Letterbox vs. full screen?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Philip Marlow, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. I have a movie on DVD that is in letterbox format. I can copy without any
    problem. Is there a way to convert that in full screen format?
    Thanks.
     
    Philip Marlow, Feb 24, 2004
    #1
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  2. Philip Marlow

    Pug Fugley Guest

    Why yes. Which reminds me..I have a brand new Ferarri...is there any way to
    make it handle like a '74 Pinto??
     
    Pug Fugley, Feb 24, 2004
    #2
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  3. Philip Marlow

    Richard C. Guest

    : I have a movie on DVD that is in letterbox format. I can copy without
    any
    : problem. Is there a way to convert that in full screen format?
    : Thanks.
    :
    ===========
    Sure..........trim about 3/4" off of the original DVD before copying.
     
    Richard C., Feb 24, 2004
    #3
  4. LOL, classic.

    --
    "Get rid of the Range Rover. You are not responsible for patrolling
    Australia's Dingo Barrier Fence, nor do you work the Savannah, capturing
    and tagging wildebeests."
    --Michael J. Nelson

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Feb 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Please go away and never come back.

    --
    "Get rid of the Range Rover. You are not responsible for patrolling
    Australia's Dingo Barrier Fence, nor do you work the Savannah, capturing
    and tagging wildebeests."
    --Michael J. Nelson

    Grand Inquisitor
    http://www.dvdprofiler.com/mycollection.asp?alias=Oost
     
    Grand Inquisitor, Feb 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Philip Marlow

    Justin Guest

    Philip Marlow wrote on [Tue, 24 Feb 2004 13:56:09 -0500]:
    w00t!

    Combining two hated things into one post!

    Pirate fullscreen moron
     
    Justin, Feb 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Many DVDs are available in fullscreen, but there is no way to convert a
    widescreen-only movie to fullscreen. Some players offer a zoom, and some
    PC programs do as well. This is a rather crude method, but then, genuine
    fullscreen transfers aren't much better.

    You may want to read here for a better understanding of
    widescreen DVDs:

    http:/www.widescreen.org



    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.Daily-Reviews.com
     
    Aaron J. Bossig, Feb 25, 2004
    #7
  8. Philip Marlow

    DarkMatter Guest

    It has to be a test troll, doesn't it?
     
    DarkMatter, Feb 25, 2004
    #8
  9. Philip Marlow

    Bur Guest

    Not really. The letterbox format could theoretically be zoomed (in
    software?) but tou will have lost detail. It's important to note the
    type of DVD before purchasing it. A 'full-screen' DVD will fill the
    screen and, if the original movie was widescreen, the movie will be
    panned from side to side to ensure all relevant picture data is always
    in the screen. So a simple zoom might also leave you looking at a
    picture with relevant information chopped off one side or the other.
    Some movies are available only in widescreen which leaves you with the
    option of putting up with ugly black bars or just skipping the movie.
    I generally rent widescreen only releases and buy only fullscreen for
    my permanent collection.
     
    Bur, Feb 28, 2004
    #9
  10. Philip Marlow

    Richard C. Guest

    : I generally rent widescreen only releases and buy only fullscreen for
    : my permanent collection.

    =============
    sounds kind of foolish to me.......................
    =============
     
    Richard C., Feb 29, 2004
    #10
  11. Philip Marlow

    Justin Guest

    Bur wrote on [28 Feb 2004 14:36:00 -0800]:
    So, you explain why widescreen is better than fullscreen yet you only
    buy fullscreen?
     
    Justin, Feb 29, 2004
    #11
  12. Philip Marlow

    GMAN Guest

    "what a strange little man"

    Buzz Lightyear
     
    GMAN, Feb 29, 2004
    #12
  13. Philip Marlow

    Mark W Guest


    He didn't say he thought it was better.
     
    Mark W, Feb 29, 2004
    #13
  14. Philip Marlow

    Justin Guest

    Mark W wrote on [Sun, 29 Feb 2004 12:42:24 -0000]:
    No, he didn't. He did explain why it was better though
     
    Justin, Feb 29, 2004
    #14
  15. Philip Marlow

    Black Locust Guest

    All of the picture is relevant. If you're not supposed to see it, it
    isn't shot. Do you honestly believe they spend millions of dollars
    shooting movies in a 2.35:1 aspect ratios just so half of that movies
    picture can simply be tossed away for your pan & scam DVD's?
    Haha. I think you've got that backwards. You're going to feel like a
    complete and utter idiot when you're forced to a buy an HDTV.
     
    Black Locust, Mar 1, 2004
    #15
  16. Philip Marlow

    Bur Guest

    If you look at the first post in this thread you will see that the
    question is whether a widescreen DVD can be copied as a fullscreen
    copy. The question did not deal with whether P&S or WS is 'better' or
    whatever. The poster has already answered that question and decided
    he wants FS. Given that I said that the quality of such a transfer
    wouldn't be good. Aaron Bossig said much the same thing. BTW, the
    movie director is already aware that the movie will be displayed in FS
    mode (at the very least on VHS) and if relevant picture elements are
    not present in the P&S transfer it means he has failed to properly
    compose his shots. I think monumental incompetance of directors is
    the exception rather than the rule and movies just about always look
    better in FS on a TV set.
     
    Bur, Mar 1, 2004
    #16
  17. Philip Marlow

    Justin Guest

    Bur wrote on [1 Mar 2004 10:19:40 -0800]:
    Then boy do you think wrong.
     
    Justin, Mar 1, 2004
    #17
  18. (Bur) wrote in
    Said director is also aware that the movie will eventually be translated
    into Spanish, French, and probably other languages for worldwide
    distribution. Does that affect how the English script should be written?
    Following the above analogy, is it "incompetance" for a script written
    in English to sound goofy in Spanish? No. It's not the fault of the
    filmmaker if the movie doesn't work as well after it's been putzed with.


    --

    Aaron J. Bossig

    http://www.GodsLabRat.com
    http://www.Daily-Reviews.com
     
    Aaron J. Bossig, Mar 1, 2004
    #18
  19. Philip Marlow

    Card53 Guest

    I think monumental incompetance of directors is
    They won't on the TV set you'll own within a few years.

    Plus, while your statement might have very slight merit when applied to films
    made in the last 20 years or so, it certainly doesn't apply to WS releases made
    before that. I don't think David Lean composed LAWRENCE OF ARABIA so it would
    also "look good on TV," for instance.

    I also fail to see how a director's taking advantage of the full 70mm palette
    could be regarded as "monumental incompetence." If he composes everything to
    "look better in FS on a TV set," then to me he's not competent enough to be
    working in films and should seek work in television. (A medium that's
    gradually shifting to WS, in case you hadn't noticed.)



    John Larrabee
    Co-founder: Laurel & Hardy Central
    http://laurelandhardycentral.com

    (To respond via e-mail, remove "nixspam")
     
    Card53, Mar 1, 2004
    #19
  20. Philip Marlow

    Bur Guest

    Some movies should be seen in a theatre. Lawrence of Arabia is one of
    them. You are also correct in pointing out that early WS movies were
    not filmed with TV in mind. In fact, since WS was introduced as a
    marketing gimmick to differentiate movies from TV, it may be that some
    of those movies were framed such that a P&S will always be lacking in
    places. So what? The majority of the movies we are interested in
    have been filmed in the last 25 years, after it became apparent that
    the video life of the movie far exceeds the theatre life.
    "Looking better in FS on a TV set" does not mean it looks better than
    WS in a movie theatre. It means it looks better than a half blank
    screen with a stripe across the middle on a home TV set. It also
    means the director was aware, while framing his shots, of how the P&S
    transfer would eventually look and, when needed, changed the framing
    to make sure the P&S contains relevant picture elements. That's what a
    professional director should do.
     
    Bur, Mar 2, 2004
    #20
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