take a SIM card like Vodafones? Do you remember the brand?
     
    ~misfit~, May 26, 2007
    #12
  13. Ken Yates

    Jack Guest



    The Nokia 1110i H.N has them for $58..

    Beat that..
     
    Jack, May 26, 2007
    #13
  14. Ken Yates

    Barry Lennox Guest

    Aha, funny you should mention that, I was looking for a new small
    phone to replace my older-than-dirt Alcatel, noting that Motorola has
    got rid of the cute little C155 I looked at the 1100i and decided it
    was a POS. Squidgy buttons and nearly impossible-to-read labels.

    The bastards that develop these things should be forced to read every
    day:-

    "The Design of Everyday Things" by Donald A Norman.

    I guess I'l have to buy a used one on TradeMe or similar.
     
    Barry Lennox, May 26, 2007
    #14
  15. Ken Yates

    Tony in Oz Guest

    Sorry Shaun, I don't remember the details, but I will try to get time to
    research it. If I don't get time to, you could try googling "channel 7 " and
    "sunrise" and "the Gadget guy", they should have it on their website. Oh,
    its an aussie channel 7, by the way.
     
    Tony in Oz, May 26, 2007
    #15
  16. Ken Yates

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Ok, thanks Tony, I'll have a quick look with Google...
     
    ~misfit~, May 26, 2007
    #16
  17. Ken Yates

    Shane Guest

    I recall seeing something about lightening strikes in the Midwestern States
    of the US on the telly a while back (my god how vague is that???)
    From what I recall lightening strikes were occurring in fields (ie. baseball
    pitches) several miles away from storms, on the program they were
    discussing putting in detectors that measured the potential charge in the
    air, watching it rise to a danger point, or watching it rise rapidly
    indicated a lightening strike in the area was likely, and as such the kids
    playing the baseball were evacuated, until the danger passed.

    In the name of vagueness I did some googling
    http://www.publicaffairs.noaa.gov/grounders/lightningsafety.html
    While many lightning casualties happen at the beginning of an approaching
    storm, more than 50 percent of lightning deaths occur after the
    thunderstorm has passed. The lightning threat diminishes after the last
    sound of thunder, but may persist for more than 30 minutes. When
    thunderstorms are in the area, but not overhead, the lightning threat can
    exist when skies are clear.


    http://thorguard.com/news6.asp
    "In some professional golf tournaments, you can get as many as 50,000 people
    on a golf course, and you want as much warning as possible to get people to
    safety," said Stewart Williams, a meteorologist for the PGA.

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb4731/is_200406/ai_n17300145
    (popup warning)
    Watching a developing storm may be too late to protect patrons at golf
    courses, parks, pools, ball fields, and other outdoor sites. Lightning can
    strike far in advance of storm clouds or well after a storm seems to pass.
    Thor Guard Model L150 monitors intensity of electrostatic energy associated
    with lightning activity and predicts the probability of a first strike
    within a certain time and within a defined area up to 5 mi. in diameter.

    Right.. Im off to do the lawns...
     
    Shane, May 26, 2007
    #17
  18. But what if you don't have your donkey with you?

    If you're caught in the open and believe there's likely to be a strike
    nearby: feet together(1), crouch down(2), cover ears(3).

    (1) Because of the high energy involved in a lightning strike it doesn't
    immediately reach ground potential when it strikes. There will be a
    substantial voltage difference between the strike point and the ground
    some distance away. If your legs are apart there can be a difference of
    thousands of volts between them, which means the current will flow up
    one leg and back down the other (and through parts in between).

    (2) Crouching means you hopefully won't be the tallest target around.

    (3) WHAT!?! Plus covering your ears means you won't have your hands on
    the ground. Hand on the ground = current through the arm, chest, and leg,
    stopping your heart on the way.

    p.s. This is the advice I've read before and it sounds pretty sensible
    to me, but I haven't tried this myself. So if you want to try it and it
    works let me know. If it doesn't work you don't need to tell me.
     
    Roger Johnstone, May 27, 2007
    #18
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