How can I connect with WiFi to a computer with ethernet only?

Discussion in 'Home Networking' started by Dave, Oct 17, 2009.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    In my house I have an ADSL modem with WiFi. I can connect my laptop to that ok,
    with no problems.

    I have a small rackmount server that I'd like to stick in my garage, as it is
    noisy. The problem is I don't know what I need on the server to connect it to my
    ADSL modem. The only usable connection on this machine will be via ethernet.
    Forget about USB, as no wireless cards will have drivers for Sun's Solaris. In
    any case, I'm not even sure if it has USB on it. (not near me to check).

    Security is not an issue - any communication between me and the server will be
    via encrypted SSH. Using a power line device is out of the question, as my house
    has a 3-phase supply, and the garage is on a different phase to the house.

    I do not believe a wireless access point will solve this, but am I mistaken? I
    have one of those sitting around, which I used when my old modem did not have
    WiFi. But now it is redundant.

    Is it an Ethernet bridge, or similar I need?

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    Dave, Oct 17, 2009
    #1
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  2. Dave

    Dave Guest

    I should have said, there is a second machine I want to put in the garage too.
    That is a Unix workstation running HP-UX as the operating system. Can I link
    these two machine via a switch, then connect that switch to a wiress device so I
    can connect to the ADSL modem?

    Looking on the web, it seems a Wireless Ethernet Bridge may be what I need. Do I
    need two of these, or will the fact my ADSL modem has WiFi mean I only need one?



    --
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    Dave, Oct 17, 2009
    #2
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  3. Dave

    Rob Morley Guest

    You answered your own question. :)
    Just the one, with a switch to connect multiple hosts.
     
    Rob Morley, Oct 18, 2009
    #3
  4. Dave

    John Weston Guest

    Why not do the job correctly and use wired Ethernet with GB switches?
    That way, you can install GB Ethernet for your LAN that will be immune
    from most interference that may be present in your garage or from
    neighbour's wireless systems. A similar set-up works well here. (Server,
    2-3 computers, wired router for the WAN and an old router as wireless
    access point when needed)

    I've found Wireless to be less than acceptable when going through some
    types of exterior (and some interior) wall construction. Furnace ash
    breeze blocks or aluminium foil are excellent for blocking transmission
    of 2.5 or 5Gbps wireless signals...
     
    John Weston, Oct 18, 2009
    #4
  5. Be aware that many wireless access points can be configured to act as a
    bridge, and most incorporate a switch. Worth checking the documentation
    for the one you have already.

    A quick Google suggests there may be solaris drivers available for some
    cards. It's decades since I worked on Solaris so I'm not in a good
    position to judge how useful these might be though!

    A cable is always faster and more reliable...



    Phil, London
     
    Philip Herlihy, Oct 18, 2009
    #5
  6. Dave

    Dave Guest


    I do actually have Ethernet going into the garage, but not in the part I need
    it. I've a pretty large garage, consisting of places for two cars, then there
    are two rooms at the end. The freezer sits in one, the washing machine and sink
    in another. Part of the reason for mounting one of the computers in the garage
    is to raise the temperature a bit, so pipes do not freeze. I really would be
    difficult to get a cable into the room where the pipes are.

    Not only that, but I think my wife would object to me running more cables down
    the walls.
    I will try my laptop in the exact location first. I must admit, I'd not given
    that problem too much thought. I know the laptop works fine the same distance as
    the garage, but I've not really tried it inside.

    Ultimately, the main use of this will be for others to access the machines via
    my ADSL link. As such, the speed of the ADSL is likely to be the limiting
    factor, and not the WiFi.

    Being in a rural area, interference is not likely to be much of an issue. There
    is only one or at the very most two other WiFi networks within range.

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    Dave, Oct 18, 2009
    #6
  7. Wouldn't this http://tinyurl.com/yj5e4cy be a lot simpler?

    Tony
     
    Anthony R. Gold, Oct 18, 2009
    #7
  8. Dave

    Dave Guest

    I have a wall mounted heater fan heater and so called 'economy 7' storated
    heaters in the garage (I use oil for the main heating).

    But the point is heating like this is just wasted enerfy. If the computer needs
    to be on anyway, I might as well locate it in a place where it's heat output is
    useful.

    The two computer take around 430 W when idle, and probably 500 W + when doing
    CPU intensive things, which they often will do. Hence it makes sense to use the
    heat output.

    If all I wanted was a heater, I just just switch a computer on and not bother
    networking it at all.


    --
    I respectfully request that this message is not archived by companies as
    unscrupulous as 'Experts Exchange' . In case you are unaware,
    'Experts Exchange' take questions posted on the web and try to find
    idiots stupid enough to pay for the answers, which were posted freely
    by others. They are leeches.
     
    Dave, Oct 20, 2009
    #8
  9. I do not call the frugal application heat that is minimally sufficient to
    save my plumbing as "wasted".
    It would be more economical to put it in a place that will far more often
    benefit from the released heat - a place you need to keep warmer such as
    inside a home or a greenhouse, etc. Any day you need to run your central
    heating the computer will provide some modest base level of heat that you
    would need to provide from some paid-for energy source anyway.
    That would be more wasteful and also perhaps unsafe because a computer does
    not have the frost-stat that can put it on for just the minimum number if
    minutes needed in the small wee hours of a chilly February morning.

    Tony
     
    Anthony R. Gold, Oct 20, 2009
    #9
  10. Dave

    Dave Guest

    I've no greenhouse, but the problem in the home is that they make rooms
    unbearablly hot. I run 3 computers in the house

    * Sun Blade 2000, around 450 W. (Soon to be replaced by a Sun Ultra 27.)

    * HP C3600 around 350 W

    * Sun Ultra 60 (200 W), but soon to be replaced by a very noisy Sun netra T1
    using only 60 W.

    So that's 1,000 W running 24/7, which unless in a very large room, just makes it
    unbearably hot

    My wife would object if I started locating computers in other rooms in the house.

    The only downside to heating the garage is it will make it even more attractive
    to mice and other wildlife which use it in the winter.
    Yes agreed, but balancing all issues, I think moving one or two computers to the
    garage is sensible. It will reduce noise (a constant irritation for my wife) and
    heat output.

    --
    I respectfully request that this message is not archived by companies as
    unscrupulous as 'Experts Exchange' . In case you are unaware,
    'Experts Exchange' take questions posted on the web and try to find
    idiots stupid enough to pay for the answers, which were posted freely
    by others. They are leeches.
     
    Dave, Oct 22, 2009
    #10
  11. Dave

    Jon Guest

    Yes, a bridge can receive your wifi and "output" via ethernet.
     
    Jon, Oct 27, 2009
    #11
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