Nikon to release a decent compact camera...but with a FIXED lens!!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    RichA, Feb 19, 2013
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Irwell Guest

    Irwell, Feb 20, 2013
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Mort Guest

    Hi,

    This brings back old memories. I have a Nikon 35 Ti film camera, with a
    fixed 35mm f 2.8 lens that was exceedingly sharp. The camera was built
    like an elegant army tank, and had retro needle pointer dials. The
    pictures that I took with it were quite sharp and free of visible
    aberrations. I used it as a pocket camera, when I could not bring my 14
    pounds of Nikon F equipment along. Its only problem was its high price.

    Mort Linder
     
    Mort, Feb 20, 2013
    #3
  4. RichA

    Mike S. Guest

    Got one too, as well as the competitor from Minolta (TC). Unfortunately,
    film-based photography was already on the way out by that time.
     
    Mike S., Feb 20, 2013
    #4
  5. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    I'd agree with you, had you written "fixed focus" (i.e., a box
    camera). On the other hand, a "fixed lens" compact can be a very
    capable device, whether film or digital.

    John
     
    John Turco, Feb 20, 2013
    #5
  6. RichA

    Rob Guest


    When they ran out of production and digital were well established you
    could buy a new one for peanuts.
     
    Rob, Feb 21, 2013
    #6
  7. RichA

    PeterN Guest

    PeterN, Feb 21, 2013
    #7
  8. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Well, making 4x6 prints from film negatives wasn't exactly a major
    task, even for a modest lens. I wonder how the Nikon lens in that
    camera would do with a 16MP sensor?
     
    RichA, Feb 21, 2013
    #8
  9. NO! RichA is wrong! RichA, the one who can predict how well
    any camera will ever sell, has been fooled by a rumor! RichA,
    the single expert of the world on what cameras are worthy and
    which are not, has been tripped up! This simply cannot be!!!


    I'll go commit suicide now, my world has been completely
    shattered. The shutter has closed on me; I'll go get myself
    pelted to death by expensive prime lenses. I'll guillotine off
    my fingers and toes with the electronic shutters of compact
    cameras till I bleed to death. I'll look into a mirror lens
    with a basilisk on the other side till I turn to stone.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Mar 1, 2013
    #9
  10. RichA

    John Turco Guest


    What's this "whilst" stuff about, eh?

    John
     
    John Turco, Mar 3, 2013
    #10
  11. RichA

    Guest Guest

    Guest, Mar 3, 2013
    #11
  12. RichA

    John Turco Guest

    John Turco, Mar 3, 2013
    #12
  13. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I rather like "whilst". It flows better in some sentences when used
    instead of "while". Used by an American, though, it could be taken as
    a pretentious affection. Some Brits get their knickers in a twist
    when fellow Brits use Americanisms, but I see nothing particularly
    wrong with cross-pondial sharing.

    Except "u"s, They can keep their extraneous "u"s.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 3, 2013
    #13
  14. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 3/3/2013 1:16 PM, nospam wrote:
    : > In article <kh077g$hcl$>, John Turco
    : >
    : >>> Might get a better Usenet server whilst you're at it...
    : >>
    : >> What's this "whilst" stuff about, eh?
    : >
    : > <http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whilst>
    : >
    :
    :
    : Note the "chiefly British" qualification, whereas
    : "George Kerby" is in Texas, USA.

    They (Texans) are going to revert to Shakespearian English when they secede
    from the Union. Part of putting the modern political era behind them. ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 3, 2013
    #14
  15. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I rather like "whilst". It flows better in some sentences when used
    : instead of "while". Used by an American, though, it could be taken as
    : a pretentious affection. Some Brits get their knickers in a twist
    : when fellow Brits use Americanisms, but I see nothing particularly
    : wrong with cross-pondial sharing.

    What's a "pondia"?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 3, 2013
    #15
  16. RichA

    Guest Guest

    that's not just in texas.
     
    Guest, Mar 3, 2013
    #16
  17. RichA

    nick c Guest

    John, the first time I ever met a Brit was in Manila, months after the
    war ended. I was in the 738 Combat MP Battalion, on patrol in Manila. My
    patrol territory was south of the Pasige (sp?) river.

    A couple of British ships entered Manila Bay and gave their crews shore
    leave. Bit sailors came ashore and a group hailed me as I was driving
    by; "Hey, Mr. MP" one yelled. I stopped to see what they wanted and one
    asked me where to go to have a good time.

    I asked them if they were "flush." That is, "have you a lot of money."
    They smiled and told me and I then told them to stay north of the river
    and they might live 'till the next day. South of the river my find them
    dead and broke, being hauled out of the river.

    Before leaving them I told them they were the first Brits that I've met
    and that they talked funny. I could hear them gawfaring and stammering
    as I drove away. Gee, one would think a Brit would talk English. Oh well
    ..... :))
     
    nick c, Mar 3, 2013
    #17
  18. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    "Cross-pondial" is a term in use in another newsgroup I follow that
    has regulars from several countries and continents. It translates
    roughly to "places somewhere else and where there's water between us".
    It's convenient.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 4, 2013
    #18
  19. RichA

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Not necessarily, though in this case it is. The Atlantic is just one
    pond. Anywhere across any large body of water is "cross-pondial".
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 4, 2013
    #19
  20. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >On Sun, 03 Mar 2013 16:08:02 -0500, Tony Cooper <>
    : >wrote:
    : >: I rather like "whilst". It flows better in some sentences when used
    : >: instead of "while". Used by an American, though, it could be taken as
    : >: a pretentious affection. Some Brits get their knickers in a twist
    : >: when fellow Brits use Americanisms, but I see nothing particularly
    : >: wrong with cross-pondial sharing.
    : >
    : >What's a "pondia"?
    :
    : "Cross-pondial" is a term in use in another newsgroup I follow that
    : has regulars from several countries and continents. It translates
    : roughly to "places somewhere else and where there's water between us".
    : It's convenient.

    IOW, it's a word contructed like "focial", "locial", "modial", "vernial",
    "florial", "ducial", "causial", "tonial", "continential", etc.? ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 4, 2013
    #20
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