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Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Julie P., Jun 25, 2004.

  1. Julie P.

    Nemesissy Guest

    You're quite welcome, you fat pig.
     
    Nemesissy, Jun 25, 2004
    #81
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  2. Julie P.

    Nemesissy Guest

    What's the difference?
     
    Nemesissy, Jun 25, 2004
    #82
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  3. Julie P.

    GreyCloud Guest

    You certainly do demonstrate that through constant denial.
    Guffaw!! Finally, someone with a creative flare for feces. Mail me.
     
    GreyCloud, Jun 25, 2004
    #83
  4. In comp.os.linux.advocacy, Nemesis, the mad, gushing prick
    <-camera>
    wrote
    Is that all?

    62^12 = 3,226,266,762,397,899,821,056 (> 3*10^21)

    And this is a conservative estimate, as some of your names are
    far longer than 12 characters. 'Nemesis, the mad, gushing prick'
    in particular is 31 characters in length. I'm also not
    counting delimiters such as ',' in the analysis.

    HTH. HAND.
     
    The Ghost In The Machine, Jun 25, 2004
    #84
  5. Julie P.

    Diogenes Guest

    That would be misuse of English. Even in America it would be misuse to claim
    that.
     
    Diogenes, Jun 25, 2004
    #85
  6. Julie P.

    John Bokma Guest

    If you understand a bit more of the English language you could be aware
    that "or" often means "xor", ie:

    A B A XOR B
    F F F
    T F T
    F T T
    T T T

    But I guess you are just one of those n00bs that just discovered Usenet.
     
    John Bokma, Jun 25, 2004
    #86
  7. Julie P.

    John Bokma Guest

    Do you want an apple or a banana?

    <http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=or&r=67>

    " 1.
    1. Used to indicate an alternative, usually only before the
    last term of a series: hot or cold; this, that, or the other.
    2. Used to indicate the second of two alternatives, the first
    being preceded by either or whether: Your answer is either ingenious or
    wrong. I didn't know whether to laugh or cry.
    3. Archaic. Used to indicate the first of two alternatives,
    with the force of either or whether.
    2. Used to indicate a synonymous or equivalent expression:
    acrophobia, or fear of great heights.
    3. Used to indicate uncertainty or indefiniteness: two or three.
    "

    English is not the only language with this feature. In Dutch "of" is
    often an exclusive or.
     
    John Bokma, Jun 25, 2004
    #87
  8. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying Forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #88
  9. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #89
  10. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #90
  11. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #91
  12. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #92
  13. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #93
  14. Nemesis, after spending 3 minutes figuring out which end of the pen to use,
    wrote:
    Lying forger!
     
    Norwegian Formula, Jun 26, 2004
    #94
  15. Julie P.

    John Bokma Guest

    twit
     
    John Bokma, Jun 26, 2004
    #95
  16. Julie P.

    Nemesis Guest

    I prefer forging liar, but have it you way if it makes you happy.
     
    Nemesis, Jun 26, 2004
    #96
  17. Julie P.

    Nemesis Guest

    Not this time.
     
    Nemesis, Jun 26, 2004
    #97
  18. Julie P.

    Nemesis Guest

    Are you asking me how much change you should get?
     
    Nemesis, Jun 26, 2004
    #98
  19. Julie P.

    Nemesis Guest

    Constant? Surely only intermittent.
    Are you easily impressed?

    Mail me.

    Is that an invitation, or are you just happy to read me?
     
    Nemesis, Jun 26, 2004
    #99
  20. Julie P.

    Nemesis Guest

    Not this time.
     
    Nemesis, Jun 26, 2004
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