Frame Relay traffic shaping

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by jmarkotic, Dec 11, 2003.

  1. jmarkotic

    jmarkotic Guest

    Hi,
    let's assume this scenario. Central location is connected to FR netowrk with
    port speed 2Mbps. And remote location is connected with port speed of
    64kbps. CIR between them is 32kbps.
    This is exact case for FR traffic shaping so central location will not
    overwhalm remote location with burst of data.
    In cisco book (CCIE practical studies, 2 examples), I read that for mincir
    value I need to put real CIR (32kbps) and for CIR parameter I need to put
    local port speed (in this case 2Mbps).
    In this case it should look like:
    frame-relay cir 2000000
    frame-relay mincir 32000
    Isn't this wrong ?
    What would be the point of this. With this config, central location will
    send data as fast as it can and will definitely overvhalm remote location
    with data.

    Shouldn't I put port speed of remote location for cir (64kbps).
    frame-relay cir 64000
    frame-relay mincir 32000

    thanks,
    jura
     
    jmarkotic, Dec 11, 2003
    #1
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  2. You have it correct, use the circuit speed of the remote port as the cir and
    the pvc speed for the mincir.

    Mike
     
    Mike Gallagher, Dec 11, 2003
    #2
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  3. For your scenario, yes. The goal here is to try to get more than you paid
    for. Pace at mincir, but try to burst up to CIR.

    See http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/125/traffic_shaping_6151.html. You
    want CIR to be the access rate of the remote (or the link with the slowest
    access rate), and MINCIR to be the telco CIR. It never makes sense to try
    to burst over access rate.
     
    Phillip Remaker, Dec 11, 2003
    #3
  4. jmarkotic

    jmarkotic Guest

    For your scenario, yes. The goal here is to try to get more than you
    paid
    Thanks for the document that sums it up. Although I have collected several
    cisco documents that has some different opinions about FR TS.
    thanks,
    j
     
    jmarkotic, Dec 11, 2003
    #4
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