keeping cool

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Nova, Apr 28, 2005.

  1. Nova

    Nova Guest

    I am just thinking about buying a laptop.. probably an asus or acer as
    they seem to be well priced and have lots of bells and whistles..

    I am curious though.. they have the pentium-m series, and they have the
    the normal p4-3.06 in a laptop.. how do they keep these cool enough in a
    laptop? i mean p4's are damn hot... and in a normal pc i have a huge
    copper heatsink, big fan on it, case fans and a ton of air in the case..
    im just curious as to how laptops actually keep cool considering the
    lack of space and the how close all the compenents are, especially these
    laptops that use normal processors like the p4's etc

    thx
     
    Nova, Apr 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Nova

    simondo Guest

    That's easy down here in Dunedin -- we use nature's cpu cooler (aka an open
    window).

    My lappy has a pentium-m in it and that doesn't produce a great deal of
    heat. They're designed to not get that hot, plus the dynamic speed
    throttling on them adjusts the speed of the cpu to the task load. This
    reduces the heat *a lot*, to the point where I only notice it in extended
    computatively intensive tasks. And only then because the fan goes on. The
    thing which makes the most noticeable contribution to the heat of my laptop
    is the 7200 rpm hard drive. I'd never had wrist sweat before getting this
    laptop.

    Buggered if I know how they do it with the pentium 4s though. I know there's
    a variant called, confusingly, the pentium4-m which has dynamic speed
    throttling and other powersaving/heat reducing features. It's not supposed
    to be as effective at either of these things as the pentium-m though.
    Otherwise, I guess you just have to avoid using it literally as a lap-top.

    cheers,
    simondo
     
    simondo, Apr 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. I think notebooks using desktop processors are called "desknotes".
    They're cheaper and more powerful than proper laptops, but they have
    horrendous battery life (as you can imagine). They're really designed to
    be portable (as in, usable anywhere there's a desk and a mains point),
    as opposed to being placed on your lap.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Apr 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Nova

    Nik Coughin Guest

    I have a full powered p4-3ghz in a laptop. Case gets hot enough that you
    don't want to touch it. When there is too much load on the gfx card
    (geforce 5650) and the processor their combined heat makes the thing turn
    itself off. Lovely. Only tends to happen while playing games.
     
    Nik Coughin, May 3, 2005
    #4
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