msconfig?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Robert Baer, Dec 24, 2013.

  1. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Had some spare time, decided to try your msconfig diagnostic mode
    trick to see what is happening with these glitches.

    Well, OS is Win2K "SP5"; no msconfig.

    Now what?
     
    Robert Baer, Dec 24, 2013
    #1
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  2. Robert Baer

    Paul Guest

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSConfig

    "Windows 95 and Windows 2000 users can download the
    utility as well, although it was not designed for them."

    They recommend copying the file from a WinXP installation here.

    http://www.techadvice.com/win2000/m/msconfig_w2k.htm

    http://www.sysopt.com/showthread.php?122984-can-t-run-msconfig-on-win2K

    I can't find any mention it was available as a separate download
    direct from Microsoft. So I don't have a pointer to a "clean" copy.

    Using the virtual machine files here, you should be able to find a
    VHD with the file inside it. Which is an absurd way to get the
    file. I'm not even sure you'd have a way to examine a VHD.
    The VHDMount utility barely runs on WinXP. So even if you
    used virtual machines as a "source of files", you still have the
    problem of accessing them. (The 7ZIP utility won't open a VHD.)

    VHD files come in two types. "Fixed capacity" virtual drives.
    Which are perilously close to being a sector-by-sector copy of
    a real partition. The "expanding" kind though, are not
    exactly the same as a disk image, they use much less space, and
    only contain copies of the in-use sectors. And as such, they're
    not suited to easy hacking. You'll hardly ever find a fixed capacity
    one for download, whereas the expanding capacity ones are quite popular.

    You would need to hunt down a VHD utility of some sort, to make
    more progress using that route.

    If you had a WinXP SP3 installer CD, you should also be
    able to find the file on there. Installer CDs have the files
    compressed, with the extension on the file modified.

    *******

    If you had Windows 7 installed on a partition, you'd then
    be able to run a virtual machine software, and be able to
    access files as contained in the VMs on this page. I have
    several images from here, that I've downloaded. The download
    takes forever on a slow link like I've got. I think the
    last one I did, took five hours.

    http://www.modern.ie/en-us/virtualization-tools#downloads

    That is how I can run Vista or Windows 7, on my WinXP machine,
    long enough to answer questions. I don't generally leave them
    running for too long. As for "computing" in such an environment,
    my VM software only uses a single core, and I can "compute" faster
    in the native OS. It depends on which VM software you use,
    as to whether it has a core limitation or not. VirtualBox allows
    lots of cores to be used, relative to some other lesser softwares.
    It's just a pain to work with sometimes.

    Paul
     
    Paul, Dec 24, 2013
    #2
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  3. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Thanks!
     
    Robert Baer, Dec 24, 2013
    #3
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