How to tell a rank amateur from a seasoned one, or a pro

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by RichA, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. RichA

    Peter Guest


    And this has what to do with your definition?
    I am not trying to convince you. That is a waste of time. I just don't want
    to see a newbie to be mislead.
     
    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #61
    1. Advertisements

  2. RichA

    Peter Guest


    Yup! Very easy to do in wildlife photography. Just pick your spot and let
    the wildlife come to you.
     
    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #62
    1. Advertisements

  3. []
    Works with penguins in Antarctica, certainly. Not sure it's so handy with
    lions or bears, though.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 2, 2010
    #63
  4. RichA

    Peter Guest


    Works well with birds of prey too, especially eagles. Just put the fish in
    an enclosed area and wait for the eagle, or osprey to pounce. <\end tag>
    :)
     
    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #64
  5. RichA

    SMS Guest

    LOL, just carry some bait and put it exactly where you want the animal
    to be, then pre-focus, and wait. While this would be illegal if you were
    shooting the animal with a gun, it'd be okay just for photographing the
    animal (unless you're in a place where feeding wildlife is forbidden).
    It's the perfect workaround to slow contrast-detect auto-focus.
     
    SMS, Jul 2, 2010
    #65
  6. RichA

    Peter Guest


    You don't need bait. Just smear some estrus scent from the female animal of
    your choice. The male will smell it and become so horny that he will stand
    and pose. It's and old animal training secret that works even better if you
    are lucky enough to find a male who hasn't been laid in months.
     
    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #66
  7. RichA

    tony cooper Guest

    If you can get close enough to the female to obtain her estrus scent,
    why do you need to wait for a male? Just tell the female that her
    butt doesn't look big in that fur and snap away.
     
    tony cooper, Jul 2, 2010
    #67
  8. RichA

    Jeff Jones Guest

    Only in the minds of beginner snapshooters. Thanks for revealing that about
    yourself.
     
    Jeff Jones, Jul 2, 2010
    #68
  9. RichA

    Jeff Jones Guest

    No, it's very easy to do in ALL situations. Half-press on something near
    your subject or near to where you know it's going to be. (The art of
    photography is knowing your subject even more than your camera.) Shutter
    response from half-press to full is near instantaneous at the moment you
    need to capture the shot. While you're learning this most basic of
    digital-camera skills, go learn about "hyperfocal" too. No wonder that any
    of you who post photos never have them properly focused.

    I swear, don't any of you know how to properly use auto-focusing modes on
    any cameras? I'd hate to see what would happen with manual-only cameras in
    your hands. This is why you fools so easily reveal to everyone what base
    beginners (or never used any camera) that most of you are. And then you
    wonder how I know. With things this simple and basic to using digital
    cameras, and you don't even know this much. How much more obvious can you
    get.
     
    Jeff Jones, Jul 2, 2010
    #69
  10. RichA

    Jeff Jones Guest

    Thanks for proving again that you've never used any camera and that you
    don't know one thing about wildlife photography as well.
     
    Jeff Jones, Jul 2, 2010
    #70
  11. RichA

    Jeff Jones Guest


    Thanks for proving again that you've never used any camera and that you
    don't know one thing about wildlife photography as well.
     
    Jeff Jones, Jul 2, 2010
    #71
  12. RichA

    Jeff Jones Guest

    Already been done. A few cameras continually capture images at high
    frame-rates, then it pauses the capturing of frames when you actually press
    the shutter. Allowing you to select from frames captured previous to the
    time you actually pressed the shutter button. This allows you to get those
    images where you sometimes say to yourself, "Damn, I'm going to miss that
    shot!" Not from any shutter-lag mind you, but from your own senses not
    being quick enough to predict the unforeseen.

    This is what you people get for not knowing much, or more often nothing at
    all, about the P&S cameras that you always go on and on about as ignorantly
    as you all do.
     
    Jeff Jones, Jul 2, 2010
    #72
  13. RichA

    Jeff Jones Guest

    LOL!!!!!!!

    Now that's funny. You talking about "newbies" as if they are something
    other than yourself.

    HAHAHAHHAHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    Jeff Jones, Jul 2, 2010
    #73
  14. RichA

    Pete Guest

    Have you finished yet or is there some more intellectual stimulation pending?
     
    Pete, Jul 2, 2010
    #74
  15. RichA

    Peter Guest

    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #75
  16. RichA

    Pete Guest

    That explains why deer are such nervous animals.
     
    Pete, Jul 2, 2010
    #76
  17. RichA

    Peter Guest


    My only comment about the troll is
    Whoosh!
     
    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #77
  18. RichA

    Peter Guest


    Jinx <G>
     
    Peter, Jul 2, 2010
    #78
  19. Indeed, if the action is such that you can predict where appropriate
    action will occur. Easy enough in most racing, baseball, basketball and
    football. Not so easy in soccer, lacrosse and hockey, except for Goalie
    action.
     
    John McWilliams, Jul 2, 2010
    #79
  20. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    Careful with that stuff. Remember this guy
     
    J. Clarke, Jul 2, 2010
    #80
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.