If you have 4GB, are you getting 4GB?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by David J Taylor, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. I haven't found a use for them in Win32 and have never used them. If the
    user takes basic steps to secure their computer by using a modified HOSTS
    file and other tweaks they will be on their way to having a bullet proof
    system. From personal experience I have seen people that get their machines
    compromised are the ones that get duped into clicking on or opening things
    they shouldn't be opening, especially from things sent by total strangers.
    These are the people with lacking computer skills that aren't even advanced
    enough to be called novices. Third party "protections" aren't a substitute
    for common sense and user skills. A dirt cheap router or switch will fill
    the bill as well.







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 28, 2006
    #41
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  2. Yes, good point. Sure, you can always go higher with a fixed sized
    pagefile, but your performance gains shrink to the point were it is
    comparable with letting Windows do the work for you. At least this has been
    my personal experience doing this. I even set the pagefile to a separate HD
    (U320 SCSI RAID) from which the OS is on and the gains we negligible over
    what Windows management is doing. I also found resizing and defragging
    hasn't been much of an issue for me either since most of this is happening
    when my system has been idle for some time. I came to the conclusion, at
    least for my operating style, that a fixed pagefile is equivalent to a
    placebo in a double-blind test and it is near impossible to distinguish
    which one is being used.







    Rita
     
    Rita Ä Berkowitz, Jan 28, 2006
    #42
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  3. Rita, whilst I agree with your ideas, I still prefer that added layer!

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jan 29, 2006
    #43
  4. David J Taylor

    Paul J Gans Guest

    No. It is limited by the swap space. And that depends on how
    the swap space is set up.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jan 29, 2006
    #44
  5. David J Taylor

    Paul J Gans Guest

    If you are going to run 64-bit Windows on that same machine,
    you will have to change the processor, won't you? And will
    your present machine take one of the new chips?

    I assume that you have already looked into this. In that
    case, since the 64-bit OS will address the full 4 GB, I'd
    go for the 4 GB.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jan 29, 2006
    #45
  6. David J Taylor

    Paul J Gans Guest

    Thanks Al. I'm about to install CS2 and that sounds
    useful.

    --- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jan 29, 2006
    #46
  7. David J Taylor

    Paul J Gans Guest

    PC bootloader ROMs back in the old DOS days were often located
    at the extreme high end of the addressable memory space.

    Nobody had that much memory back then.

    ----- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jan 29, 2006
    #47
  8. David J Taylor

    Paul J Gans Guest

    It also is a function of the motherboard. There are many
    32-bit motherboards out there that will not see a full 4 GB
    in spite of having the slots for that much memory.

    I don't think we yet know what will become "standard" on
    64-bit motherboards.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jan 29, 2006
    #48
  9. David J Taylor

    Paul J Gans Guest

    Good advice.

    Or read the net using a unix clone on your ISP's machine which
    is what I'm doing right now.

    Of course my Windows machine talking to my ISP is sitting behind
    a router also acting as a hardware firewall.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
     
    Paul J Gans, Jan 29, 2006
    #49
  10. The PC I'm talking about already has a 64-bit processor - the AMD 4400 X2
    as it happens. Precisely why I'm staying with the 4GB.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jan 29, 2006
    #50
  11. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    That will help, somewhat. However, no matter how fast your HD is,
    swapping is vastly slower than RAM. My 'virtual memory' shows as
    however much free space is on my C: drive, which is about 55GB on this
    machine.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #51
  12. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Keeping it on another physical drive IS advantageous, but keeping it on
    another partition of the same physical drive only makes the swap process
    slower, although it may avoid the fragmentation problems.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #52
  13. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    My experience as well. A good defrag program, like Diskeeper, will
    minimize this problem.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #53
  14. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Letting Windows manage the swapfile is usually the best approach. Have
    tried it both ways, and the difference is not perceptible. I would
    rather not set an arbitrary swapfile size and find hours into a process
    that it wasn't enough.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #54
  15. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    There is always overhead, and the memory management depends a lot on
    what chipset your computer uses (and what OS). Many computers also
    share main memory with the graphics system, which further erodes your
    free ram.
    Still, 3.2GB is much better than a bit under 1GB.... right?
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #55
  16. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    While I agree that the best protection is an informed user, who follows
    the 'safe hex' program, an anti-virus and firewall program are useful to
    alert you to attempts to compromise your system, and might save you from
    things like the Blaster worm. Keeping the OS updated regularly is also
    mandatory in this environment.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #56
  17. David J Taylor

    Ron Hunter Guest

    That should keep you in CPU cycles for a few years. Care to trade for
    my 512MB AMD Athlon XP (1.8Ghz)? Grin.
    I have been thinking of replacing it, but the trauma of moving
    everything over to a new machine is daunting.
     
    Ron Hunter, Jan 29, 2006
    #57
  18. That's a given even on my SATA RAID0 running two WD Raptor 10,000 rpm
    drives.
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Jan 29, 2006
    #58
  19. Ron Hunter wrote:
    []
    That's exactly how I feel!

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jan 29, 2006
    #59
  20. Yes, I'm not quite sure how I will schedule the move just yet. I expect
    to use the Windows "Files and Settings Transfer Wizard. Need the desk
    space for two PCs as well. Plus I'm just installing a small FreeBSD
    system....

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jan 29, 2006
    #60
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