how did my router get this ip address?

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Serenity, May 15, 2004.

  1. Serenity

    Serenity Guest

    I have an access point on my network that sees my NAT router
    (according to its mac address) as having IP address 213.48.102.216.
    When I visit a site that reveals my WAN IP address, this is not it.
    Whois reveals 213.48.102.216 to be some site in the UK. I am in the
    US. What's going on???
     
    Serenity, May 15, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Serenity

    Serenity Guest

    Now the IP address is 217.83.81.14, which whois reveals as someplace in Germany.
     
    Serenity, May 15, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Serenity

    Serenity Guest

    Now 66.50.193.142 in Puerto Rico
     
    Serenity, May 15, 2004
    #3
  4. Are you connecting to an ISP that uses some exotic proxy cache
    arrangement that has the effect of changing this?

    The remote site can only see the IP number of packets that arrive at
    its interface. If these packets come from a rotating pool of addresses
    which actually belong to the caches rather than your endpoint, the
    remote site may be confused.

    This is particularly irritating if the remote site sells subscriptions
    to IP numbers, as some sceintific joiurnals used to.
     
    Gordon Findlay, May 15, 2004
    #4
  5. Serenity

    Serenity Guest

    My WAN ip address is something like this:
    http://www.whois.sc/24.238.251.99
    That is the ip address the world sees for my router. My access point,
    which sits inside my LAN, sees my laptop and the router as "attached
    devices". According to the access point, my laptop's ip is
    192.168.0.x, while my router's ip address has been all funky (as my
    access point sees it anyway). Maybe this is normal, and the router's
    ip address from the LAN side changes according to where I am surfing?
    Maybe this isn't a security thing after all...
     
    Serenity, May 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Serenity

    Jim Watt Guest

    The WAN side IP is allocated to the router dynamically
    by your service provider, usually from a pool of addresses
    that are allocated to them.

    Most of the time it does not matter what address they give
    you.
     
    Jim Watt, May 16, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.