MS fudges deals again....Birmingham actually intends to use moreopen source and not less

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thingy, Nov 30, 2006.

  1. thingy

    impossible Guest

    Yes. Stock exchanges have been running proprietary *nix systems for
    decades. Seems that LSE wanted to upgrade its old system, but instead
    of opting for the free version of *nix that's so dear to you -- or any
    other *nix system -- they chose Microsoft Windows Server. Imagine
    that!
     
    impossible, Dec 3, 2006
    #21
    1. Advertisements

  2. Precisely. Not too many cases of people choosing Dimdows over Linux these
    days, are there?
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Dec 3, 2006
    #22
    1. Advertisements

  3. thingy

    impossible Guest

    Glad we agree.
     
    impossible, Dec 3, 2006
    #23
  4. Interesting that they replaced their decades old system with the latest M$
    Windows OS.

    Kinda suggests that they don't actually NEED the power of a Unix system to
    run something that was happily running on hardware that was more than a
    decade old.

    It will, however, be interesting to see how that chances their reputation
    for reliability.


    Aquilegia Alyssum
     
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Dec 3, 2006
    #24
  5. thingy

    AD. Guest

    The NZX are also big Debian users. If Oracle supported Debian, they
    might not need RedHat ;)
     
    AD., Dec 3, 2006
    #25
  6. Linux is the solution that offers the least long term pain - especially
    for most non-power-user persons.[/QUOTE]

    Interesting point. I have no view on the right or wrong of what you said ...
    but I will comment on "long term".

    I believe that, for most people, "long term" means "short term" ... ie a
    year or 2 maybe. Chack out any kind of planning done by anyone or any
    company. A 5 year plan is a great rarity ... and more so if it reflects any
    kind of reality.
    Many observed decisions make little sense in the real "long term". :)
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Dec 4, 2006
    #26
  7. 5 years is ONE release of M$ Windows.

    Are you suggesting that the timeframe of ONE release from Micro$oft
    equates to "long term"?

    Given the direction that M$ is taking it's software - DRM an' all that,
    anybody actually choosing to install M$ Windows Vi$ta will mean in effect
    choosing to have M$ dictate what you can do with your computer.


    Aquilegia Alyssum
     
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Dec 4, 2006
    #27
  8. thingy

    daemon9 Guest

    96, 98, and in 2001.

    -d9
     
    daemon9, Dec 4, 2006
    #28
  9. Quite the contrary. I consider 5 years short term. What I'm saying is that
    many (people and companies) often consider that long term.
    ... and I made my choice a few years ago for those very reasons among
    others. Other people can do likewise. Once the burden is sufficiently
    onerous, I suspect many will. But really, I don't care if others want to
    make crappy decisions. If they don't affect me, why would I ? :)

    ... and BTW, please do not turn into a zealot ... they are a TWOT and are
    regularly killfiled by the saner posters. That would be a shame.
    ..
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Dec 5, 2006
    #29
  10. I think you'll find that all parts of Linux have changed massively since
    2001.


    Aquilegia Alyssum
     
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Dec 5, 2006
    #30
  11. Crappy decisions are what has caused SPAM to be so prevalent, and what has
    caused anti-virus software to be so essential on Windows computers.

    Surely that affects everybody. :eek:)


    Aquilegia Alyssum
     
    Aquilegia Alyssum, Dec 5, 2006
    #31
  12. Nope :)

    It's like laws ... once a particularl law is sufficiently ignored by most
    people (like the archery practice one :) ) it will be repealed. Neither will
    the police bother to enforce stupid laws. Good job.
    If MS (or anyone) decide to make bad choices in what or how they provide,
    they will die and be forgotten. They will either listen or remove themselves
    from the gene pool.
     
    Bruce Sinclair, Dec 6, 2006
    #32
  13. The 2.6 Linux kernel only reached production release in 2003. Among other
    things, that has massive improvements in hardware support and hot-plugging,
    with the udev and HAL mechanisms etc. Much nicer than having to juggle
    drive letters, I think most sane people would agree. :)
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Dec 8, 2006
    #33
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.