Hard Drives......IDE and EIDE

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Chuck S, Oct 15, 2003.

  1. Chuck S

    Chuck S Guest

    Looking to upgrade my hard drive and wanted to ask....... my motherboard
    spec's say · "IDE - 2 Dual channel master mode PCI supporting four Enhanced
    IDE devices - Transfer rate up to 33MB/sec to cover PIO mode 4, multi-word
    DMA mode 2 drives, and UltraDMA-33 interface and increased reliability
    using - - UltraDMA-66/100 transfer protocols · Audio: VIA audio with AC 97
    compliant CODEC"

    Most hard drives I have looked at are EIDE hard drives. Are EIDE hard drives
    the same as IDE hard drive as what my motherboard says it takes. And does
    anyone out there have any suggestions on a good trouble free hard drive in
    the 120 gb rage I should look at.
     
    Chuck S, Oct 15, 2003
    #1
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  2. X-No-Archive: Yes

    In Chuck S <> typed
    || Looking to upgrade my hard drive and wanted to ask....... my
    || motherboard spec's say · "IDE - 2 Dual channel master mode PCI
    || supporting four Enhanced IDE devices - Transfer rate up to 33MB/sec
    || to cover PIO mode 4, multi-word DMA mode 2 drives, and UltraDMA-33
    || interface and increased reliability using - - UltraDMA-66/100
    || transfer protocols · Audio: VIA audio with AC 97 compliant CODEC"
    ||
    || Most hard drives I have looked at are EIDE hard drives. Are EIDE
    || hard drives the same as IDE hard drive as what my motherboard says
    || it takes. And does anyone out there have any suggestions on a good
    || trouble free hard drive in the 120 gb rage I should look at.

    IDE = Itegrated Drive Electronics
    EIDE = Enhanced IDE

    All IDE drive for many years are actually EIDE

    Another way of describing IDE is ATA or UDMA

    (AT = Advanced Technology)

    ATA = AT Attachment
    ATAPI = ATA Packet Interfact (for CDROMs - max 33MBps)
    DMA = Direct Memory Access
    UDMA = Ultra DMA

    These are all based on EIDE, they're basically different manufacturer's own
    method.
     
    Robert de Brus, Oct 16, 2003
    #2
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  3.  
    adelineguerpin, Oct 16, 2003
    #3
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