Multiple Websites on Single 2k BOX Which router please!?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by 2hawks, Oct 30, 2006.

  1. 2hawks

    2hawks Guest

    I am trying to determine what cisco router is the correct choice for
    the following scenario:

    IN VIA DSL LINE

    < Insert Cisco Router Here :) >

    Windows 2000 Server hosting 5 websites with static IPs (one NIC)

    any suggestions? my thanks.
     
    2hawks, Oct 30, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. 2hawks

    Chad Mahoney Guest

    You could look into any 1700, 1800 series routers for that purpose. You
    would want the ADSL WIC card for the expansion slot. As far as the
    hosting of 5 websites via static IP is determined on the webserver using
    "host headers" to direct each request to the proper website on the
    server. It all depends what your traffic looks like.
     
    Chad Mahoney, Oct 30, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. 2hawks did not actually say ADSL, and ADSL is usually not a good choice
    for a server, being restricted to 640 Kbps upload.

    The actual xDSL technology that 2hawks needs might not be supported
    on the 1700 (and possibly not 1800 either).

    On the other hand, 2hawks might only need a Cisco 673, for SDSL at
    up to 1.18 Mbps symmetric.

    To give a complete answer, we need to know the technology and the
    line rate, and we need to know of any other expectations that will
    be placed upon the router (e.g., is it expected to be running firewall
    functions? Is it expected to support Netflow for traffic analysis?)
     
    Walter Roberson, Oct 30, 2006
    #3
  4. 2hawks

    bthetford Guest

    Using IIS with each site on its own IP, host headers aren't necessary.
    Host headers are only necessary if multiple sites will be sharing an IP
    address.
    You shouldn't need a router if it's all going to one box, though. Why
    the router?
    Just set the NIC on the server to have all five of those IPs and you're
    all set. Save the $1000 for a 1800...
     
    bthetford, Oct 31, 2006
    #4
  5. Hello bthetford,
    And this is what you'll get using DSL - one IP address from the provider.
    When you NAT everything has to go to the same server IP address.
     
    Helge Olav Helgesen, Oct 31, 2006
    #5
  6. 2hawks

    bthetford Guest

    He said he has 5 static IPs.

    We have cable internet at our place of business but have a block of
    several IPs.

    The only reason you'd need a router for this is if you have multiple
    nics that need to connect to the internet line.
    In our situation, we have an 1811 to handle that, but that's because
    there are separate NICs.
    If we had just one server with one NIC, we wouldn't need the 1811.
     
    bthetford, Oct 31, 2006
    #6
  7. 2hawks

    bthetford Guest

    He said he has 5 static IPs (at least that's how I interpreted it).

    We have cable internet at our place of business but have a block of
    several IPs.


    The only reason you'd need a router for this is if you have multiple
    nics that need to connect to the internet line.
    In our situation, we have an 1811 to handle that, but that's because
    there are separate NICs.
    If we had just one server with one NIC, we wouldn't need the 1811.
     
    bthetford, Oct 31, 2006
    #7
  8. 2hawks

    CK Guest

    Hi,

    Mr. WALTER has already given you the answer. Go through his post

    What services are you expecting from Router?
    What is your current line speed which is most important right now for
    furture improvement

    CK
     
    CK, Nov 1, 2006
    #8
  9. I know it isn't apparent from my generic "anywhere in the world" email
    address, but I happen to be in one of the cultures in which the custom
    is the surname is last and the personal name is first; so I am Mr.
    Roberson, rather than the much more common (by proportion of world
    population) Mr. Walter. But if you prefer or find it easier, you can
    refer to me by my nick-number, which is six double-five three two one.
     
    Walter Roberson, Nov 1, 2006
    #9
  10. 2hawks

    2hawks Guest

    Thank you 655321... :p and all those who replied.

    I suppose I should have been far more precise in my rather simple post.
    I am very much NOT and IT guy more of a hack programmer.

    We have 5 static IPs for 5 different businesses.
    We have 1 Windows 2000 Server which hosts the 5 sites.
    We have one NIC.
    We have one DSL line .

    We need effective (cost and function) security.

    Originally someone had taken 4 Netgear FVS318s that were lying around
    and tried to make a firewall/routing system from that - yikes. Didn't
    work but only becuase the Windows 2000 server has one gateway and only
    one to return on thereby losing the original packet return info on
    everything except the main site IP.

    So we need to get a better system. I am sure this is still incomplete
    information but perhaps a bit more.
    2H
     
    2hawks, Nov 11, 2006
    #10
  11. Okay, but in order for us to recommend a model, we need to know
    what kind of DSL, and what the line rate is on the DSL. You mention
    the DSL line but if you don't already have the router in place, is
    the implication that you have a "DSL modem" that is providing
    you with an ethernet connection? If so, did you want the new router
    to take over for the DSL modem, or is it okay to leave the DSL
    modem in place?

    We need to know what kind of security protections you need.
    Are you looking for anti-virus? Protection against inside people using
    P2P programs?

    Based upon what you have said, I'm not sure that you actually need
    a router at all: if you have a DSL modem that provides ethernet,
    then what you are looking for might just be a firewall.
     
    Walter Roberson, Nov 11, 2006
    #11
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.