new router video

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by Trevor Wright, Dec 5, 2007.

  1. My Belkin wireless ADSL router packed up and I bought a new one, the
    same model. It connects fine, and reports a slightly higher down speed
    (eg 1216) than the old one; but I notice that streaming video (eg
    Youtube) and downloadable video (from education sites) (that's not a
    euphemism) is much slower - stop/start, buffering all over the place,
    etc.

    This is on the main, first computer, to which it is connected by cable.

    Is there some setting I've missed? Grateful for any suggestions.

    Please assume reasonable intelligence but absolutely no technical
    ability if kind enough to reply.
     
    Trevor Wright, Dec 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Trevor Wright

    Clint Sharp Guest

    Not going to help you much but a colleague has bought a Belkin wireless
    router recently and is having problems with latency sensitive stuff, can
    I ask what model you have because it may be a problem with that
    particular device.
     
    Clint Sharp, Dec 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. It's an F5D 76324. So was the old one, though it looked slightly
    different.
     
    Trevor Wright, Dec 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Trevor Wright

    deKay Guest

    Soni tempori elseu romani yeof helsforo nisson ol sefini ill des Wed, 5 Dec
    2007 15:56:10 +0000, sefini jorgo geanyet des mani yeof do
    uk.comp.home-networking, yawatina tan reek esk Trevor Wright
    I've just sent mine back. The port forwarding doesn't work, and it's a known,
    unfixed (and unfixable) issue.

    Not the problem you're having but if there's one thing wrong with it, there's
    probably more.

    deKay
     
    deKay, Dec 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Well, I don't know what latency is, or port forwarding...

    Can a router affect video streaming and download like this? When
    apparently OK otherwise? Or have I got some other problem?
     
    Trevor Wright, Dec 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Trevor Wright

    deKay Guest

    Soni tempori elseu romani yeof helsforo nisson ol sefini ill des Wed, 5 Dec
    2007 19:41:12 +0000, sefini jorgo geanyet des mani yeof do
    uk.comp.home-networking, yawatina tan reek esk Trevor Wright
    It can, although I don't have any latency issues with mine.

    deKay
     
    deKay, Dec 5, 2007
    #6
  7. Thankyou. What are "latency issues"?
     
    Trevor Wright, Dec 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Trevor Wright

    deKay Guest

    Soni tempori elseu romani yeof helsforo nisson ol sefini ill des Wed, 5 Dec
    2007 22:29:46 +0000, sefini jorgo geanyet des mani yeof do
    uk.comp.home-networking, yawatina tan reek esk Trevor Wright
    I think (although I'm no expert on this) it's basically a delay between a
    request and a response. For general web surfing and stuff a bit of latency
    isn't really an issue, but for things like online gaming it's critical that
    latency is low.

    deKay
     
    deKay, Dec 6, 2007
    #8
  9. Trevor Wright

    Clint Sharp Guest

    Latency is the time it takes your router to send received data to your
    PC, every device in the path between your computer and the site sending
    data has some latency and they all add up.

    On a router using NAT (yours almost definitely is) there's no way for
    someone to access your PC from the Internet. That's generally a good
    thing but in some circumstances it's useful if you can let Internet
    users or services access your PC (gaming, file sharing, remote access
    for you or friends etc.) so you can configure the router to send
    incoming requests for, for instance, a web server to a specific PC on
    your network, that's called port forwarding.
    Definitely, things like browsing the web or downloading email aren't
    latency sensitive, if it takes an extra second to arrive, it makes no
    difference but if the next chunk of data for your streaming video or
    Internet phone call takes an extra second then it all falls apart.

    Had a nice chat with a guy at a cable company recently whilst I was
    fixing his laptop, he reckons that an awful lot of the speed problems
    their customers report are caused by crappy routers that aren't fast
    enough to cope with 20Mb/s connections, attaching his company laptop
    directly shows a massive increase in speed, dog alone knows what's going
    to happen when they upgrade to 50Mb/s, funnily enough he mentioned
    Belkin as well...
     
    Clint Sharp, Dec 6, 2007
    #9
  10. Trevor Wright

    Alex Fraser Guest

    That's a good example, but the concept is more general: it's the delay
    between initiating something and observing the effect. In the context of
    networking, the term is typically used to mean round-trip time (RTT) or
    "ping" time (the "ping" utility measures RTT, and I assume the name comes
    from sonar ranging).
    It's true that low latency is critical for gaming, but it's no bad thing for
    web surfing either. As transfer rates go up, delays due to latency becomes a
    greater proportion of the elapsed time between requesting and completing the
    download of a page; in many cases it is the largest component today.

    The situation where latency really doesn't matter is downloading large
    files, where the time taken for the initial request is negligible compared
    to the time to transfer the data. (There are limits though; google
    "bandwidth delay product".)

    Anyway, getting back to the topic...

    Perhaps surprisingly, latency itself doesn't actually matter much for video.
    The real problem is *variation* in latency, but the effects of that can be
    avoided by sufficient buffering.

    One common cause of variation in latency is congestion of a network link -
    especially the upstream path in an ADSL or cable connection. Like rush-hour
    congestion on the roads, it takes longer for packets to get from A to B if
    they have to queue up; the difference is that the queues of packets can come
    and go in a fraction of a second. This makes streaming video more
    problematic if you are uploading, or to a lesser extent, downloading, at the
    same time. Different routers can behave differently in this regard as some
    can prioritise traffic.

    Another cause of variation in latency is packet loss, which causes data
    transfer to stall momentarily while the loss is identified and recovered
    from.

    Alex
     
    Alex Fraser, Dec 7, 2007
    #10
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