How do I tell if a second hand PC is going to be PXE compliant (network bootable)?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Alan, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Hi All,

    I am just wondering if anyone is able to tell me how to tell (in
    advance of being able to test it) whether a second hand PC will be
    able to boot from the network )PXE Boot)?

    What determines that capability? Is it purely a factor of the network
    card or does the processor (for example) come into it?

    Thanks,

    Alan.
    --

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    Alan, Jul 6, 2006
    #1
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  2. Alan

    shannon Guest

    The BIOS
    You can use a boot floppy if the bios doesn't support it.
     
    shannon, Jul 6, 2006
    #2
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  3. Alan

    jasen Guest

    PXE boot is a BIOS feature, mostly seen on newer hardware (AIUI)

    It may be possible to use a boot floppy to get a network boot.
    or maybe you could use a NIC with a PXE boot ROM.

    (NIC=Network Interface Card)

    Bye.
    Jasen
     
    jasen, Jul 6, 2006
    #3
  4. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Hi Shannon,

    I am quite possibly mixing up two separate things here, but for some
    machines that do not have a native ability to boot from the network, I
    try booting from a RIS (Remote Installation Services) Boot Floppy and
    I get a message to say that the facility to remote boot is not
    supported by the NIC.

    Is that the same issue or two different issues? In other words, is
    the initial network boot ability determined by the BIOS only, and the
    secondard remote boot ability via floppy disk determined by the NIC?
    Obviously the PC will *boot* from the floppy (assuming all is well),
    but the next step is remote installation of the OS which is where it
    fails at that point.

    Thanks for the info!

    Alan.
    --

    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address.

    The following is a (probably!) totally unique
    and meaningless string of characters that you
    can use to find posts by me in a search engine:

    ewygchvboocno43vb674b6nq46tvb
     
    Alan, Jul 6, 2006
    #4
  5. Alan

    Alan Guest


    Hi Jasen,

    I am quite possibly mixing up two separate things here, but for some
    machines that do not have a native ability to boot from the network, I
    try booting from a RIS (Remote Installation Services) Boot Floppy and
    I get a message to say that the facility to remote boot is not
    supported by the NIC.

    Is that the same issue or two different issues? In other words, is
    the initial network boot ability determined by the BIOS only, and the
    secondard remote boot ability via floppy disk determined by the NIC?
    Obviously the PC will *boot* from the floppy (assuming all is well),
    but the next step is remote installation of the OS which is where it
    fails at that point.

    Thanks for the info!

    Alan.

    --

    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address.

    The following is a (probably!) totally unique
    and meaningless string of characters that you
    can use to find posts by me in a search engine:

    ewygchvboocno43vb674b6nq46tvb
     
    Alan, Jul 7, 2006
    #5
  6. If the machine will boot from a floppy, then you could set up a floppy
    containing a network boot loader. I did a google and came up with
    something called Nilo <http://www.nilo.org/>.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jul 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Hi Lawrence,

    Thanks for your reply. I guess that, upon refelction, I am mixing up
    to totally different things.

    1) Ability to natively boot from the network LAN connection (which
    from other posters appears to be a BIOS issue)

    2) Ability to 'pretend' to boot from the LAN when the machine is
    already bootstrapped from a floppy disk. This must now be a NIC issue
    since the BIOS is out of the way?

    Thanks,

    Alan.
    --

    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address.

    The following is a (probably!) totally unique
    and meaningless string of characters that you
    can use to find posts by me in a search engine:

    ewygchvboocno43vb674b6nq46tvb
     
    Alan, Jul 10, 2006
    #7
  8. Alan

    jasen Guest

    a NIC and/or contents ov floppy issue
     
    jasen, Jul 10, 2006
    #8
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