Inkjet Inks - longevity?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Watcher of the Skies, Dec 28, 2003.

  1. A two part question for the same topic.

    1) My father wants to use an inkjet printer to print out valuable documents
    for archiving. Does anyone have any idea how long the ink will last on the
    paper before it starts to deteriorate. Obviously things like storage
    conditions and the Ph of the paper will play a part, but generally, will it
    last a generation or two?

    2) When printing onto photo paper, how do they fare when it comes to fading
    in day light compared to proper photos under the same conditions?

    Thanx
     
    Watcher of the Skies, Dec 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. Watcher of the Skies

    Bishoop Guest

    | A two part question for the same topic.
    |
    | 1) My father wants to use an inkjet printer to print out valuable
    documents
    | for archiving. Does anyone have any idea how long the ink will last on the
    | paper before it starts to deteriorate. Obviously things like storage
    | conditions and the Ph of the paper will play a part, but generally, will
    it
    | last a generation or two?
    |
    | 2) When printing onto photo paper, how do they fare when it comes to
    fading
    | in day light compared to proper photos under the same conditions?
    |
    | Thanx
    |
    |
    | ---------------------------------------------------
    | Just because you are parranoid,
    | it doesn't mean that no-one is
    | out to get you ! !
    | ---------------------------------------------------

    Here's a starter for you:

    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/forum.asp?forum=1003&page=1

    Lots of discussions and links to information on inkjet longevity.
     
    Bishoop, Dec 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. If it's non photographic, I'd suggest laser printing on to good quality
    heavy stock, rather than inkjet printing for long-term storage, greater than
    a generation or so.
    If it's photographic material investigate getting it professionally printed
    via a bureau, using a process like 'digital Cibachrome', colour laser, or
    dye-sublimation.

    Go here for some info about long-term inkjet print storage.
    http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/researchDevelopment/productFeatures/lightfast.shtml
     
    michael turner, Dec 28, 2003
    #3
  4. Watcher of the Skies

    Budweiser Guest

    if you are going to archive the documents--why print??
    burn to cd/dvd---make multiple copies on different brands if you are that
    worried
     
    Budweiser, Dec 28, 2003
    #4
  5. Watcher of the Skies

    Sultan Guest

    Watcher of the Skies wrote in
    As long as he is using manufacturers ink, ie Epson, HP, Canon etc they
    will last for decades. Refill kit inks tend to fade after only a few
    years. Avoid sunlight and humidity.

    Sultan
     
    Sultan, Dec 28, 2003
    #5
  6. CD and DVD will be gone within 20 years - cf. 78rpm, LPs, 8" floppies,
    8-track. Only paper will survive.
     
    Geoff Pearson, Dec 28, 2003
    #6
  7. Watcher of the Skies

    Senti Guest

    Watcher of the Skies did mumble with his mouth full...
    Technical Brief on Epsons Durabrite inks:
    http://files.support.epson.com/pdf/sc80__/sc80__db.pdf

    Durabrite promo webpage:
    http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/DuraBrite/DuraBriteMain.jsp?BV_UseBVCookie=yes

    I can back up there claims on smudge-resistance and water-"proofedness" :)
    I haven't had it long enough to test their claim to light-resistance,
    though...
     
    Senti, Dec 28, 2003
    #7
  8. Watcher of the Skies

    Phil Guest

    You mean I can no longer play my 78's? Bugger!
     
    Phil, Dec 28, 2003
    #8
  9. Watcher of the Skies

    JWooden271 Guest

    Does anyone have any idea how long the ink will last on the
    If kept in a dark, cool, and dry place, they should last as long as you need
    them to.
    Well, if you put the prints under glass, they should stand up for a while,
    sometimes a decade or more. At least, as far as I know.
     
    JWooden271, Dec 29, 2003
    #9
  10. Watcher of the Skies

    pmelissakis Guest

    Longevity depends on the ink and paper.
    Check with the manufacturer.
    Red River Paper has a lot of info.

    Or do a google on archival ink jet printing

    Pete
     
    pmelissakis, Dec 29, 2003
    #10
  11. I've got 18 year old CD's in my collection now. They play okay.
     
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?R=F4g=EAr?=, Dec 29, 2003
    #11
  12. Watcher of the Skies

    roofguy Guest

    There's a lot of misinformation out there

    For one, no one really knows "the best"

    We sure know the ordinary. Printing (inkjet) photographic images o
    glossy paper and storing them in open, circulating air will result in
    severly damged image within one year, regardless of which ink or pape
    is used, and pretty much regardless of how much light strikes the image

    Light was the threat during the '90s. Any image exposed to light wa
    destroyed pretty quickly. During the late 90s, light came to b
    conquered, but circulating air was not. Sometimes described as "airbor
    contaminants" or "ozone", the real problem is that circulating ai
    causes erosion of the physical ink which sits up high on glossy paper

    Matte paper is FAR better. A matte image will last for at least fiv
    years in almost any context, and with $3 ink cartridges just as well a
    the manufacturer's ink

    Great claims have been made during the last two years about longevity
    Check the small print. ALL of them are with regards to prints protecte
    from free air

    So back to the question. The answer is, we really don't know the best
    We do know that it would involve acid-free paper and images protecte
    from both air and light. It may be decades, it may even be centuries, w
    just don't know

    Now some quote a firm known as "Wilhelm Research". Observe one thin
    about Wilhelm: they "certified" that the original Epson 1270 print
    would last 75 years. Within three months of the the release of th
    Epson 1270 and it's Epson ink, there came the first reports of "orang
    shift" in the prints. Subsequent investigation showed that this orang
    shift could appear within ten days. Some difference between ten day
    and 75 years

    The fallout from that fiasco was the small print regarding exposur
    to open air

    What else is there that Wilhelm "forgot" to think about when takin
    money to "certify" longevity


    -
    Posted via MooTal
    http://mootalk.com
     
    roofguy, Dec 29, 2003
    #12
  13. Watcher of the Skies

    Bishoop Guest

    | Geoff Pearson wrote:
    |
    | > | >
    | >>if you are going to archive the documents--why print??
    | >>burn to cd/dvd---make multiple copies on different brands if you are
    | >
    | > that
    | >
    | >>worried
    | >>
    | >
    | > message
    | >
    | >>| >>
    | >>>A two part question for the same topic.
    | >
    | >
    | > CD and DVD will be gone within 20 years - cf. 78rpm, LPs, 8" floppies,
    | > 8-track. Only paper will survive.


    |
    | I've got 18 year old CD's in my collection now. They play okay.

    Here's a link to some info on CD-R longevity. All CDs are not created
    equal.

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/54/32593.html

    The discussion here was about CD-Rs available to the general public and I
    think you are talking about 18 year old pre-recorded commercial audio CDs.

    I also have commercial audio CDs that play as well as the day I bought them
    at least 18 years ago.
    |
     
    Bishoop, Dec 29, 2003
    #13
  14. Watcher of the Skies

    Bishoop Guest

    | There's a lot of misinformation out there.
    |
    | For one, no one really knows "the best".
    |
    | We sure know the ordinary. Printing (inkjet) photographic images on
    | glossy paper and storing them in open, circulating air will result in a
    | severly damged image within one year, regardless of which ink or paper
    | is used, and pretty much regardless of how much light strikes the image.
    |
    | Light was the threat during the '90s. Any image exposed to light was
    | destroyed pretty quickly. During the late 90s, light came to be
    | conquered, but circulating air was not. Sometimes described as "airborn
    | contaminants" or "ozone", the real problem is that circulating air
    | causes erosion of the physical ink which sits up high on glossy paper.
    |
    | Matte paper is FAR better. A matte image will last for at least five
    | years in almost any context, and with $3 ink cartridges just as well as
    | the manufacturer's ink.
    |
    | Great claims have been made during the last two years about longevity.
    | Check the small print. ALL of them are with regards to prints protected
    | from free air.
    |
    | So back to the question. The answer is, we really don't know the best.
    | We do know that it would involve acid-free paper and images protected
    | from both air and light. It may be decades, it may even be centuries, we
    | just don't know.
    |
    | Now some quote a firm known as "Wilhelm Research". Observe one thing
    | about Wilhelm: they "certified" that the original Epson 1270 prints
    | would last 75 years. Within three months of the the release of the
    | Epson 1270 and it's Epson ink, there came the first reports of "orange
    | shift" in the prints. Subsequent investigation showed that this orange
    | shift could appear within ten days. Some difference between ten days
    | and 75 years.
    |
    | The fallout from that fiasco was the small print regarding exposure
    | to open air.
    |
    | What else is there that Wilhelm "forgot" to think about when taking
    | money to "certify" longevity?
    |
    |
    |
    | --
    | Posted via MooTalk
    | http://mootalk.com

    Well written and really points out that YMMV depending on ink, paper and
    ambient conditions.
     
    Bishoop, Dec 29, 2003
    #14
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