Nikon D70: Dark Circular Marks in Sky

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Guest, Jul 28, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I've noticed that when I take photos on the beach over the ocean, I often
    get circular dark marks in the sky. I took a small crop from one of my
    shots and uploaded it to: http://members.aol.com/xtx99/problem.html If
    anyone can tell me what these 3 circular marks are in the sky over the ocean
    and how to fix the problem, I'd appreciate it. My lens is the D70's "kit"
    lens with lens hood and the shot was taken East (sun was in the West).
     
    Guest, Jul 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Pete D Guest

    Dirt on your sensor, try a blower or use a larger apperture and you will not
    see them, clone them out with Photoshop or whatever..
     
    Pete D, Jul 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    N.R. Guest

    your sensor has dust on it, bring it to cleaning (your local service center)
    or if you are brave enough, try to clean it in sterile conditions with a
    blower bulb (i did this to my D70 and it was ok after that). this is a
    common problem on all DSLR cameras.
     
    N.R., Jul 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    Vince Guest

    You have a dirty sensor thats all it is. i had the same problem. just clean
    the sensor.

    Vince...

    I've noticed that when I take photos on the beach over the ocean, I often
    get circular dark marks in the sky. I took a small crop from one of my
    shots and uploaded it to: http://members.aol.com/xtx99/problem.html If
    anyone can tell me what these 3 circular marks are in the sky over the ocean
    and how to fix the problem, I'd appreciate it. My lens is the D70's "kit"
    lens with lens hood and the shot was taken East (sun was in the West).
     
    Vince, Jul 28, 2005
    #4
  5. wrote:
    : I've noticed that when I take photos on the beach over the ocean, I
    : often get circular dark marks in the sky. I took a small crop from one
    : of my shots and uploaded it to
    : http://members.aol.com/xtx99/problem.html If anyone can tell me what
    : these 3 circular marks are in the sky over the ocean and how to fix the
    : problem, I'd appreciate it. My lens is the D70's "kit" lens with lens
    : hood and the shot was taken East (sun was in the West).
    :

    Well, it could be UFOs. Or ghosts of dark pirates looking for ships to
    plunder. :)

    But most likely it is dust on your camera lens or sensor. Dust spots tend
    to show up more noticeable when you have a light color, single color area.
    Which is why they show up on your beach photos with large expanses of sky.

    Since the spots are fairly sharp it is probable that they are on or near
    the sensor (like on the rear element of the lens). Dust on the front
    element tends to be more blurry. But these are the most likely locations
    for dust contamination. I would first try blowing the lens surfaces, front
    and back, with air (not breath) to hopefully dislodge any dry particles.
    Then take a test photo of a white wall or cloudless sky to see if the
    spots are gone. If not then I would follow your camera's manual in the
    procedure to clean the sensor (dry air first). Each step of the way,
    before going on to more drastic cleaning methods (cleaning fluids, pads,
    etc), take a test photo. If the problem is cleared up with easy methods,
    there is no need to go on to others. :)

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Jul 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Guest

    SimonLW Guest

    I also note quite a bit of noise in the sky. Try a lower ISO so you may use
    a wider aperture using the same shutter speed and dust should be less
    noticeable. Don't change lenses on the beach. There is usually a good breeze
    that carries sand and dust with it!
    -S
     
    SimonLW, Jul 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Guest

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Dust on your sensor. It's no big deal. Cleaning the sensor
    is something you'll have to do from time to time.

    Here's a link with everything there is to know about
    cleaning sensors :)


    http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/
     
    Jim Townsend, Jul 28, 2005
    #7
  8. Guest

    lars Guest

    I agree it's dust or some other crud on your sensor. A common occurrence.

    Another good site with info on cleaning (with brushes):

    http://194.100.88.243/petteri/pont/How_to/a_Brush_Your_Sensor/a_Brush_Your_Sensor.html

    There are various sources, at various prices. I picked up a cheap pair
    on eBay for about 15 bucks (search on 'clearskies brush'). Easy to do,
    and no problem with spots since...

    Lars
     
    lars, Jul 28, 2005
    #8
  9. Guest

    Alfred Molon Guest

    So many people reporting dust on the sensor here. The problem seems to
    be quite widespread
     
    Alfred Molon, Jul 28, 2005
    #9
  10. Guest

    Owamanga Guest

    Dust?

    Yep, its what people become when they die. The stuff is *everywhere*.
     
    Owamanga, Jul 28, 2005
    #10
  11. Guest

    Pete D Guest

    Yes, and?????????????????
     
    Pete D, Jul 28, 2005
    #11
  12. Guest

    lars Guest

    So is dust on lenses, but we don't palpitate over that, do we? Dust on
    your sensor is no bigger deal once you've done a cleaing yourself a
    couple of times...

    Lars
     
    lars, Jul 28, 2005
    #12
  13. Guest

    kombi45 Guest

    Read my post and the resulting thread regarding this from a few days
    ago and clean at your own risk, seriously:

    http://tinyurl.com/e25yc

    Best of luck,

    Ben
     
    kombi45, Jul 28, 2005
    #13
  14. Guest

    frederick Guest

    The fact that the dust is visible, and that the image is not very sharp
    indicates to me that a very small aperture was used - as does the
    motion blur which tells me that a fast shutter speed was not used. Above
    about f11, sharpness will be lost on a dslr like the D70 - and any dust
    on the sensor filter will become more visible. My guess is that if you
    had the aperture set at about f8 or f11, then the shutter speed for that
    shot would have been over 1/1000 sec, motion blur on the girls hands
    would not be visible, the image would have been very much sharper, and
    the dust would be far less visible, if at all.
    Don't get too fussy about dust. If it's just visible on a test shot at
    f22, but not visible at f11, then leave it. At some stage it will be
    visible in shots taken at normal aperture, and that's when cleaning it
    should be considered.
     
    frederick, Jul 28, 2005
    #14
  15. Half an hour later and I've only just stopped shaking. Had my D70 since
    December and had no intention of EVER looking for dust on the sensor.
    Curiosity got the better of me. Changed my desktop to white and took a
    photo. Zoomed in on the camera's LCD panel with the command dial and
    panned around the picture. One fairly big spec .... why me ?! Off to
    town, bought a nylon artist's brush, 14mm wide, orange & very soft, as
    well as some Dust Off. Washed the brush with liquid soap ( 2x ) and
    rinsed it off filtered water ( reverse osmosis ) Put camera on tripod
    pointing down 45 deg, removed lens and opened her up and was greeted by
    this gorgeous looking metallic green thing. Blew air through the brush
    and passed it over the top half of the sensor & repeated for the lower
    half. Checked .... gone !! oh no .... just moved to the other side. The
    second attempt had her clean as a whistle but I'm not ashamed to say I
    was a nervous wreck during and after that little episode. Total cost was
    $19,00. Cut a circular hole in the lid of a 35mm film canister and
    pushed the brush in, handle first, then snapped the lid onto the
    canister for storage .... nothing touching the fibers.

    Question time. Would it be advisable to repeat this procedure every
    couple of weeks to avoid any dust becoming stuck ( as opposed to
    floating ) on the sensor ?
    Pec Pads & methanol scare the **** out of me.
    Cheers
    Bernard
     
    Bernard Rother, Jul 29, 2005
    #15
  16. Guest

    kombi45 Guest

    Very good idea!
    Personally I would only do it when you see something in your pictures.
    Hell, I took pictures with visible dust for a month or so before
    getting it cleaned. When I saw it, I just edited it out in
    post-processing.
    Me too, my friend, me too. I'm taking it up with my shrink this
    afternoon, as a matter of fact.
     
    kombi45, Jul 29, 2005
    #16
  17. Guest

    Alfred Molon Guest

    Easier to clean a lens than a CCD or CMOS sensor. And dust on the lens
    does not show up in images. My point simply is that sensor dust is a
    bigger issue than people here are willing to admit.
     
    Alfred Molon, Jul 29, 2005
    #17
  18. Guest

    Alfred Molon Guest

    At what aperture is the diffraction limit for a camera like the D70 ?
     
    Alfred Molon, Jul 29, 2005
    #18
  19. Guest

    Kitt Guest


    snip


    Cut a circular hole in the lid of a 35mm film canister and

    Aha! Finally, a use for film. ;o)
     
    Kitt, Jul 29, 2005
    #19
  20. Guest

    ASAAR Guest

    It was amusing to see several of the staff at B&H falling over
    themselves trying to help a female customer several months ago. It
    had nothing to do with any particular feminine qualities she may
    have had. From their comments it was clear that these employees
    must have had much experience with film equipment from pre-digital
    days and relished what must be an increasingly rare opportunity to
    help this woman whose photo needs appeared to be quite modest than
    many of their other customers. And I have my own little collection
    of empty film canisters too. :)
     
    ASAAR, Jul 29, 2005
    #20
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