hear ye, hear ye.help is needed.......

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by estella aguilar, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. estella aguilar

    ASAAR Guest

    So why can't you find a tactful way to say that? You could, for
    instance, instead of suggesting which lens to use, suggest which
    ones (if there will only be one used) should be avoided. Then point
    out the benefits of preparation, lighting, posing, practice,
    practice and more practice. If the poster is incapable of
    understanding why following your advice would allow them to produce
    better results than simply buying a nice lens, that's not your
    problem. You'd have tried. But if a few follow your advice, that
    should make your efforts worthwhile, even if not everyone follows
    it. I can understand that not everyone gets satisfaction from
    helping others. Then it would make sense for them to ignore
    requests for assistance. What I don't understand is your attitude,
    that assumes that you'd be wasting your time giving useful answers
    (which can be to questions that weren't asked), so you instead
    provide insulting quips, wasting everyone's time, including your
    own. If you know half as much about wedding photography as you let
    on, your posts could be more valuable in the ng than most. Just
    having lots of knowledge of wedding photography isn't sufficient to
    confer much respect. What you do with it, or how you dispense it
    does.
     
    ASAAR, Aug 29, 2006
    #41
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  2. estella aguilar

    friesian Guest

    Exactly. I have some great gear, including some nice L lenses. And I
    know how to shoot action in low light without flash, so I can handle a
    dark church with no problem without being too annoying.

    BUT! I am not a wedding photographer. I photograph animals. So, when
    my brother asked me to photograph his wedding, I suggested he look for
    somebody who specialized in weddings.

    He begged me, and I did some looking online. There are a lot of
    expected photos in a wedding shoot, and a professional wedding
    photographer knows what they need to capture, where they need to be,
    etc.These are supposed to be very special photos, something they will
    cherish all their lives. It is just not something a beginner should
    risk.

    I can tell you from experience that I made a lot of mistakes during my
    first couple years. Not having enough of the right film on hand for the
    job (the wrong film did not turn out well). Having a camera break with
    the backup sitting at home. After switching to digital, I had my
    largest memory card crap out after 45 photos. I had to switchout of RAW
    format to be able to continue shooting. I was still limited on memoery,
    so I had to keep looking and deleting files as the day went on.

    It is very stressful when something like this happens, and you have to
    deal with it on the spot or realize that you just lost business and
    hurt your reputation. Much better to make these mistakes at events
    where you are practicing. Then nobody knows you had a problem except
    you.

    These are things that everybody has to go through. And then you can be
    prepared fro them. After my camera broke at a practice show, I never
    went anywhere without a backup. A couple years later, I was at a horse
    show, and I went to photograph the first horse. It wouldn't fire. Same
    with the second horse. It had worked fine the week before. I had no
    idea what was wrong. I switched the lens to my other camera and shot
    the rest of the show with no problem. Got home from the show and sent
    my camera in for repair. The shutter needed to be replaced. Had I not
    had an extra camera, I would have failed the whole show, looked bad to
    all the exhibitors, and I would have wasted my time and money which
    included a 4 hour drive each way and 2 nights in a hotel.

    A professional photographer knows their limits, and they don't accept
    jobs they aren't ready for. They know their gear, how it works in
    different situations, and they practice.

    A wedding is very challenging, You are dealing with a bunch of people,
    many under stress to get everything perfect. The lighting is often
    horrible. You need to be able to setup the group photos in a good
    location and be able to direct them to do what you want. That includes
    getting the shy people to not hide, and making sure that nobody in the
    back row blends into the background.

    And for the actual wedding, you want to get the right angles and
    special photos without being in the way or bothersome.

    Somebody considering wedding photography should really be looking for
    a mentor, not asking the counter guy at Ritz which lens he should buy.
     
    friesian, Aug 30, 2006
    #42
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  3. estella aguilar

    friesian Guest

    It sounds like you have never photographed a wedding.

    Do you have a list of the photos you need to take - the special ones
    that your clients are expecting to get?

    Have you been to the location yet to check out the lighting? If it is a
    church, it is often really bad lighting for photos.

    Do you have a flash that can be used off-camera? The ceilings are often
    too high to bounce the flash, and you will have red-eye if the flash is
    on camera.

    If you are planning to go without flash, how fast is that lens you are
    buying? Is it an f/2.8? That would get you by. Anything slower will be
    very difficult to work with. Faster would be better, but I doubt you
    have that if you are buying this lens.

    Can your camera do RAW mode? Do you have Photoshop CS to process the
    images?

    Do you have enough memory cards to take a ton more photos than you
    expect to? You will never be able to reshoot this, so you will need to
    get all the right shots the first time.

    Do you have backups of everything? Extra batteries, extra cards (if one
    fails, or you shoot more than you expect), backup body (never know when
    one will fail).

    Keep in mind that a wedding is a very special event, and if you miss
    the special shot, or something goes wrong with the photos, these people
    will hate you. And your repuatation will start off bad. Weddings are a
    lot more complicated than people think, and very easy to mess up.

    Check out this link (or do a keyword search for "Amateur Wedding
    Photography FAQ"

    The post is written by Karen Simmons and is an excellent guide to a
    beginning wedding photographer. I read this guide when my brother asked
    me to photograph his wedding. I read the guide and suggested my brother
    hire a professional.

    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....photography+guide+run&rnum=6#1ee594cc4c82d88c
     
    friesian, Aug 30, 2006
    #43
  4. stace, thank God for nice people like you hope we can keep in touch. its kind
    of difficult to try to work around negativety. maybe we can do email address
    instead if posiible email me. thanks for being so kind.
    Estella
     
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Aug 30, 2006
    #44
  5.  
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Aug 31, 2006
    #45
  6.  
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Aug 31, 2006
    #46
  7. hey stace, its estella again. just a brief message. are you using all sigma
    lenses? you mentioned a 28-200mm telephoto,70-300mm telephoto.im new to this
    site is there a gallery of your photos posted
     
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Aug 31, 2006
    #47
  8. Wanna know how many amateurs I've seen through the years ruin a
    couple's once-in-a-lifetime experience? I wonder what kind of lenses
    they used.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 31, 2006
    #48
  9. estella aguilar

    Peter Irwin Guest

    The only thing you could plausibly do which could usefully
    supplement the work of the pro photographer is to take
    candids without flash. You will want something like
    a 35mm f/2.0 lens or perhaps the 28mm f/2.8 for your 350D
    and to use a high ISO setting. Do some practice with
    friends and family under similar lighting.

    You may be able to do better pictures of this sort than
    a pro can if you have the advantage of knowing the
    people you are photographing.

    Peter.
     
    Peter Irwin, Aug 31, 2006
    #49
  10. estella aguilar

    friesian Guest

    Two co-workers of mine got married a few years ago (to each other).
    They were very upset when they found out the photographer had not put
    film in the camera. They paid the guy $500, and he must have thought a
    wedding only took one roll of film, since he didn't realize his mistake
    until it was over.

    So, they got no photos at all, and a huge hassle in getting their money
    back. Those photos cannot be redone. Sure, they can pay to get dressed
    up again, but even staged photos won't be the real thing.
     
    friesian, Aug 31, 2006
    #50
  11. Yeah, but what kind of lens did the guy use? Was it a Sigma? I've heard
    they're pretty good.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Aug 31, 2006
    #51
  12. estella aguilar

    Roy G Guest

    Hi.

    I have been reading this thread with a lot of interest and some amusement.
    A lot of it is a constantly recurring theme.

    First off, an Amateur does not make a living from Photography, and most of
    the time does not make anything from photography. Amateur does not describe
    competance, neither does Professional.

    Weddings are very special events. No-one should agree to be the principle
    photographer unless they are a very competant technician, and can control
    all of their equipment without having to use any time thinking about that
    equipment.

    All of their thinking time needs to be applied to setting up the subjects to
    ensure good PICTURES.

    A Professional Photographer has an image to maintain, as a Professional, and
    would probably never want to be seen using anything that looks like Amateur
    Equipment.

    So Sigma lenses can almost certainly be ruled out, as can Cameras like
    Digital Rebels and D70s, because the cost of the equipment is important to
    the image of being a Professional, as well as being more reliable in heavy
    use. Back ups for every single piece of gear is absolutely essential.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Aug 31, 2006
    #52
  13. hi Roy good morning. yes im interested in wedding photography. it takes alot
    of practice.i dont plan to ruin anybodys special day though i have a few
    practice shoots with a couple of assosciates. yes, they will have a
    professional photographer to attend thier wedding.yhanks for the thought. if
    there is anything else you can help me with i opened to all opinions. thanks
     
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Aug 31, 2006
    #53
  14.  
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Aug 31, 2006
    #54
  15. estella aguilar

    Bill K Guest

    Estella, be careful of Roy. He's an old grouch and canny Scotsman to
    boot.
     
    Bill K, Aug 31, 2006
    #55
  16. thanks for the warning. anyways what kind of photography do you do?
     
    estella aguilar via PhotoKB.com, Sep 1, 2006
    #56
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