MySQL 5 stability

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Adam Cameron, Jan 20, 2007.

  1. Adam Cameron

    Fred Dagg Guest

    Ok, that time it was funny....


    --
    Stupidest Comment of the Year Award:

    "People should take responsibility for their actions"

    - (Leftist) Matty F (7/1/2007), when explaining it was actually the quadbiker's fault that he was brutally murdered by Graeme Burton. According to Matty F, it was his fault that he was in the wrong place at the wrong time...
     
    Fred Dagg, Jan 23, 2007
    #21
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  2. Adam Cameron

    Steve Guest

    The perfect answer! If you want an open source answer to ms access, use
    mysql. But, if you need a mature, powerful rdbms that's free, use
    postgresql.

    After all, you only got views a couple of years ago, and version 5 finally
    delivered stored procs, which I was using under sybase in the 1980's
     
    Steve, Jan 23, 2007
    #22
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  3. Adam Cameron

    Enkidu Guest

    Sometimes it's fun.

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 23, 2007
    #23
  4. Adam Cameron

    Enkidu Guest

    Oh, a bit of humour....good one Fred.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 23, 2007
    #24
  5. Adam Cameron

    Enkidu Guest

    Equating MySQL to Access is not fair.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 23, 2007
    #25
  6. Adam Cameron

    Dave Doe Guest

    Or Microsoft SQL Server Express.
     
    Dave Doe, Jan 23, 2007
    #26
  7. Adam Cameron

    Steve Guest

    To Access?

    Or should I just respond with 'yes it is?'
     
    Steve, Jan 23, 2007
    #27
  8. Adam Cameron

    Enkidu Guest

    Access is a GUI interface to a proprietary data engine. MySQL is a
    frontend to an open source data engine.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 24, 2007
    #28
  9. Adam Cameron

    Steve Guest

    No. MySQL is an open source data engine. Not a front end to one. MySQL
    has, over the last couple of years, gained basic security and performance
    basics like views and stored procedures, which puts is 15+ years behind.

    So, they are useful for playing with, no more. One is directed at a single
    user environment, and the other is not mature enough to be taken seriously.

    If you want a decent rdbms, then you need to look elsewhere... Oracle,
    DB2, Informix, Ingres, Postgres.
     
    Steve, Jan 24, 2007
    #29
  10. I have clients using MySQL in mission-critical and performance-critical
    situations every day. I have come to depend on the fact that its robustness
    is ironclad. I even had a disk partition fill up once, and while MySQL
    stopped adding new records, it didn't lose the ones that were already
    there.

    In short, MySQL is tough enough to take anything I care to throw at it. You
    can't ask more than that from a good tool.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 24, 2007
    #30
  11. Adam Cameron

    Fred Dagg Guest

    I hope these "clients" don't pay you.

    Sure, as the backend for a website it's ideal - it's fast, slim, and
    relatively reliable.

    But for mission-critical applications? If that's true, you're even
    more of a fool than I thought - and that's saying something.


    --
    Stupidest Comment of the Year Award:

    "People should take responsibility for their actions"

    - (Leftist) Matty F (7/1/2007), when explaining it was actually the quadbiker's fault that he was brutally murdered by Graeme Burton. According to Matty F, it was his fault that he was in the wrong place at the wrong time...
     
    Fred Dagg, Jan 24, 2007
    #31
  12. Adam Cameron

    Enkidu Guest

    Really? So they have done away with the MyISAM engine?
    DB2 maybe. Oracle is a bloated stagnant piece of ..... The other two
    I've not used so far as I'm aware but at least one is an ancestor of
    PostgreSQL, isn't it?

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Jan 24, 2007
    #32
  13. Adam Cameron

    AD. Guest

    Or more accurately "MySQL is a frontend to open source data engines."
    No Cliff was bascially right. MySQL is the front end and not a data
    engine itself. The data engines are all pluggable with completely
    different features and for the most part written by different groups.

    When people say MySQL now has those "new" features, what they mean is
    that one of the pluggable backends now provides those "new" features.
     
    AD., Jan 24, 2007
    #33
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