How much should you expect from the store when shopping for a digicam?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by peace to all, Jul 27, 2003.

  1. peace to all

    peace to all Guest

    I'm returning a new camera tomorrow because the shots are one big blur, and
    I'm wondering what you should expect when looking at camera at the store---
    should you expect to be able to take a few sample shots, or go along with
    them when they say that because of the type of battery, they don't keep them
    charged and you will just have to look at the camera "cold" (no memory or
    battery installed)?

    I bet they will ask me if I want to exchange it for another, and I will IF I
    can see some shots taken by it there and then; otherwise, no way!


    I thought about looking at a different brand digicam while I'm there; the
    only problem being sometimes the review of shots on the LCD looks different
    from the shots when you have loaded them into your PC!
     
    peace to all, Jul 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. peace to all

    Zol. Guest

    One thing you can do with some cameras is to zoom in when viewing on the LCD
    Viewfinder - this should be able to show you the detail when you take your
    test shots. Being well armed is probably the best thing to do if you are
    going to take anything back to the store where you bought it from, that way
    you have your `proof` against their `excuses`(thats the wrong word for it
    but you know what I mean). I hope you get it sorted to your satisfaction ...
    Zol.
     
    Zol., Jul 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. peace to all

    Bernard Hill Guest

    In these circumstances I would expect them to take a photo and if they
    can't get a clear picture then refund or replace.

    When choosing, I expect it to be possible to take a photo and check it.
    They may have to supply another memory card or battery but that's up to
    them. Walk out if not.



    Bernard Hill
    Selkirk, Scotland
     
    Bernard Hill, Jul 27, 2003
    #3
  4. peace to all

    Mick Ruthven Guest

    If all your pictures are "one big blur", something is definitely wrong,
    either with the camera or your technique. Are you new to photography and/or
    digital cameras? If so, have someone more experienced with digital cameras,
    preferably with the type you bought, try it. And/or go to the forum for your
    make of camera on dpreview.com and explain your problem.
     
    Mick Ruthven, Jul 27, 2003
    #4
  5. peace to all

    BF Guest

    If I was wanting to know how a camera took pictures I would insist on seeing
    it work and take a couple shots. If that means they have to find a memory
    card, so be it. If they can't do that for you go someplace that will. If you
    don't know what you are getting, you might as well order from the internet
    and save a bunch of money.
    Put the camera on a table or tripod to prove that it is not you moving the
    camera and if everything is still a blur, it is defective.
     
    BF, Jul 27, 2003
    #5


  6. I do agree.....

    I am new to digital photography, but I have a point and shoot already that I
    bought a couple of weeks ago, and it works great, so I don't think it was me
    causing the blur.

    I also made sure everything was set to auto and tried different image sizes
    and used the best of the 2 compression choices they offered.

    It was a bitter disappointment, because although it was only a 2 MP camera,
    it was given a high rating for image quality (which is my main interest
    right now).

    So far using a digicam has been a blast, since I chose entry level to test
    the waters and see if this is something I want to get into as a hobby--- I
    definitely want to graduate to manual controls and a D-SLR in the future!

    Thanks for the replies--- I agree with all of them so far! {:)
     
    Do not forget, Jul 27, 2003
    #6
  7. peace> I'm returning a new camera tomorrow because the shots are one
    peace> big blur, and I'm wondering what you should expect when looking
    peace> at camera at the store---

    If the people at the store are competent, before doing anything else,
    they will try to discover *why* your pictures are ``one big blur.''

    I can think of three possibilities:

    1) The make and model of camera you bought is incapable of
    taking good pictures.

    2) You got a defective camera.

    3) You're doing something wrong and don't realize it.

    I think (3) is much more likely than (2), which is much more likely
    than (1), and if I were working in the store where you bought the
    camera, I would be reluctant to let you look at another one until I
    proved that (3) was not the case. Otherwise, nothing I could do would
    solve your problem.

    So how about taking a few of the of the pictures that are ``one big blur''
    and uploading them to a web site where the rest of us can see them?
     
    Andrew Koenig, Jul 27, 2003
    #7
  8. peace to all

    BF Guest

    You never told us the type of camera. It might be info worth knowing.
     
    BF, Jul 27, 2003
    #8

  9. I would go with 2, Andrew--- but it might have been something I was doing
    wrong--- I wouldn't rule that one out.

    If they can prove it takes crisp shots while I'm there, fine--
    I will admit then that it was me.

    I've dumped the photos and boxed the camera up, so it's a no show as far as
    displaying them.
     
    Digicam zealot, Jul 27, 2003
    #9
  10. Could be, I suppose.
     
    Digicam zealot, Jul 27, 2003
    #10
  11. peace to all

    Lucas Tam Guest

    You bought a defective camera... that happens from time to time. Just
    return it for a new one : )
     
    Lucas Tam, Jul 27, 2003
    #11
  12. peace to all

    John Russell Guest

    If you were taking some pictures in a dimly lit living room, even with
    auto they might come out blurry. It might not be possible for the
    auto settings to set the shutter speed and let in enough light. There
    are some settings like ISO and exposure variation that are over and
    above the shutter speed and aperture that the auto settings cover.

    John
     
    John Russell, Jul 28, 2003
    #12
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