Getting that film look

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Scott W, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. Scott W

    Guest Guest

    Some good points and I am one who uses both although I do not own a good
    DSLR as renting is fine when needed but I must state that in most circles
    you would be hard pressed to find the average Digital user saying
    anything nice about film or manual cameras. It is akin to penis extension
    and defending oversized cars. No logic but a lot of hocus pocus. Kindness
    and open minds are rare.
     
    Guest, Jan 13, 2006
    1. Advertisements

  2. Scott W

    no_name Guest

    Or perhaps a "master photographer" using a "comparable digital camera".

    What produces the *better* image is the *better VISION* of the
    photographer making the image. The rest of it is just tools.
     
    no_name, Jan 13, 2006
    1. Advertisements

  3. Chris wrote on Fri, 13 Jan 2006 17:40:15 +0100:

    ??>> At present, a camera like the 5D competes
    ??>> with MF (645) but LF film + a good scan is
    ??>> still in another league altogether.

    CL> But what digital fans never manage to explain is *how* a
    CL> 5D, for example, with a kit zoom lens can be better than a
    CL> good film camera with a first-rate prime lens.

    As the number of film cameras declines, I suspect the price of
    film will go up and the selection will decrease. Getting the
    "look" may well become expensive.

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland.
     
    James Silverton, Jan 13, 2006
  4. Scott W

    Bill Funk Guest

    Who's saying that?
     
    Bill Funk, Jan 13, 2006
  5. Scott W

    Guest Guest

    Most film cameras that are pro level will last quite some time. If you
    are a good shooter it will not really be that expensive to use film. My
    wife can get 10 very nice shots out of a roll of 36. She does it all the
    time and blows me and my friends away. She's only been a serious shooter
    for around 3 years. Damn.
     
    Guest, Jan 13, 2006
  6. Scott W

    Lorem Ipsum Guest

    Let's see - Just in the past twelve months, Nikon quit making lenses for the
    enlarger, MF and LF market, and all but one of their 35mm cameras.
    Hasselblad has quit making their film cameras. Kodak has quit the photo
    paper business, and is quitting B& film (and color is made in China). Agfa
    quit making film. Ilford is 'iffy'. I buy my film from Croatia (of all
    places). Jobo has terminated. Next? Enlargers going, going... then
    Rodenstock will flip out, Linhof will quit their Technika series. Calumet is
    already diminishing in all but big cities.

    Doesn't look too good, does it?
     
    Lorem Ipsum, Jan 13, 2006
  7. Scott W

    Guest Guest

    Let's see - Just in the past twelve months, Nikon quit making lenses for the
    enlarger, MF and LF market, and all but one of their 35mm cameras.
    Hasselblad has quit making their film cameras. Kodak has quit the photo
    paper business, and is quitting B& film (and color is made in China). Agfa
    quit making film. Ilford is 'iffy'. I buy my film from Croatia (of all
    places). Jobo has terminated. Next? Enlargers going, going... then
    Rodenstock will flip out, Linhof will quit their Technika series. Calumet is
    already diminishing in all but big cities.

    Doesn't look too good, does it?
    [/QUOTE]
    Depends. I could care less about Nikon when you get down to it. My F will
    most likely work for 20 more years and the same for my old Spotty. Fugi
    has new films coming out in Italy and Germany so screw the states, I
    don't care. There will be plenty of film for those who want to use it
    which is mostly outside the US but the US will have a lot bigger problems
    than that to deal with in the coming years and not much film will pail in
    comparison. There will always be sources just as there is for small
    cinematographers who use 8mm an 16mm. It was pronounced dead years ago
    but my friends in Austin have no trouble getting as much as they want.

    So, doesn't look good for who? Me in Italy or when I am in the states?
    Just one more reason to spend more time in Italy. My nearby shop in Italy
    is stocked to the max. In a few years maybe that will change but it has
    been a roller coaster ride for many things in my biz of music and the
    good come back or just never really leave.
     
    Guest, Jan 13, 2006
  8. wrote on Fri, 13 Jan 2006 22:04:44
    GMT:
    the main points <<<<<

    ??>>> Most film cameras that are pro level will last ??>>> time.
    ??>>
    ??>> Doesn't look too good, does it?
    ??>>
    p> Depends. I could care less about Nikon when you get down to
    p> it. My F will most likely work for 20 more years and the
    p

    These are all valid points but I reiterate that I think the
    price and variety of film is the main concern even if well-made
    cameras last. The price of film must inevitably rise as the
    demand decreases.

    James Silverton.
    Potomac, Maryland.
     
    James Silverton, Jan 13, 2006
  9. If he's talking about _35mm_ film, I certainly am. The "kit" lens on the 5D
    is the 24-105, which is a flipping amazing lens in terms of sharpness (light
    falloff at 24mm is problematic, though).

    That particular lens is a tad heavy and pricey for my tastes, but the
    28-75/2.8 Tamron produce excellent images at f/8 on the 5D.

    At 12x18 and larger, 35mm film isn't even close to the 5D. It's not the
    lenses that are the problem, it's the film.

    Of course, if you like grainy mushy images, as 35mm users seem to, you can
    always blur and add noise to your digital images.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Jan 13, 2006
  10. Scott W

    Guest Guest

    I agree and I was not trying to say you were wrong here. It will rise but
    so will everything really. It will not be out of reach for a serious
    shooter. Someone like myself will help good shooters I know who may have
    a hard time affording film but they can't afford digital either. I
    finished a fully analog recording a few months back and even with high
    tape costs it cost the band less than them on there own with a digital
    home set up. All I did was make them practice more, smoke less and hit it
    hard when the tape was rolling. The point is if I need to think more
    about taking the shot to save on film so be it. I can even shoot some
    digital samples first to check out composition. The best of both worlds.
     
    Guest, Jan 13, 2006
  11. Scott W

    rafe b Guest


    Indeed.

    I sometimes visit a "new" photo venue with the DSLR
    or Nikon FE first. If there are promising compositions,
    I'm likely to return with my MF and/or LF gear.

    And if not, I've saved myself some needless schlepping.

    I suspect 35 mm film will be with us for a few more
    years, though it will get harder to find and more expensive.


    rafe b
    www.terrapinphoto.com
     
    rafe b, Jan 13, 2006
  12. Scott W

    Guest Guest

    No, doubt it will get more expensive but not really harder to find by
    mail order. When in the states I purchase most of my film from NY mail
    order houses anyway. Although I have been having fun with 99 cent store
    stuff for converting to B&W. Also, eventually digital will get better or
    as someone else mentioned, maybe you, continuous stream developmentts
    will help. Film will be around long enough for what digital is today to
    be total thrift store junk and maybe we will all be happy. We still need
    some way for artistic shooters to prove they have not overdone
    manipulation prior to submitting photos.
     
    Guest, Jan 13, 2006
  13. The 35mm format is shared with motion picture film and
    microfilm, but those markets too shall pass. It is
    still possible to get double-8mm film, I believe.
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Jan 14, 2006
  14. Scott W

    rafe b Guest


    I think for the Average Joe and Jill, and without being
    condescending, digital has tremendous advantages --
    and yes, some pitfalls (like media disasters) which
    will bite him in the ass, just like they've bitten me.

    A.J. gets to see his pix right away, without waiting
    for the next major holiday to finish the roll.

    A.J. gets his image with acceptable quality,
    even in low light.

    A.J. gets to see her pix on a big bright screen,
    and email them to friends and family.

    Overall, it's working very well for A.J. and this
    is what the market shows.

    Me, personally: the DSLR is what comes with
    me on vacation, where the primary goal is plain
    old rest & relaxation. The G2 is what I take on
    hikes, where weight is more of a concern.

    Film is what I use when photography is the
    feature event.


    rafe b
    www.terrapinphoto.com
     
    rafe b, Jan 14, 2006
  15. Scott W

    Peter Irwin Guest

    Double-8 is just 16mm film with extra perforations.
    Kodak stopped selling single rolls some time ago, but
    there are people who order large quantities from Kodak
    to resell.

    I don't think microfilm is going to die anytime soon.
    Micrographic records require much less in the way of
    maintenance than computer storage. I think it will
    take a generation before archivists are going to start
    trusting computer storage.

    AFAIK Afga's micrographic, cine, medical and aerial photographic
    materials business are still part of the main company and
    were not sold to AgfaPhoto. I don't know if there were
    shared manufacturing facilities, but it will be interesting
    to see what happens to those products in the coming years.

    Peter.
     
    Peter Irwin, Jan 14, 2006
  16. Scott W

    dj_nme Guest

    Quite a few "big" movies have been "filmed" using digital cameras recently.
    The days of 35mm movie cameras may well be numbered as well.
    So, you may not be able to look at the movie industry to keep 35mm film
    alive...
     
    dj_nme, Jan 14, 2006
  17. Scott W

    Guest Guest

    This is true but some if not many will want to use film stock for various
    reasons but it will get expensive for small producers. Gee, just think,
    soon Joe average will move from Stupidest Home Videos to Full Feature
    Movies and then it will truly suck as bad as the Pop music biz does. I
    can't wait. "Give me that button Danny, give it to me now!" Danny: "But
    you forgot to email everyone that you were going to push the button!" ME:
    Give me that f#$%ing button man!"
     
    Guest, Jan 14, 2006
  18. Scott W

    no_name Guest

    I don't think it's going to get that much more expensive. Price goes up
    and they lose MORE market.
     
    no_name, Jan 14, 2006
  19. Scott W

    Paul Rubin Guest

    Film has always been expensive for small producers and in recent
    years, many if not most low-budget indie films have been shot on
    digital video (either high definition or just regular DV). Remember
    how much you spent on a 24 exp film with processing, and then imagine
    shooting that many frames film every second (even half-frame 35mm).
    However, big-budget studios using video instead of film is still
    fairly unusual. Star Wars Episode 2(?) was the first really high
    profile example. I'd be interested to know what other big films are
    using digitalnow.
     
    Paul Rubin, Jan 14, 2006
  20. Scott W

    Tony Cooper Guest

    A bit of a side issue, but this bit about digital cameras lowering the
    cost of photography because neither film nor processing is involved
    doesn't take into account the cost of cameras. Plural.

    I have 35mm bodies and lenses that are decades old and still usable.
    If something does go wrong, the body is almost always repairable.

    In just three years I've gone through three digital cameras. Digitals
    are just not repairable. With the possible exception of corroded
    contacts, a wonky digital has to be trashed and replaced.

    I sent a dropped Nikon into Nikon service and was quoted a repair
    price that was almost the original price of the camera. Since the
    price-per-feature of cameras had dropped, it made more sense to
    abandon the camera and buy a new one. Same bucks; more bells and
    whistles.

    The high volume user may come out better by-the-shot, but not the
    Average Joe.
     
    Tony Cooper, Jan 14, 2006
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.