Keep the MCSE Cert Petition

Discussion in 'MCITP' started by Jonathan Hughes, Jun 5, 2007.

  1. Jonathan Hughes, Jun 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. I totally disagree with this.

    1) the term engineer is a highly contentious issue in many jurisdictions.
    For instance in Quebec and it is now illegal for someone to use the
    designation MCSE if they are not an engineer.

    2) It is way to broad a certification. To many times someone who has an MCSE
    uses it as a blanket certification to claim expertise in on a specific
    product. Even if you have the + Security or + Messaging this is a very minor
    specialization, and it doesn't go far enough.

    The new way to do certification is correct. A certification aligns with a
    product. You can be certified on Exchange, Windows Server, Desktop,
    Management, Visual Studio. It means people can concentrate on learning the
    in the technology area that applies to their job, and it means employers can
    adequately gage whether a candidate has the knowledge on the product they
    need.

    This is a good thing. PLEASE do not sign this survey. It is not the message
    Microsoft needs to hear.

    And before I get flamed I am an MCSE on 2003 and I fully believe it should
    go away.

    Daniel N
    MCT/MCSE/MCSA/MCTS
     
    Daniel Nerenberg, Jun 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard], Jun 6, 2007
    #3
  4. That makes a lot of sense...

     
    Michael Gossett, Jun 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Seems clear to me. The certification is not retiring. If you have it you
    have it. If you want it, take and pass the exams. With that said, the
    Windows Server 2000 exams are scheduled for retirement in the first part
    of 2008. The Windows 2003 exams are still available with no retirement
    dates mentioned or published.
     
    Michael D. Alligood [CertGuard], Jun 6, 2007
    #5
  6. Actually I think he's referring to something else, as I also heard that the
    MCSE 2003 was retiring next year, but "retiring" in the sense that it will
    not be updated anymore and that it is now in its final state.
     
    Michael Gossett, Jun 6, 2007
    #6
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