Kit for Backpacking

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by John Ortt, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    Hi Everyone,

    For months now I have been asking questions about what camera and equipment
    I should take on my long-haul backpacking trip this year.

    I eventually (and reluctantly) decided to leave my 300D at home and take an
    S3 IS with me instead.
    I would need a 300mm+ lens on the 300D to equal the range of the S3 and
    this would cost me hundreds and take up most of my weight allowance.

    The wife has kindly bought me the S3 for christmas and now I need to decide
    on what accessories I will need to get the most out of it.

    My immediate thoughts are:

    Lens Cleaning Cloth
    Mini Tripod (Fixed, not bendy legs)
    Bean Bag (empty)
    Battery Charger (Universal Voltage with Car adapter)
    4 spare rechargable AA batteries

    I would also like to fit a UV filter and lens hood but would like some
    advice on reputable brands to go for (I am wary of E-bay).

    A couple of final questions:

    Should I take a full size monopod or rely on the mini tripod/ beanbag
    combination
    Are the tele/wide-angle converters worth considdering to give greater
    flexibility?

    Is there any way to remote trigger the camera other than using the timer?

    Thanks in advance,

    John
     
    John Ortt, Jan 2, 2007
    #1
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  2. John Ortt

    bluezfolk Guest

    Although I haven't seen one in recent times, one of those
    thingys that has a tripod head and a "C" clamp base for mounting the
    camera on poles or tree limbs etc. might be useful on a backpack hike,
    for use with the self timer to do self portraits.


    Eric
     
    bluezfolk, Jan 2, 2007
    #2
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  3. John Ortt

    Tim Guest

    Hi John

    I've no great advice I'm afraid but I did just trip over this on Amazon and
    remembered your post so I thought you might be interested in this
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Backpackers...ref=cm_lm_fullview_prod_6/202-7465098-2518236

    Just had a thought, a lens pen might be good to have as well they seem to
    work well, and aren't too heavy :)
    Also tape and whatever screwdrivers your camera needs might save some
    grief - if you're a pessimist like me!

    Re the mono pod question, do you hike with a stick anyway? if so I would
    have thought a monopod/walking pole combo would make sense
    Hope you have a great trip
    Tim
     
    Tim, Jan 2, 2007
    #3
  4. An excellent choice!

    I have travelled extensively with the S2 IS, and here's what I have:
    - Lensmate adapter with UV filter.
    http://www.lensmateonline.com/newsite/S2.html . Makes the camera
    somewhat more bulky, but protects the extending lens, the most
    vulnerable part of the camera.
    - A good firm camera bag that will accommodate the camera with lensmate
    adapter. Buy the adapter first, and take the camera along when shopping
    for bags. Select a bag which allows you to extract and replace your
    camera with one hand... (Get used to slipping the camera's wrist strap
    over your hand before extracting from camera bag! i.e. fit the strap to
    the R.H side of the camera! )
    - My ultrapod 1. http://www.pedcopods.com/products.htm. Its light
    enough to fix to the strap of my camera bag, and attaches via its
    velcro strap to any branch, chair, gatepost available. (The ultrapod 2
    is significantly bigger, but overkill for the S2.). You can strap it to
    the top of any available stick, and *bingo* - monopod.
    - In the Miscellaneous section of my bag: Microfibre lens cloth, spare
    memory card, spare batteries, a pair of those cheap throw-away reading
    spectacles, mini USB cable, rubber extendable lens hood.

    I have the Maha multi-voltage charger, with a set of international plug
    adapters.

    Good luck and have fun!

    /M
     
    Moro Grubb of Little Delving, Jan 2, 2007
    #4
  5. John Ortt

    tomm42 Guest

    I'd prefer my DSLR, but I mosttly canoe camp, gota save weight when
    hiking. The only real down side of the S3 is if you have subdued light
    and have to up the ISO.
    I would use a monopod as a hiking pole. I have a nice Gitzo 6 extension
    that has a great grip.
    Not sure about the Canon S3 on how wide it goes. If its wides is 28mm
    I'd forgoe the auxillary lens, if its widest is 35 or worse 38 I'd get
    the WA lens. I really liked them with my old 995 Nikon, even the
    fisheye adaptor. Get the Canon WA add on, most of the after market add
    ons are crappy.
    Don't worry about a UV filter, but look into a polarizer, takes away
    glare and takes the edge off noon sun. B&W, Hoya, Canon would be fine
    for filter brands.
    For batteries have 2 sets of 2500-2700 NiHMs and a set of AA Lithium.
    Enjoy the hike.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jan 2, 2007
    #5
  6. John Ortt

    ray Guest

    I would suggest a couple of sets of lithium ion AA batteries to pack with
    you. What good does a battery charger do on a backpacking trip?
    I have previously used them on a Kodak DC210+ and they gave acceptable
    results. It's hard to tell until you've used it.
     
    ray, Jan 2, 2007
    #6
  7. John Ortt

    Robert Haar Guest


    How long a trip? Where, what time of year?
    Have you considered one of the water resistant point-and-shot cameras? If
    not, you might want to take a water

    Why, almost anything will work, an empty baggie, a clothing bag, etc.
    Will you have you car with you? I thought this was backpacking? I know
    people who take solar battery chargers on long trips.
    How about a hiking stick with a threaded camera mount on top?
     
    Robert Haar, Jan 3, 2007
    #7
  8. John Ortt

    timeOday Guest


    I'd also suggest testing the camera's battery life beforehand with
    whatever kind of batteries you'll be taking, so you know how
    conservative you need to be in shooting (or how many batteries to take).
     
    timeOday, Jan 3, 2007
    #8
  9. John Ortt

    Alan Meyer Guest

    For backpacking I'd leave the monopod home.
    Don't know, but if there is, it will be in the manual that came with
    the camera.

    Also maybe to take:

    Extra memory card(s) (unless you have a laptop in a car that you'll
    visit from time to time.)
    Camera bag - I like one as small as possible that fits the camera and
    batteries, etc. Good padding is nice to for that time when you
    bang
    the bag against a rock by accident.

    I ALWAYS wear the camera bag on a strap across the opposite
    shoulder - never on a belt loop (I've had loops tear off), and never
    on the same shoulder as the bag. That's asking for trouble.

    Alan
     
    Alan Meyer, Jan 3, 2007
    #9
  10. ...snip..

    One resource I've found useful for my S2, (and presumably most tips
    would apply to your S3):
    http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=10364

    In a nutshell:
    - Use "P" mode, and set exposure compensation to -2/3.
    - Don't rely on AWB. Use one of the WB pre-sets (sunny/cloudy/etc) or
    use custom white balance.
    - Avoid ISO 400. Even if you have noise ninja.

    HTH

    /M
     
    Moro Grubb of Little Delving, Jan 3, 2007
    #10
  11. John Ortt

    John Ortt Guest

    Thanks for all the replies guys

    Lots of useful info.

    I'll try to reply to all of the necessary posts during my lunch break today.

    All the best,

    John
     
    John Ortt, Jan 4, 2007
    #11
  12. Maybe more batteries--depends on how long they last with your camera.

    I'd get a walking staff that has a camera mount on it instead of the
    tripod. Think multipurpose.

    I have a cheap collapsible monopod. It's OK for what it's designed for,
    but its length adjusters aren't sturdy enough to allow double duty as a
    staff.

    I've looked at those, haven't bit yet. Maybe an adapter so you can put a
    polarizer on your camera. I think most compact cameras already have UV
    filters built in.

    Depends on your camera. My Canon can't do that--self timer only.
    Someone suggested a padded case. Lowepro makes some good ones with thin
    padding, a neck cord and belt loop, and pockets for batteries and memory
    cards--got mine at Best Buy. For overkill, consider Pelican (from REI),
    but carry it in your pack.
     
    Pat O'Connell, Jan 4, 2007
    #12
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