Just curious about expiring Divx rentals

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by M.L., Mar 25, 2006.

  1. M.L.

    M.L. Guest

    While doing a Google search on a completely different subject I came
    across a website that rented expiring Divx titles. Excerpts from their
    FAQ:

    "How many times can I watch my rented DivX movie?
    You can watch your DivX movie as many times as you want during your
    selected rental period.

    When does the rental period begin?
    Your rental period begins when you start the movie download. This
    makes it easy for you to purchase multiple titles and to start the
    download and viewing at your leisure.

    What happens when my rental period expires?
    Once your rental period expires, the downloaded file becomes inactive.
    If you want to remove it from your hard drive, simply delete the
    file."

    I have never heard of this technology. But I gotta ask out of
    curiosity, can such restrictions be defeated?
     
    M.L., Mar 25, 2006
    #1
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  2. M.L.

    someone Guest

    probably writes date\time to Registry.
     
    someone, Mar 25, 2006
    #2
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  3. M.L.

    Trax Guest

    |>
    |>While doing a Google search on a completely different subject I came
    |>across a website that rented expiring Divx titles. Excerpts from their
    |>FAQ:
    |>
    |>"How many times can I watch my rented DivX movie?
    |>You can watch your DivX movie as many times as you want during your
    |>selected rental period.
    |>
    |>When does the rental period begin?
    |>Your rental period begins when you start the movie download. This
    |>makes it easy for you to purchase multiple titles and to start the
    |>download and viewing at your leisure.
    |>
    |>What happens when my rental period expires?
    |>Once your rental period expires, the downloaded file becomes inactive.
    |>If you want to remove it from your hard drive, simply delete the
    |>file."
    |>
    |>I have never heard of this technology. But I gotta ask out of
    |>curiosity, can such restrictions be defeated?

    Of course it can be defeated just a matter of what protection they
    use; you should of link'd this post to alt.binaries.cracks as well
    (standard virus warnings blah blah blah....)
     
    Trax, Mar 25, 2006
    #3
  4. M.L.

    Kringe Guest


    Personally - I think that web site is just selling illegal copies of movies.
    They claim a 'rental period' exists so it will sound illegal.

    In essence you are just buying pirated movies.


    Just my opinion though...
     
    Kringe, Mar 26, 2006
    #4
  5. M.L.

    Kringe Guest

     
    Kringe, Mar 26, 2006
    #5
  6. Interesting ... Do you guys remember that initially DIVX was a physical disk
    that was sold (by CompUSA if I'm not mistaken) and had to be played on a
    special DIVX player. They were cheaper than 'regualr' DVDs and had the same
    'feature' .. that you could watch them as much as you liked, but only for a
    certain time period (I forget how long, but it started when you first
    watched the movie) after that, they were coasters.
     
    Richard Amirault, Mar 26, 2006
    #6
  7. M.L.

    Joe B Guest


    Circus City
     
    Joe B, Mar 26, 2006
    #7
  8. M.L.

    J. Clarke Guest

    The fine print is that you have to use a special player, which presumably
    enforces the time limit. And that player is only available for Windows.

    I don't see how writing a time limit into the registry would work anyway,
    anybody with administrator privilege can change registry entries.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 27, 2006
    #8
  9. M.L.

    Margolotta Guest

    Ah another idiot who worships at the feet of the idol Gates. Windoze isn't
    the only OS in existence and, if what you say is true (which it isn't) people
    running UNIX-based OSs (such as Linux and the Mac OS) could view the download
    indefinitely as UNIX OSs aren't registry-based.

    The limitation will be coded into the file somehow.
     
    Margolotta, Mar 27, 2006
    #9
  10. M.L.

    Barry OGrady Guest

    The DIVX players were connected to a phone line and the player would dial
    up the company and upload usage information for billing purposes. When the
    company providing the service went out of business the players and the disks
    were unusable.
    There is a similar thing now with Windows Media Player. WMP contacts the
    company providing the service via the internet for permission to play the movie.

    Barry
    =====
    Home page
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~barry.og
     
    Barry OGrady, Mar 27, 2006
    #10
  11. That's true only if you can find the registry entry...

    Nothing stops the provider from putting an encrypted entry into the
    registry, or an entry named and written in a way that does not reveal
    its source or its semantics.

    Even so, a user can still run a registry monitor that detects
    changes...

    Gino
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Mar 27, 2006
    #11
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