How to import digital photos from iPad to Linux using USB cable?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Pat Wilson, May 9, 2014.

  1. Pat Wilson

    Pat Wilson Guest

    I'm having lots of trouble using the default Shotwell application
    on Ubuntu 13.10 to import photos from the ipad Air (iOS 7).

    How do YOU import photos from your iPad to your Linux PC using USB cable?

    I keep failing:
    http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2935/13956264620_b17b60c7d6_h.jpg

    Every five seconds (seemingly forever), I get the iPad question:
    Trust This Computer?
    Your settings and data will be accessible from this computer
    when connected.
    [TRUST?] [DON'T TRUST?]

    And, at the same time, I get the Shotwell error:
    Shotwell: Unable to fetch previews from the camera:
    Unspecified error (-1)

    Googling, I find it's likely a problem with the iPad not being
    recognized as a camera on Linux PCs.

    Here's what my 'lsusb" command reveals on Linux:
    Bus 002 Device `125: ID 05ac:12ab Apple, Inc.

    Do you have further debugging commands?

    Since I can't be the only one who wishes to import photos from the
    iPad to Linux, may I ask you Linux & camera experts what solution
    YOU use to import your videos & photos by USB cable from your iPad
    to your Linux PC?
     
    Pat Wilson, May 9, 2014
    #1
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  2. Pat Wilson

    TJ Guest

    Don't know how much help I'll be, as I don't have an iPad - I have an
    Android tablet. And I don't use Ubuntu and Gnome - I use Mageia 4 and
    KDE. But for what it's worth...

    I use KDE's Dolphin file manager to transfer photos from my tablet - or
    from my cameras, for that matter. Dolphin deals with the devices as it
    would a thumb drive or flash card reader, and mounts the file system.
    (FAT32 on the cameras. I haven't looked at the tablet's "internal SD
    card" file system, but I believe it is EXT4.) I can then copy the files
    to my PC's hard drive and do what I want with them from there.

    Now, my cameras and tablet use a standard jpeg file type. If the iPad is
    different, well...

    TJ
     
    TJ, May 9, 2014
    #2
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  3. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    Don't know how much help I'll be, as I don't have an iPad - I have an
    Android tablet. And I don't use Ubuntu and Gnome - I use Mageia 4 and
    KDE. But for what it's worth...

    I use KDE's Dolphin file manager to transfer photos from my tablet - or
    from my cameras, for that matter. Dolphin deals with the devices as it
    would a thumb drive or flash card reader, and mounts the file system.
    (FAT32 on the cameras. I haven't looked at the tablet's "internal SD
    card" file system, but I believe it is EXT4.) I can then copy the files
    to my PC's hard drive and do what I want with them from there.

    Now, my cameras and tablet use a standard jpeg file type. If the iPad is
    different, well...[/QUOTE]

    again, the ipad shows up as a normal digital camera and it shoots jpeg
    like any other digital camera does. any software that works for a
    digital camera will work for an ipad.
     
    Guest, May 9, 2014
    #3
  4. Pat Wilson

    Whiskers Guest

    I'm iPad-free, so I can't experiment. But
    <https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Shotwell> could have some clues. Shotwell
    seems to use gphoto as its 'camera detector', which should be able to
    handle an iPad <http://gphoto.org/>
    <http://gphoto.org/proj/libgphoto2/support.php> - can you put the iPad
    into "PTP mode" before connecting it to your computer?
     
    Whiskers, May 9, 2014
    #4
  5. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    I'm iPad-free, so I can't experiment. But
    <https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Shotwell> could have some clues. Shotwell
    seems to use gphoto as its 'camera detector', which should be able to
    handle an iPad <http://gphoto.org/>
    <http://gphoto.org/proj/libgphoto2/support.php> - can you put the iPad
    into "PTP mode" before connecting it to your computer?[/QUOTE]

    it connects in ptp mode, as other digital cameras do.

    there is no need to do anything special nor is there a need for special
    software. just pretend it's a nikon or canon camera.
     
    Guest, May 10, 2014
    #5
  6. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    there isn't any problem importing photos from an ios device either.
    it's exactly the same as any other camera.
     
    Guest, May 10, 2014
    #6
  7. Pat Wilson

    casey.o Guest

    I know nothing about Ipads, adn little abotu linux, but after reading
    this thread, I had a thought. Why not upload your photos to one of
    those free photo websites, and then download them on the other device.

    Just a thought, maybe this is not even possible, but it was a
    thought....
     
    casey.o, May 10, 2014
    #7
  8. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    I know nothing about Ipads, adn little abotu linux, but after reading
    this thread, I had a thought. Why not upload your photos to one of
    those free photo websites, and then download them on the other device.

    Just a thought, maybe this is not even possible, but it was a
    thought....[/QUOTE]

    it's possible, including on the fly as they're taken. however, it does
    need wifi or cellular service.
     
    Guest, May 10, 2014
    #8
  9. Pat Wilson

    Whiskers Guest

    [...]

    You seem not to be alone: "How to Fix the iPad and iPhone 'Trust' Bug on
    Ubuntu"
    <http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/03/ios7-ipad-iphone-ubuntu-trust>

    Alternatives to using a USB cable do exist.

    If the memory card holding the photos can be removed from the iPad, then
    it should be possible to read it directly or through an adaptor.

    You could use FTP (or SFTP or SSH) over your local WiFi - an FTP client
    on the iPad and an FTP server on the computer (or the other way around)
    should make it possible to copy or move files between the two - that's
    what I do with my Android smartphone.

    Is there a 'network accessible storage' (NAS) device already set up on
    your local network and accessible to the iPad over WiFi?

    Bluetooth can be made to handle file transfers.

    Failing those options, use 'the cloud' (eg Dropbox) to upload from the
    iPad and download to the computer.
     
    Whiskers, May 10, 2014
    #9
  10. Pat Wilson

    PeterN Guest

    it's possible, including on the fly as they're taken. however, it does
    need wifi or cellular service.
    [/QUOTE]

    Helpful answer.
     
    PeterN, May 10, 2014
    #10
  11. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    it isn't saving the trust ticket properly.
    most of which are more hassle than using a usb cable. just boot into
    windows and be done with it. why make things harder than necessary.
    there is no memory card on an ipad nor is there a memory card on many
    android devices.
    unless the app is designed to copy all the photos at once, that will be
    a huge pain in the ass.
    a nas doesn't matter.
    not at a speed that is useful for photos and certainly not videos.
    ipads don't support file transfer over bluetooth for that reason. it
    sucks, and there are much better ways to do it.
    the cloud is the most convenient method, and with photostream, it's
    transparent to the user.
     
    Guest, May 10, 2014
    #11
  12. Pat Wilson

    Whiskers Guest

    Not using a USB cable is nearly always less hassle than using a USB
    cable. Particularly when using the USB cable doesn't work at all, as in
    this instance.

    Booting into Windows only works if you have Windows installed - and
    Windows has USB problems of its own.
    OK. I used the conditional mode to cover that possibility.
    Which could explain why FTP clients usually have means for handling
    whole directories and directory trees, not to mention 'wildcard' or
    'regex' methods for identifying the files to be copied. A web browser
    might not, but who uses a web browser for file management?

    On Linux, "Midnight Commander" (mc) is my preferred file management tool;
    it integrates FTP among all its other abilities. On Android, "Ghost
    Commander" has a similar interface and has plugins for FTP and SFTP among
    other things. There are several 'WiFi file transfer' apps for Android
    which set up a simple FTP server on the device; I like "WIFI FTP" by
    "Nalic". Putting the FTP server on the smartphone or tablet means that
    one can use the file manager or other FTP client on the computer to
    handle all the user input, which is (I find) easier than using a
    touch-screen for intricate selection.
    Although if there is one, it'll be far quicker and entirely more private
    than using 'the cloud'.
    Provided you trust strangers with your files and can handle the costs.
     
    Whiskers, May 11, 2014
    #12
  13. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    Not using a USB cable is nearly always less hassle than using a USB
    cable. Particularly when using the USB cable doesn't work at all, as in
    this instance.[/QUOTE]

    no, because using a usb cable is much faster than the alternatives and
    it's linux that is the issue here, not a cable.
    not really and certainly nothing that affects this situation.
    who said anything about using a web browser?

    whether an app can select more than one photo is up to the app author.
    there are no doubt apps that can, but that doesn't mean all of them
    will do that.
    it will make absolutely no difference whatsoever since the bottleneck
    is the wireless interface, especially if it's cellular.
    encryption and the cloud is free (and with paid options for more space).
     
    Guest, May 11, 2014
    #13
  14. Pat Wilson

    Whiskers Guest

    Ask Apple why they can't stick to industry standards.
     
    Whiskers, May 11, 2014
    #14
  15. no, because using a usb cable is much faster than the alternatives and
    it's linux that is the issue here, not a cable.[/QUOTE]

    How is linux the issue? Most smart phones have a mode in which they look
    like a usb memory device. If the iphone does not, that is a problem with
    the iphone, not with Linux.
    If on windows or on Mac there is some proprietary software then ask
    apple where you can get it for Linux. Since Mac IS unix, the software
    should be readily available.

    .....
    But the talk was about ftp and ftp apps can.
     
    William Unruh, May 11, 2014
    #15
  16. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    they definitely do, much more than other companies.
     
    Guest, May 11, 2014
    #16
  17. Pat Wilson

    Guest Guest

    linux is not saving the trust ticket, so the phone keeps asking to
    trust the device.
    iphones and ipads show up as a standard digital camera and *any*
    software that can copy photos will work.
    there is no need for any proprietary software to copy photos and never
    was.

    the issue is the trust ticket.
    only if the author of the ftp implements the ability to do so. some do,
    some don't.
     
    Guest, May 11, 2014
    #17
  18. Which don't?
     
    William Unruh, May 11, 2014
    #18
  19. Pat Wilson

    Sandman Guest

    It begs the question though - what IS the industry standard for
    transferring files between computers? Is it Samba? FTP? And furthermore,
    what is the industry standard for transferring files from a tablet OS to a
    desktop OS, since that's really what we're talking about?

    And there's also the matter of security vs. industry standards here as
    well. The reason why iOS7 is being picky is because of security, not
    because Apple refuses to adhere to some presumed standard. When you connect
    your iPad to a computer, the iPad asks you if you want to trust the
    computer. If you, by default, has passcode lock on, you can only answer
    this question while being "logged in".

    There are some workaround for this:

    <http://itsfoss.com/mount-iphone-ipad-ios-7-ubuntu-13-10/>
     
    Sandman, May 11, 2014
    #19
  20. You own me a new keyboard

    That is about the worst bullshit you could have come up with
     
    Peter Köhlmann, May 11, 2014
    #20
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