How to print & frame a roughly 5'x10' google satellite view on awall

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dr Rig, Nov 19, 2010.

  1. Dr Rig

    Dr Rig Guest

    I have a wall that I want to cover with roughly a 5 foot by 10 foot
    "picture" frame of a google satellite view of the surrounding area.

    Any idea how to accomplish the various technical parts?
    - For the 'frame', I'm thinking of making it out of pine
    - For the 'glass', I'm wondering how big a sheet of thin plastic I can buy
    - For the 'printing', I'm not sure, but maybe Kinkos can print it?

    Have any of you ever created a huge frame and/or printing of google maps?

    Can you give me some pointers to get me going in the right direction?
     
    Dr Rig, Nov 19, 2010
    #1
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  2. Dr Rig

    chaniarts Guest

    slats of any kind of wood are easily made
    how much $ do you want to allocate to it? large sheets are expensive. look
    up tap plastics in your yellw pages if you're in or near a reasonably large
    city. you can get large sheets of glass too, but it would be pretty
    dangerous to handle if you're not used to doing so. glass is heavier too.
    96" is the usual largest single dimension. larger would be custom, and a lot
    more $.
    there are local companies in most cities that provide this service. look up
    mapping services. again, it's pretty expensive.
    the largest i've framed is 8'x2'.

    you'll also need to get it pressed onto something to keep it flat. foamcore
    is usual, but finding a press large enough for 10' is going to be hard, and
    $.

    have you thought about sending a custom image to a company that makes wall
    sized murals? installing it in strips like wallpaper, then installing wood
    frame onto the wall, would be easier and a LOT cheaper.
     
    chaniarts, Nov 19, 2010
    #2
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  3. Dr Rig

    Tegger Guest



    Kinko's will just farm it out to a "large format digital printing"
    company. You might as well go direct.

    Here's a start:
    <http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...gital+printing&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=>

    These firms can not only print your image, but dry-mount it to a
    suitable rigid substrate. You can frame it later if you wish, or
    they can frame it for you.

    They can also print directly to something like Sintra or Komatex,
    which are already rigid enough not to need mounting.

    A BIG warning though, your file had better be of pretty high-resolution,
    or it will look really crummy when printed that big (the company will
    probably refuse to output a file they consider too low). You want
    minimum 80 dpi at the native size (5'x10'). The appropriate file
    will likely be on the order of 20 megabytes. Or more.

    JPEGs are dangerous to print large, since they tend to have odd
    squiggly areas at edges between color blocks.
     
    Tegger, Nov 19, 2010
    #3
  4. Dr Rig

    Craig Guest

    All I can offer are a couple of freeware poster-printing apps:

    Easy Poster Printer:
    http://gdsoftware.dk/

    PosterRazor
    http://posterazor.sourceforge.net/

    Haven't tried either.
     
    Craig, Nov 19, 2010
    #4
  5. 1. I have no advice about printing.
    2. For mounting, you should probably use ordinary picture
    technology. Artists' supply stores sell edge mouldings and
    hardware for single canvases up to 5 ft. by 10, and can advise
    how many interior braces you need to avert later bending out of
    true. After constructing the empty frame, canvas is stretched over
    it (tightened by a special tool) and tacked along each outside edge.
    You can glue the photo to this rigid but light structure, and add an
    ornamental frame (using framing stock, corners cut with a 45-deg. jig.)
     
    Don Phillipson, Nov 19, 2010
    #5
  6. Dr Rig

    H-Man Guest

    Let's see,
    60x120" @ 80dpi=46,080,000 pixels
    At 24bit color depth, that's 138,240,000 bytes for that file. Not too
    terribly huge, but remember your looking to start with a 46 MegaPixel
    image. You would have to patch together a number of Google satellite
    images to get this to work. Then see if you can find a print shop that can
    do billboard type stuff. This usually comes like wallpaper, in strips.
     
    H-Man, Nov 19, 2010
    #6
  7. Dr Rig

    Roy Guest

    Your "project" is totally impractical and potentially very expensive.
    Get someone to paint you a mural is my recommendation.
    ==
     
    Roy, Nov 19, 2010
    #7
  8. Dr Rig

    Tegger Guest




    There's lots of competition these days; prices have tumbled. OP can
    expect to pay about $200 or so, depending on his area.






    A dry-mounter is normally used to bond flexible prints to a rigid
    substrate. These are everywhere, and are old technology. The 60" size is
    very common. I ran one of these (a Seal 600) as part of my previous job,
    eight years ago. They go up to 72", I believe. But that's the web width.
    Finished sizes are typically about an inch less either side for trim, so
    for a 60" web, figure on 59-58" finished size.

    But... current technology now allows the large-format people to print
    directly to a rigid substrate, which is a major advance in convenience
    and durability. The current inks are very tough, and are even UV-stable.
    They do not need an over-laminate for protection.

    And it's not wise to use foamcore for a print that big; it's too
    fragile. Sintra/Komatex is better. Sintra is foamed styrene, and it's
    relatively light for its rigidity; it's very popular these days for
    digital printing. The digital people buy the stuff by the skidload.





    I didn't think of this before, but OP may wish to have the print split
    up into 2 or 3 sections, which would be joined up when he frames it.
    You'd have a seam, but its visibility would be minimized with proper
    joining. This way the print size will fall within the substrate size
    (usually 4' x 8'), and be more transportable as well. The digital print
    company can help him with these details.

    Our supplier of such things has this brand-new machine from Europe (I
    wish I could remember the maker). The entire side opens up like a garage
    door for maintenance and human access, but stock goes in a slot at one
    end and goes out the other. It prints its entire 72" or so width ALL AT
    ONCE, but make 4 passes to lay down the full density of ink. Each pass
    is UV-cured as it's laid down. It's absolutely amazing how FAST this
    thing is.
     
    Tegger, Nov 19, 2010
    #8
  9. Dr Rig

    J. Clarke Guest

    Plexiglass 5x10 feet can be had for around 200 bucks delivered.

    Frame can be anything reasonable.

    Epson sells printers that print more than 5 feet wide (they're used for
    vehicle wraps among other things), so getting it printed should not be
    an issue.
     
    J. Clarke, Nov 19, 2010
    #9
  10. Dr Rig

    Tegger Guest




    That's 132MB. But then you don't really need 24-bit pixel depth; 16 will
    do. That takes the file down to 87MB. Even if you go down to 8 bit, which
    is still quite acceptable for digital printing, it's 44MB. Still bigger
    than I'd guessed.

    We run digital stuff all the time, but our files contain vector and
    transparencies in addition to raster components, so I was guessing on the
    OP's needed file size. Most of our files are in the 20-40MB range. Now that
    I think of it, I wasn't counting any linked Photoshop images, which can be
    200MB or more. Add those to our usual Illustrator files, and we're /way/ up
    there.
     
    Tegger, Nov 19, 2010
    #10
  11. From: "Dr Rig" <>

    | I have a wall that I want to cover with roughly a 5 foot by 10 foot
    | "picture" frame of a google satellite view of the surrounding area.

    | Any idea how to accomplish the various technical parts?
    | - For the 'frame', I'm thinking of making it out of pine
    | - For the 'glass', I'm wondering how big a sheet of thin plastic I can buy
    | - For the 'printing', I'm not sure, but maybe Kinkos can print it?

    | Have any of you ever created a huge frame and/or printing of google maps?

    | Can you give me some pointers to get me going in the right direction?

    LOL, a 5' x 10' print for FREE ?
    You did post this to a freeware group!

    I use a HP DesignJet T1120 and that is only 44" wide.
    I could split this job into two halves using PhotShop.
    Top: 2.5' x 10' and Bottom: 2.5' x 10'

    Was that glossy or matte ?
     
    David H. Lipman, Nov 19, 2010
    #11
  12. Dr Rig

    Cliff Hartle Guest

    As others have said, the biggest issue you have is that when you blow up the
    image that either you capture off Google Maps or Google Earth you are going
    loose all detail. Your house you can recognize when you see it on your
    computer screen will only be like 6 pixels in size 6 really big pixels.

    I know, I have a large format printer, its a small one onlt 30 inches, and
    you need images of huge size, like 300 meg.

    To see what it would look like open the pic and blow it up like 3000% and
    you will see why you will get.

    Oh and it going to cost a ton of money.
     
    Cliff Hartle, Nov 20, 2010
    #12
  13. Dr Rig

    M.L. Guest

    +1 for PosterRazor.

    Poster apps print your pic over multiple letter-sized pages that you
    stitch together to form a single large picture. Best for enlarging
    vector graphics. I have my doubts that Google satellite images are
    high enough resolution for such an enlargement. However, this method
    will cost little to experiment.
     
    M.L., Nov 20, 2010
    #13
  14. Dr Rig

    peter Guest


    Doing so may very well be a copyright violation. Check with Google.
     
    peter, Nov 20, 2010
    #14
  15. Dr Rig

    ASCII Guest

    When I got my new SX30-IS a month or so ago it didn't include a hard copy
    manual so I burn't the [pdf] to a CD and called Kinkos (now FEDEX) and was
    told some rambling spiel about permission from Canon by some guy that didn't
    sound like he was as interested in making a sale as discouraging one. Well
    last month I was in the neighborhood and still had the CD so I dropped in in
    person and the professional woman at the counter stuck it in her computer to
    see how many pages it had, quoted me a price w/binding and front and back
    covers, and upon my OK had the thing done in short order. I paid and thanked
    her and left with the company's reputation restored. It was done on standard
    letter size (8.6x11) paper so it's even easier to read than the one that came
    with my S2-IS years ago.
     
    ASCII, Nov 20, 2010
    #15
  16. Dr Rig

    Joe Guest

    Have you considered going the old-fashioned route and using a fairly powerful
    slide projector? The bottom line could prove to be less expensive over time.
    The many advantages are obvious. Slides are cheap, easy to replace, modify
    and update. You need nothing on your display wall but specialized paint, or
    better yet a 5' x 10', or even better yet 6' x 12', projection screen. For
    example, see http://www.bigpicturebigsound.com/projector-screen-1.shtml .
    Also google projection screens large OR giant OR wall OR white OR paint

    The biggest advantage of all is, what if you want to display something else?
    Another big advantage is that you can mount the slide projector just above
    the elevation of anyone walking or standing in the room. Google maps, and
    practically all other on-line sources of maps, satellite images, etc., are
    updated from time to time, depending on the areas which are being mapped and
    imaged. No matter what mosaic of images you may grab from Google, they will
    become obsolete before long. So why photograph what you can show updated?

    You could bypass any slideshow options and go to direct Internet feeds
    projected onto the screen/wall. That would be my preference, the live feed.
    For example, I would love to see Da Vinci's Mona Lisa projected onto my main
    living room wall via live HD camera + audio feed from the Louvre, live and
    in high definition. That should be free to the world.
     
    Joe, Nov 20, 2010
    #16
  17. A US decorator projected the Sistine Chapel onto his living room wall,
    illustrated in C. Ray Smith's Supermannerism: New Attitudes in Post-
    Modern Architecture (Dutton 1977).
     
    Don Phillipson, Nov 20, 2010
    #17
  18. Dr Rig

    gpsman Guest

    gpsman, Nov 20, 2010
    #18
  19. Dr Rig

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I have a wall that I want to cover with roughly a 5 foot by 10 foot
    : "picture" frame of a google satellite view of the surrounding area.
    :
    : Any idea how to accomplish the various technical parts?
    : - For the 'frame', I'm thinking of making it out of pine
    : - For the 'glass', I'm wondering how big a sheet of thin plastic I can buy
    : - For the 'printing', I'm not sure, but maybe Kinkos can print it?

    You can print it yourself if you have access to a decent inkjet plotter. We
    have one at work that takes four-foot rolls of paper, and they make them for
    rolls even wider than that. The downside is that such large pictures are very
    unwieldy. Framing and hanging are the hard part unless, as someone suggested,
    you glue it up like wallpaper.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Nov 20, 2010
    #19
  20. Dr Rig

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Ever seen a wet inkjet print?
    I would not advise to use it as walpaper.
    That would turn into a diaster.
    There is hoever doublesided tape, in quite wide
    rolls, that might do it.
     
    Sjouke Burry, Nov 20, 2010
    #20
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