Linux is as buggy as Windows

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Martin C.E., Sep 22, 2003.

  1. Hey, DCB=(LRECL=80,BLKSIZE=0,DSORG=PS,RECFM=FB) should be
    intuitive for anybody!

    Chris Mattern
     
    Chris Mattern, Sep 27, 2003
    #21
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  2. Martin C.E.

    Leythos Guest

    How about a step even further back:

    Move.B #0,Dx Clr.B Dx 8 cycles, 2 bytes
    Move.W #0,Dx Clr.W Dx 8 cycles, 2 bytes
    Clr.L Dx Moveq #0,Dx 2 cycles
    Move.L #0,Dx Moveq #0,Dx 8 cycles, 4 bytes
    Move.L #0,Ax Suba.L Ax,Ax 4 cycles, 4 bytes
    Move.L #[-128..127],Dx Moveq #[-128..127],Dx 8 cycles, 4 bytes

    Or things like this:
    begin: push hl ;Save
    call clear
    ld hl,0 ;Get top of memory
    ld b,0 ;HIGH$
    ldos @high$
    dec hl
    push hl
    ld de,buffer ;Start of buffer
     
    Leythos, Sep 27, 2003
    #22
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  3. My memory is failing<g>. Is that 780?
     
    David W. Hodgins, Sep 27, 2003
    #23
  4. :> Move.B #0,Dx Clr.B Dx 8 cycles, 2 bytes
    :> Move.W #0,Dx Clr.W Dx 8 cycles, 2 bytes
    :> Clr.L Dx Moveq #0,Dx 2 cycles
    :> Move.L #0,Dx Moveq #0,Dx 8 cycles, 4 bytes
    :> Move.L #0,Ax Suba.L Ax,Ax 4 cycles, 4 bytes
    :> Move.L #[-128..127],Dx Moveq #[-128..127],Dx 8 cycles, 4 bytes

    :> begin: push hl ;Save
    :> call clear
    :> ld hl,0 ;Get top of memory
    :> ld b,0 ;HIGH$
    :> ldos @high$
    :> dec hl
    :> push hl
    :> ld de,buffer ;Start of buffer

    :My memory is failing<g>. Is that 780?

    The first one looks to be 680x0, with each 'x' being a number -- data
    registers for the Dx, address registers for the Ax. When I first read it,
    it appeared to be somewhere around PDP11, but PDP11 did not have
    Moveq (Move Quick), did not have Suba (Subtract Address), and
    did not have Byte (.B), Word (.W) -and- Long (.L) extensions.

    The second would be something in the *80* series, like Z80 or 8080 or
    80x86. The 'de' registered had appeared by the time of the 8086, but
    I wouldn't swear it existed at the time of the 8080. I'm going to
    guess Z80.
     
    Walter Roberson, Sep 27, 2003
    #24
  5. Martin C.E.

    Leythos Guest

    Exactly correct - the 68000 series.
    Z80 is also correct.

    Sheesh, I had to pull up old paper print-outs to find this, none of my
    large format diskettes fit in my 5.25" floppy :)
     
    Leythos, Sep 27, 2003
    #25
  6. Martin C.E.

    Tore Lund Guest

    Since we are already off topic, maybe you could divulge what LDOS is?
    A macro or something? I cannot see it in my Z80 reference.
     
    Tore Lund, Sep 27, 2003
    #26
  7. Martin C.E.

    cquirke Guest

    Ah, that brings a tear to my eye :)

    Cue geek joke...

    "What's the opcode for "PUSH BC" ?
    ' I dunno... what? '
    "C5!"
    <everyone ROTFL>

    Push BC is a Z80 asembler mnemonic that codes to hexadecimal C5.

    Why this is funny is because Clive Sinclair (originator of the Black
    Watch, ZX80, ZX81, ZX Spectrum and QL computers) also invented the C5,
    a lightweight personal transport that took off like a Ford Edsel
    without an engine. Push BC can also be read as "Push Bicycle"...

    ....I guess you had to have been there

    We used to do horrible things like...

    LD A,I
    LD (IXH), A
    LD (IXL), C
    PUSH IX
    RET

    :)




    Sucess-proof your business! Tip #37
    When given an NDA to sign, post it on your web site
     
    cquirke, Sep 27, 2003
    #27
  8. Martin C.E.

    Leythos Guest

    It's a key for the specific compiler I use to use. It has nothing to do
    with the instruction set. I can't remember what it does - links to the
    first DOS segment (not MS DOS).
     
    Leythos, Sep 27, 2003
    #28
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