Linksys router and modem, no one can connect to me

Discussion in 'Network Routers' started by Nero, Jan 14, 2005.

  1. Nero

    Nero Guest

    Have a Linksys ADSL2MUE modem and a Linksys BEFSR11 v2 router connected to
    my only pc.
    Can connect and send/get email and do the usual internet things but people
    who need to connect to me via VOIP/messenger/netmeeting or anything that
    uses my IP address to connect to me cannot.
    The modem assigns private ip addresses, no prob, that is passed on to the
    router and on to the pc.
    I have set the router to DMZ mode, set my pc lan to static IP, both have the
    same ip address but still no one can call/connect to me.
    Anyone know why that should be?
    The router can be set to upnp but most of the programs used to call
    me/connect to me are not upnp.
     
    Nero, Jan 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. Which IP address are they trying to use? You have two. The inside IP address
    assigned by the router to the PC and the IP address assigned to the router
    by your ISP. Anybody wising to connect to you MUST use the IP address your
    ISP assigns to the router. The inside IP address will not work. Your router
    I think has a status page accessible using the web based setup screens. You
    can find the address assigned by your ISP to the router there.

    Also for your own security your computer should NOT be on the DMZ port. It
    should be behind your firewall and use port forwarding, a static inside IP
    address, and open only the ports you need for the VOIP/messenger/netmeeting
    applications.

    One final thing. Your address assigned, by your ISP, is normally NOT a
    static address. That means that it can change, and when it does people won't
    be able to connect to you since the address is valid any more. to fix that
    you can use a service that privides a service called Dynamic-DNS to fix
    that. Check out www.dyndns.org for more info
    --
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    Wireless Network
    Mobile computing
    on the go brought
    to you by Micro$oft
     
    Leland C. Scott, Jan 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. Nero

    Nero Guest

    The IP address assigned to the router is a private one that the modem
    assigns because this modem only assigns private IP addresses.
    There are a lot of modem router/modems that only assign private IP
    addresses.
    The IP address assigned to me from my ISP is a static one and always has
    been regardless of what ISP I have been with. most ISP's give static IP
    addresses and all the ones I have ever been with have and do.
    It is not possible for people to connect to my pc using the IP address given
    by my ISP if the modem only assigns a private IP address to the pc or
    router.
    There is NO problem with having my pc as the DMZ host as I can use software
    firewall if I need and always have used a normal adsl modem(no router, no
    built in firewall) until now and a software firewall.
    Regarding port forwarding, I have tried that and yes, only the ports needed
    but still no one can connect to my pc and the same goes for the DMZ thing.
    I assumed that if I foreward the ports needed to my pc then people should be
    able to connect to my pc.
    This is not so and I do not know why.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #3
  4. Why on earth would your "modem" be issuing IP addresses? Modems normally
    don't do anything more than translate data to and from the transmission
    medium, your phone line or cable. The address you get should be assigned by
    your ISP's DHCP server and is passed on to your PC or router, which ever is
    connected behind the modem. The PC and the router both have a DHCP client
    that requests the above configuration information from the DHCP server, the
    one at your ISP, not the modem.

    http://www.dhcp-handbook.com/dhcp_faq.html
    ISP's normally have a bank of addresses assigned to them for their exclusive
    use, which they then assign to their customers on a dynamic basis. If you
    change to another ISP I'll bet they are on another subnet than the last ISP
    you had so I find it hard to believe your IP address has never changed
    unless you have your IP registered with the necessary Internet authority.

    http://www.iana.org/ipaddress/ip-addresses.htm
    Not the dial up ISP's. Most cable Internet service providers also use
    dynamic IP's. They, IP addresses, may remain the same for weeks or months at
    a time, but can and do change when the ISP requires it. I have Comcast and
    mine has changed once or twice over the several years I've had the service.
    In fact if you want a "static IP" they will charge you more money and has to
    be setup special.

    http://www.dslreports.com/faq/7266
    Mine works just fine. I use the DDNS service at www.dyndns.org and the DDNS
    update function in my router to keep the domain I selected updated with the
    current IP address on their DNS server. I use the domain name to access a
    couple of private servers on my home LAN all the time.
    They should if they are using the right IP address and you forwared to right
    ports to right inside IP addresses.
    Read the info at the URL below for Netmeeting specific help.

    http://www.homenethelp.com/help/netmeeting-router.asp

    --
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    Wireless Network
    Mobile computing
    on the go brought
    to you by Micro$oft
     
    Leland C. Scott, Jan 15, 2005
    #4
  5. Nero

    Nero Guest

    There are more than one or two ethernet ADSL modems that DO assign IP
    addresses to the pc(lan) or to a router.
    I know of at least 20 that do just that and they all assign private IP
    addresses.
    LINKSYS
    NETGEAR
    and a bunch more do and they are not modem routers just modems.
    They have a built in DHCP server that sometimes can be turned off and even
    then they assign one IP address and that is a private one.
    IF you were to even look at any specs of the Linksys ADSL2MUE then you would
    see that is so.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #5
  6. Nero

    Nero Guest

    You said" ISP's normally have a bank of addresses assigned to them for
    their exclusive
    use, which they then assign to their customers on a dynamic basis. If you
    change to another ISP I'll bet they are on another subnet than the last ISP
    you had so I find it hard to believe your IP address has never changed
    unless you have your IP registered with the necessary Internet authority."

    I said that ALL the ISP's I have ever been with have ALWAYS given out a
    static IP.
    I never said the IP address has never changed.
    I never said anything about DIAL UP.
    Why would I be using an ethernet modem(ADSL) if I was on dialup???
    I said all the ISP's I have been with and most ISP's that I have checked out
    ALL give out static IP addresses!.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #6
  7. ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Nero" <>
    Newsgroups: alt.comp.networking.routers
    Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2005 2:16 PM
    Subject: Re: Linksys router and modem, no one can connect to me

    This is the first I've heard of it. My Motorola cable modem doesn't so it's
    not a universal feature.
    I took a look on the Linksys web site and I didn't see anything listed
    identified as a ADSL2MUE modem.

    http://www.linksys.com/products/group.asp?grid=34&scid=29

    I finally did find it on their international site, didn't know they had
    products exclusively for international sales, however the manual is not
    available on line. I tried the link but it doesn't work.

    http://www.linksys.com/international/product.asp?coid=19&ipid=604

    The information that is there doesn't mention anything about a DHCP server
    function. I had to do a Google search and found it mentioned on some forum
    on the 'net.

    Anyway did you find anything useful at the link I posted for setting up Net
    Meeting behind a NAT router? It looks like there are some serious issues
    getting it to work without special support features built in to the router.

    --------------
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    Wireless Network
    Mobile computing
    on the go brought
    to you by Micro$oft
     
    Leland C. Scott, Jan 15, 2005
    #7
  8. OK, I miss read your post. That's what I get for typing out a reply too
    fast. For some reason I thought you implied the address was the same from
    one ISP to another that you had.
    They don't charge extra for a static IP? If the ADSL modem gets it's IP
    using DHCP then by definition it is a dynamic IP address since there is a
    "lease time" after which the address lease has to be renewed. You didn't
    mention how the modem gets it's IP address from the ISP, DHCP client, or
    manually entered using an address obtained from your ISP and assigned to
    you. Since I can't down load a copy of the manual for your modem I can't
    tell which of those options your modem provides, or both.

    --
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    Wireless Network
    Mobile computing
    on the go brought
    to you by Micro$oft
     
    Leland C. Scott, Jan 15, 2005
    #8
  9. Nero

    Nero Guest

    "They don't charge extra for a static IP? If the ADSL modem gets it's IP
    using DHCP then by definition it is a dynamic IP address since there is a
    "lease time" after which the address lease has to be renewed. "
    Nope, I only deal with ISP's who do not charge extra.

    The modem can be set to dhcp or static mode for the isp.
    As to lease time the modem default is 1 hour up to 72 hours.
    It says if your ISP issues a static IP address for your account then use
    default setting of obtain IP address by DCHP.
    Even after the leas time is up the IP number stays the same.
    If it is set to static ip then it stays the same IP address always.
    It is the same IP address I have had for hours.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #9
  10. Nero

    Nero Guest

    Yes, know all about netmeeting behind NATs and stuff.
    I can forward the required ports to MY only pc but it aint gonna work as my
    IP address (internet connection, lan )is still a private one.
    1. the modem only assigns private IP addresses and even if the built in dhcp
    server is off it still assigns a single private IP address to the pc or
    router.
    2. the router also assigns a private IP address to the pc and even if the
    dhcp server is off the it too assigns a single private IP address to to pc.
    So you have a modem that gets the ips IP address, changes it into a private
    on, passes it on to the pc or router that in turn changes that to a private
    IP address to give to the pc(lan/nic).
    So how the heck could port forwarding to the pc(private IP address of say
    192.168.0.101)ever allow anyone to connect to me?
    Not a chance.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #10
  11. Nero

    Nero Guest

    "I took a look on the Linksys web site and I didn't see anything listed
    identified as a ADSL2MUE modem."
    You will not unless you look at the UK site as it is only on that site.
    Do a google and it will show up.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #11
  12. Nero

    Nero Guest

    One other thing regarding"lease"time, regardless of any of my adsl modems
    the release time could even be minutes but the IP address does not change at
    all.
     
    Nero, Jan 15, 2005
    #12
  13. Nero

    Travis Guest

    A search of the Linksys site for ADSL2MUE returns zero results.
     
    Travis, Jan 15, 2005
    #13
  14. Nero

    Travis Guest

    WRONG. Most ISP's assign dynamic IP addresses unless you pay extra for
    a static address.
     
    Travis, Jan 15, 2005
    #14
  15. Nero

    Nero Guest

    It is on Linksys international site for UK.
    It is not on sale in America
    Do a web search like I did and it will turn up.
     
    Nero, Jan 16, 2005
    #15
  16. Nero

    Nero Guest

    You are wrong mush!!
    I don't care what yankee ISP's do and anyway, I never said WHAT countries.
    AND IF you bothered to look outside the states and see how the rest of the
    world does things for once.

    "WRONG. Most ISP's assign dynamic IP addresses unless you pay extra for
    a static address."

    ALL the ISP's I know of ALL do not charge extra so fook off
     
    Nero, Jan 16, 2005
    #16
  17. Nero

    Travis Guest

    How much do you pay per month for your static IP address?
     
    Travis, Jan 16, 2005
    #17
  18. From my understanding when the lease runs out the ISP can just renew the
    lease without changing the IP address. That can give one the impression that
    the IP is static when it really isn't and some people get fooled. I think
    that is all explained at the site I posted a link to that talks about DHCP.

    --
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    Wireless Network
    Mobile computing
    on the go brought
    to you by Micro$oft
     
    Leland C. Scott, Jan 16, 2005
    #18
  19. Maybe yes. Stop and think about this logically. Your other Internet
    applications work, like surfing the Internet, E-mail etc. Each one of those
    applications has to know WHERE to send the results, to your PC using that
    "private" address between the modem and the router etc.. What happens there
    is the application includes your "outside" IP address in the IP header on
    all out going packets. The application at the other end thus knows where to
    send the reply back to, your outside IP address.

    The problems start when others try to connect to you where they need to know
    your "outside" IP address, the one from your ISP. The SPI firewall in the
    router causes problems. SPI matches incoming IP packets to make sure they
    are the replies to out going IP packets. Since there won't be any out going
    IP packets when somebody is trying to connect to you the IP traffic is
    blocked. Port Forwarding effectively turns off this out going and in coming
    IP packet matching allowing any in coming IP packets addressed to the
    particular port forwarded to pass through.

    What isn't clear is which address are the people using to try to connect to
    your LAN? The "outside" address, the one supplied by your ISP, or the
    "inside" (private) address used internally by your LAN connected computers.

    For DMZ to work the address used for that has to be a distinct address on
    your LAN, one that will NEVER be assigned by the router's DHCP server. That
    also means that the computer on the DMZ must be configured to use a static
    "inside" IP address and set to the same address specified for the DMZ.

    I've been all through this sort of exorcise already setting up my two FTP
    servers on my home LAN.

    --
    Leland C. Scott
    KC8LDO

    Wireless Network
    Mobile computing
    on the go brought
    to you by Micro$oft
     
    Leland C. Scott, Jan 16, 2005
    #19
  20. Nero

    Nero Guest

    I pay £24 a month and it comes with a static IP address as standard.
    I used to pay my other ISP £19 a month and all they had were static IP
    addresses.
    Virgin
    PlusNet
    Zen
    V21
    and a load more all charge from around £17 -25 a month for a 512k(home
    500)account(all static ip addresses as standard)
    to around £21-33 a month for a 1Mb account(still static IP)
     
    Nero, Jan 16, 2005
    #20
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