Is Windows Xp a good place to start

Discussion in 'MCDST' started by Tony, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    I'm in the very beginning stages of obtaining certification(s) and wanted to
    know if I'd be wasting my time with going for Windows XP (Microsoft Certified
    Desktop Support Technician (MCDST)). or should I be jumping to Windows 7?

    The wide rage of certification available is quite new to me as well so I
    would appreciate any direction that anyone could give. I feel my skills are
    in the following areas;

    - Very familiar with Windows XP and all prior OS's, including
    troubleshooting, installations, and overall operation.
    - Somewhat familiar with Windows Vista and Windows 7, including
    troubleshooting, installation, and overall operation.
    - Very familiar with building computers from scratch and replacing bad or
    outdated components.
    - Very familiar with overall Windows, hardware / software compatibilities.
    - Very familiar with setting up home and small offices with networks and
    computers. (non-server)
    I'm looking to obtain certification(s) that will allow me to apply the
    skills above an ones obtained in this process, to a career in the I.T. field.

    Again, with all that's available through Microsoft certifications and
    otherwise, I would greatly appreciate any suggestions or comments that will
    help me to get started in the right place.

    Tony
     
    Tony, Jan 12, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Tony

    Michael Cox Guest

    Given the point of certification is to prove your worth to someone else, presumably to be paid in exchange for work. Truth is that higher wages go to rarer skills, so the is some motivation to be an early adopter of Windows 7. OTOH, the very people that you would like have hire you are usually not early adopters of technology, which makes the case for XP, and really NT even.

    The answer to your question really depends on what sort of work might be available in the area you live in.

    Reality is that large companies want specialists and small companies want generalists. It is also reality that anyone can swap hardware in and out, so what skills make you special? Even with certification that question will nag at you in interviews.

    Can you script?

    Know any CSS, or XML?

    Do you know how to link excel spreadsheets together?

    Can you configure a Cisco router?

    What is the proper procedure to follow when the VP of Finance gives you her laptop and all your co-workers wages are in an Excel file that opens when the computer boots?

    Can you configure pcs to download a new user registry each morning when they boot?

    Regardless of how you answered, you are at a first step and the road is long. Make yourself valuable to the company you work for and the company across town.

    Get your certification in Windows XP, then start on Windows 7. And make certain you plan on getting a degree in something, it does not matter what the degree is in. Do not fail at this step, it is far more important than certification.

    BTW: The questions I asked you were tasks I was given as a PC Tech. Just instead of the router, it was a serial port switch. The speadsheet told me to look for another job. :)

    Oh, and keep this in mind. Somewhere, someone still has a Novell network running two Windows 3.11 boxes that are the most important machines in the lab, it must never go down, not never; if that network fails, you are fired.

    Good luck and enjoy it.



    Tony wrote:

    Is Windows Xp a good place to start
    11-Jan-10

    I am in the very beginning stages of obtaining certification(s) and wanted t
    know if I'd be wasting my time with going for Windows XP (Microsoft Certifie
    Desktop Support Technician (MCDST)). or should I be jumping to Windows 7

    The wide rage of certification available is quite new to me as well so
    would appreciate any direction that anyone could give. I feel my skills ar
    in the following areas

    - Very familiar with Windows XP and all prior OS's, includin
    troubleshooting, installations, and overall operation
    - Somewhat familiar with Windows Vista and Windows 7, includin
    troubleshooting, installation, and overall operation
    - Very familiar with building computers from scratch and replacing bad o
    outdated components
    - Very familiar with overall Windows, hardware / software compatibilities
    - Very familiar with setting up home and small offices with networks an
    computers. (non-server
    I am looking to obtain certification(s) that will allow me to apply th
    skills above an ones obtained in this process, to a career in the I.T. field

    Again, with all that is available through Microsoft certifications an
    otherwise, I would greatly appreciate any suggestions or comments that wil
    help me to get started in the right place

    Tony

    Previous Posts In This Thread:

    Is Windows Xp a good place to start
    I am in the very beginning stages of obtaining certification(s) and wanted t
    know if I'd be wasting my time with going for Windows XP (Microsoft Certifie
    Desktop Support Technician (MCDST)). or should I be jumping to Windows 7

    The wide rage of certification available is quite new to me as well so
    would appreciate any direction that anyone could give. I feel my skills ar
    in the following areas

    - Very familiar with Windows XP and all prior OS's, includin
    troubleshooting, installations, and overall operation
    - Somewhat familiar with Windows Vista and Windows 7, includin
    troubleshooting, installation, and overall operation
    - Very familiar with building computers from scratch and replacing bad o
    outdated components.
    - Very familiar with overall Windows, hardware / software compatibilities.
    - Very familiar with setting up home and small offices with networks and
    computers. (non-server)
    I am looking to obtain certification(s) that will allow me to apply the
    skills above an ones obtained in this process, to a career in the I.T. field.

    Again, with all that is available through Microsoft certifications and
    otherwise, I would greatly appreciate any suggestions or comments that will
    help me to get started in the right place.

    Tony


    Submitted via EggHeadCafe - Software Developer Portal of Choice
    Design Pattern Interview Questions Part 3
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com/tutorial...84-70948cdfa6b2/design-pattern-interview.aspx
     
    Michael Cox, Jan 26, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.