making lemons out of lemonade

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Jacoubowsky, Jul 31, 2005.

  1. You know how it is, when you've got a really special event, one where you're
    hoping to get "the picture", the one that will perfectly captures everything
    about that particular moment in time? Sometimes you get it
    (http://www.chainreaction.com/tdf03oldmanyoungboy.htm or
    http://www.chainreaction.com/france03racephotos.htm#tourmalet) but often you
    not only don't get the shot, but also miss out on whatever it was that made
    the event so special, because you made the decision to focus on taking
    photos rather than experience the event.

    A couple weeks ago I was in France, doing my usual follow-the-Tour de France
    thing, hauling 12 pounds of camera gear up the Col d'Aubisque (by bicycle),
    hoping for just the right picture. I didn't get it (of course not,
    particularly when you borrowed your brother's L-series lens that you're
    using for the first time and really don't have a clue), but looking over the
    photos later on, I start thinking of how you can make lemonade out of the
    lemons I took. Looking over the many photos, trying to find a theme that I
    might make something out of. Eyewear. Do you wear your shades up he hill, or
    remove 'em? And if you remove 'em, where do you put them?

    So of course I put up a web page-
    http://www.chainreaction.com/tdf05shades.htm

    (The things you do on a long flight back from Europe...)

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
    Mike Jacoubowsky, Jul 31, 2005
    #1
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  2. Mike Jacoubowsky

    Padme Guest

    I don't know what makes me more nauseous, you bragging about your bad
    photographs or plugging your web site.

    Blaming why you did not get the "good shot" because you borrowed you
    brother's lens is also very lame. I sold images I took with a 35mm point
    and shoot.

    You are arrogant and your web site is overly sentimental.
     
    Padme, Jul 31, 2005
    #2
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  3. Mike Jacoubowsky

    Frank ess Guest

    People with sensitive stomachs (and a tendecy to whinge about the
    pattern in the carpet) really shouldn't read Usenet.
     
    Frank ess, Jul 31, 2005
    #3
  4. I don't know what makes me more nauseous, you bragging about your bad
    Not to worry. When you're experiencing something you think is bad, you can
    relax in the knowledge that nothing bad lasts forever. (From someone else's
    website, at http://www.4truths.com/first.html).
    You're confusing "blame" with amused self-stupidity. There's a lesson for
    others in what happened to me- don't try out new stuff on something
    important. Stick with what you know.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
    Mike Jacoubowsky, Aug 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Mike Jacoubowsky

    Stacey Guest

    Stacey, Aug 1, 2005
    #5
  6. I know what you mean about ruining a "good time" at an event being too
    worried about photographing it.

    I spent most of the total eclipse, a few years back, trying and failing to
    get a decent photo. Now when people ask me what the eclipse was like, I
    can't remember much more than the logistics of that picture.

    Keith
     
    Keith Sheppard, Aug 1, 2005
    #6
  7. I know what you mean about ruining a "good time" at an event being too
    Isn't that the truth!

    From a piece on the website about watching the Tour de France on a mountain
    stage-

    "At this point you have to make a decision (one you should have made some
    time ago, but is now up for grabs). Do you watch the events unfold, get
    caught up in the moment and cheer your heroes on... or do you take photos?
    It's an unfortunate fact that you really can't do both... to take decent
    photos requires that you become almost detached from what's going on. Timing
    is everything! Those who are there to stand and cheer will be able to
    replay the event in their mind, over and over. The photographer, if he/she
    doesn't get the shot, loses everything. There's no half-way."

    For the entire text- http://www.chainreaction.com/tdfwatching.htm

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
    Mike Jacoubowsky, Aug 1, 2005
    #7
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