IBM punch cards

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Jim, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. Jim

    Jim Guest

    Anyone know (remember) how many cards were in a box of IBM punch cards?
    I remember it as 2000. But I'm old and forgetful.

    I'm also looking for a picture of box of cards.

    thanks in advance.

    Jim
     
    Jim, Feb 27, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Jim

    Mike Easter Guest

    2000 is correct.

    <snip>
    the University of California at Davis Central Stores Online Catalog
    listed cards as recently as 1996:

    Catalog Item Number: 71510-109
    IBM CARD, BLANK TOP, LEFT CUT, 2000/BOX
    Also known as data processing or keypunch cards.
    Price: $42.085 per Box
    Prices are current as of: Mar 2 06:00 (1996)
    </snip>
     
    Mike Easter, Feb 27, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Yes, 2000 cards per box. The price was about $35 a box. You can still
    buy them but they are more expensive now.

    --
    Steve Wolstenholme Neural Planner Software Ltd

    EasyNN-plus. The easy way to build neural networks.

    http://www.easynn.com
     
    Steve Wolstenholme, Feb 27, 2007
    #3
  4. Jim

    Tester Guest

    Until about a year or two ago, there was a factory which made fancy
    clothy not far from the Queens end of the 59th Street Bridge in NYC
    and they had the predecessor of the Hollerinth (IBM) card, a Jacquard
    Loom.

    That was a loom which could be programmed through punch cards to have
    all sorts of thread patterns.

    Herman. Hollerinth invented his cards (along with sorting and counting
    machines) for the 1890 U.S. Census.

    The U.S. has a census every 10 years and it had taken 4 years to count
    the 1880 census and they said it might take 10 years for the 1890
    census due to all the immigrants and the states with lots of
    immigrants were screaming about getting cheated in the House of
    Representatives and Electoral College.
     
    Tester, Feb 27, 2007
    #4
  5. Jim

    Tester Guest

    Until about a year or two ago, there was a factory which made fancy
    clothy not far from the Queens end of the 59th Street Bridge in NYC
    and they had the predecessor of the Hollerinth (IBM) card, a Jacquard
    Loom.

    That was a loom which could be programmed through punch cards to have
    all sorts of thread patterns.

    Herman. Hollerinth invented his cards (along with sorting and counting
    machines) for the 1890 U.S. Census.

    The U.S. has a census every 10 years and it had taken 4 years to count
    the 1880 census and they said it might take 10 years for the 1890
    census due to all the immigrants and the states with lots of
    immigrants were screaming about getting cheated in the House of
    Representatives and Electoral College.
     
    Tester, Feb 27, 2007
    #5
  6. Jim

    Rick Merrill Guest

    For that there's Mastercard.

    Drawing a diagonal line on the edge of your deck in case they
    get dropped - priceless!
     
    Rick Merrill, Feb 27, 2007
    #6
  7. Jim

    Frosty Guest

    Frosty, Feb 28, 2007
    #7
  8. Jim

    Frosty Guest

    I though you people used toilet paper tubes, not IBM cards.
     
    Frosty, Mar 1, 2007
    #8
  9. Jim

    BitBucket

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    This brings back some memories standing in front of sorters, comparators, interpreters, accumulators, and various other unit record machines. Early 70's when store rooms were stuffed with boxes of punch cards. I was looking at rating contemporary storage in terms of punch card weight.

    I have some cards stashed away and got a weight of 2.42 grams per card. Granted the cards are punched so the blank weight would be slightly higher.
    Ok

    cards/Gb = 1024^3 / 80 = 13,421,772
    tons/Gb = ( 13,421,772 * 2.42 ) / 453.59(grams/lbs) = 35.8 tons

    I'm looking at a PCIe card with 640Gb of nand flash ( fusionIO, IOdrive ) so
    the SSD while hold

    640 * 35.8 = 22.9 Kilotons of punch card capacity.

    Times have changed.
     
    BitBucket, Aug 8, 2008
    #9
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.