Networking two home PCs

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Tony \(UK\), Mar 16, 2005.

  1. Tony \(UK\)

    Tony \(UK\) Guest

    Hi,

    I used to be able to figure out most things, but I now find I have a
    degenerative neurological disease that makes things as if they are thinking
    through fog. Please don't flame me for being seeming to be a fool - I
    wasn't, but now........?

    My wife and I have a PC each in different rooms, roughly 20 metres apart,
    which we would like to network together and share printers and my 2Mb
    broadband connection (through an existing BT Voyager 100 modem). Both PCs
    have network cards 10/100 in them. Keeping the costs to the lowest is the
    aim.

    Would anyone be willing to guide me as to exactly what I need, as if you are
    talking to a total moron please? That way, I may be able to make sense of
    what I need and have to do, which I cannot do after weeks of trying
    different tutorials.
    Many thanks

    Tony(UK)
     
    Tony \(UK\), Mar 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tony \(UK\)

    Scrote Guest

    Tony, while I understand what you say about cost,£30/40 spent on a
    router will save a lot of problems, particularly in the future, it will
    save going through this scenario again if, for instance you have a
    serious glitch on one or both machines. It will also enhance your
    security by having NAT and a hardware firewall between you and the rest
    of the planet, something like this for instance.
    http://www.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/Shop/ShopDetail.asp?ProductID=1794&CategoryID=1&ShopGroupID=12
    --
    The physicist Leo Szilard once announced to his friend Hans Bethe that
    he was thinking of keeping a diary: "I don't intend to publish. I am
    merely going to record the facts for the information of God." "Don't
    you think God knows the facts?" Bethe asked. "Yes," said Szilard. "He
    knows the facts, but He does not know this version of the facts." -Hans
    Christian von Baeyer, Taming the Atom
     
    Scrote, Mar 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tony \(UK\)

    Tony \(UK\) Guest

    Scrote

    Thank you very much for the reply. Would you be able to give me some further
    advice as to what other things are needed please? Would I for example have
    to disable the WinXP firewall, and how would I go about wiring this router
    into my setup? What cables will I need?
    Sorry for being a complete nob, but as I've said before......
    If you'd rather mail me off-group, it's [email protected]
     
    Tony \(UK\), Mar 16, 2005
    #3
  4. Tony \(UK\)

    Avenger© Guest

    Two possibilities:

    1. A Wireless Access Point connected to your broadband modem and then
    a wireless card in your wife's PC.

    2. Running network cable from a network card in your PC to your wife's
    PC, running the cable from room to room or via a wall plate from one
    room to wall plate in the other, with the network cable running
    through the wall and/or roof cavity (between the wall plates).

    HTH
     
    Avenger©, Mar 16, 2005
    #4
  5. Tony \(UK\)

    ng_reader Guest

    Once you talk about two PCs, and *BOTH* having access to *ONE* Internet
    connection, you MUST have a router.

    You can set up one PC (the middle one) to act as a router, but it's just
    easier and better to buy a low cost router. Mine cost $10, which is about 5
    pounds. And it's wireless too, so I hard wire one machine, and bought a $35
    wireless card for the other.
     
    ng_reader, Mar 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Tony \(UK\)

    Scrote Guest

    In conjuction with Avengers advice, wireless adds cost to router plus
    you need a wireless card for one or both PCs. With the example I gave
    above, the only extra you will require is a lead to reach your wifes PC.
    The router will require power. It will also replace your modem(plus side
    of this is you have a spare incase of future problems :) ) Essentially,
    you plug the adslrouter into BT socket where your modem is at present
    then connect your PC with cable (normally) supplied. Routers genarall
    come in a zero(ish) configuration mode to get things up and running. You
    then have time to RTFM :) to enable the various security options,
    passwords etc. Most seem to have a web browser access to enable the
    various options etc etc. BTW ignore ng_reader his brain appears to have
    slipped as far south as is possible. Per my earlier post it CAN be done
    by thee are serious advantages, in your case for going for the router
    option. I will email you, it will be from a hotmail address.
    --
    The physicist Leo Szilard once announced to his friend Hans Bethe that
    he was thinking of keeping a diary: "I don't intend to publish. I am
    merely going to record the facts for the information of God." "Don't
    you think God knows the facts?" Bethe asked. "Yes," said Szilard. "He
    knows the facts, but He does not know this version of the facts." -Hans
    Christian von Baeyer, Taming the Atom
     
    Scrote, Mar 16, 2005
    #6
  7. Tony \(UK\)

    Mike Easter Guest

    You didn't say which tutorials you had read, but I recommend Tim Higgins
    old site Practically Networked. It has a lot of information both new
    and old, with modifications to old recommendations because of newer
    economical technology in routers since his first articles in 1998. This
    page http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/sharingcable.htm - The
    Five Steps to Network Sharing Nirvana! - starts with a discussion of
    network sharing without a router but with 2 NICs on the sharing computer
    to keep the networks, LAN & internet, separate and then 'modernizes'
    itself to include a hardware router, which is what everyone here is
    advising as well.

    I've done it with two IPs from the cableco, 2 cards in one PC and a
    simple hub and I've done it with a hardware router, and the hardware
    router is a much much better way of doing it. They are very economical
    and a lot of different ones are discussed and compared and advertised at
    the Higgins site.

    Higgins has nice diagrams of the separation of networks and security
    issues. Your newsreader OE is evidence that the machines being
    networked are likely both Win OSes, which is also a consideration in
    your choices of router.

    http://forums.practicallynetworked.com/
     
    Mike Easter, Mar 16, 2005
    #7
  8. Tony \(UK\)

    Mike Easter Guest

    <oops, somehow that took off before I was quite finished with it>

    Higgins has nice diagrams
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/sharemethod.htm of the
    separation of networks and security issues where you could simply follow
    the pathway of using a hardware router.

    Then I was also going to mention the forums for discussing networking
    and somehow the message got sent when I was looking for its address at
    http://forums.practicallynetworked.com/ Practically Networked Forums
     
    Mike Easter, Mar 16, 2005
    #8
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