First Foray into Photoshop

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005.

  1. Up until recently I've been staying away from Photoshop mostly because I
    just don't have time to get over the learning curve but yesterday I took the
    day off and played around with it a bit.

    My goal was to remove the typical teen age blemishes yet keep the photo from
    looking "photoshopped"
    I know this is really basic stuff but I'd love some comments/suggestions on
    the outcome.

    Before
    http://www.pbase.com/rkircher/image/50316725

    After
    http://www.pbase.com/rkircher/image/50319342

    How did I do?
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Mike Warren Guest

    I think it's a little overdone but nowhere near as bad as my
    first attempts.

    Why didn't you choose a more interesting pose?

    -Mike
     
    Mike Warren, Oct 6, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. "A disturbing new study finds that studies are disturbing"
    Thanks Mike,

    Do you think it's a bit too soft? The first one I did was way too soft and
    very obviously fixed up. This is the one I thought looked less worked on.

    Since I wanted to work on clear up the face I picked one that had more
    blemishes and red splotches.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #3
  4. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    b.ingraham Guest

    Great job as far as I'm concerned. It took me about six weeks to learn
    how to get to this stage with Photoshop.

    Overdone, Mike? In what way? And a more interesting pose? This is just
    one of an infinite variety of "poses." I'm not even sure it was
    "posed," if by pose you refer to conscious direction of the subject by
    the photographer. It looks candid to me. And there is little to quibble
    with about the framing. It's tight, a large aperture guaranteed a
    blurred background, I would remove that light arc across from the nose,
    at the left, and perhaps darken the light area above the arm, but as
    far as I'm concerned this is a nice photo. This rates an "A" in my
    book.

    Bob
     
    b.ingraham, Oct 6, 2005
    #4
  5. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Mike Warren Guest

    Yes. Some places like the eyebrow and lips seem too soft.

    I made the same mistake and I was trying for a reasonably
    strong effect. :)

    As well as the clone brush, did you use the technique of
    creating a blurred copy and using a mask to paint the blur?

    If you have CS2 the spot healing brush on a new layer is good for
    removing the blemishes without softening the picture.

    And you can fade the effect if needed. I now do several layers
    of healing for different areas so I can set the opacity separately

    Please bear in mind that IMHO it is only *slightly* overdone.

    -Mike
     
    Mike Warren, Oct 6, 2005
    #5

  6. Thanks Bob, yes it was a candid shot taken just this past weekend. If you
    have/had a teen or are associated with teens you know that it's not easy to
    get pics of them let alone posed pics. As soon as she heard the shutter go
    off she gave me one of those classic teen aged scowls. ;-)

    Anyway, thanks for the comments and I'll look into removing the arc across
    from her nose. Again I was really concentrating on the face and clean up
    techniques over the rest of the shot but I'll take a second look at it.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #6
  7. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    bob Guest

    Comparing the two, it's obvious, but if I just saw the 2nd, it wouldn't
    jump out at me. There is evidence of the manipulation at the hairline and
    near the nose.

    Another approach you might want to try is using the dodge tool to lighten
    the areas, which preserves the texture of the skin.

    Bob
     
    bob, Oct 6, 2005
    #7
  8. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Jeremy Guest

    Katrin Eismann has authored the classic work on Photoshop Retouching, and it
    is available at a discount on Amazon. The third edition, covering the
    latest release of Photoshop, is due out in the next few weeks. The entire
    book is oriented toward photo restoration and advanced image retouching.
    Anyone interested in improving their retouching skills would be well advised
    to get their hands on Eismann's books.
     
    Jeremy, Oct 6, 2005
    #8
  9. First, all opinions are greatly appreciated, we all have our own preferences
    and its good to hear all sides.

    Second, I'm working with PS 7 right now. I have CS2 on order and it should
    arrive sometime next week.

    Basically, I used the clone tool to remove the more obvious blemishes and
    red marks. I also removed a chicken pox scar from near her eye and the ear
    ring hole. Then I created a second layer and used the Gaussian Blur to blur
    out that layer. Then I adjusted the opacity and fill of the blur layer to
    get the skin tone I wanted. Then I used the erase tool to remove the blurred
    layer from around the eye, lips, nostril and all of the hair. Lastly I used
    the erase tool again to get rid of the halo effect in the dark areas from
    the blurred layer. Mostly around the nose and front part of the chin.

    I've done some blur effects in the past mostly to enhance DoF but this is
    the first time I've attempted a clean up like this.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #9
  10. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    PanHandler Guest

    I think you did extremely well. I've never met anyone with perfect skin. For
    what you set out to do; i.e.. skin blemishes, it works very well. Has your
    subject seen the results?
     
    PanHandler, Oct 6, 2005
    #10
  11. No she hasn't seen the results yet. I was going to take any advice received
    here and try again and see if I can come up with anything better before I
    show here.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #11
  12. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    bob Guest

    Check out "layer masks." They're really cool. They let you do the same
    thing, except instead of erasing the image (on the extra layer), you paint
    on the mask. By using the mask, you can easily change your mind and put
    parts back in at will. You can also copy masks between layers -- like when
    you do the DOF thing, you might also want to darken the background. Just
    copy the mask and make a curves adjustment layer.

    You can use all the the paint tools, including gradients, on the mask

    Bob
     
    bob, Oct 6, 2005
    #12
  13. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    John Fryatt Guest

    I'm no PS expert, but I'd say you did pretty good. I find the face a
    little oversoftened, and it's kind of spread into the eyebrows and
    hairline, but not too badly. So, not bad at all.
     
    John Fryatt, Oct 6, 2005
    #13
  14. Technically, I think you did quite well. I tend to agree with Mike that
    it is perhaps a tad over the top, thorough enough to raise a suspicion
    that it actually is considerably retouched. I usually don't smooth out
    quite as much, and normally also leave some minor blemishes there, just
    to make it more realistic.

    But then there is this other issue. This is your teenage daughter,
    right? I don't know about her psychology, but with my daughter of a
    similar age, I'd show her the unretouched pic first, and let _her_
    decide how much retouching should be made - essentially by letting her
    complain about this or the other thing, and cheerfully replying, "Oh,
    but that can be fixed with a bit of Photoshop, if you like.".

    I'd be afraid that if I made such a thorough removal of every blemish,
    complete with a considerable smoothing out, obviously at my own
    initiative, I'd be sending the message "Daddy really would like you to
    look like this. Your actual face is far from making the cut".

    But your, or rather her, mileage might be very different.

    Jan Böhme
     
    =?iso-8859-1?B?SmFuIEL2aG1l?=, Oct 6, 2005
    #14
  15. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Cathy Guest

    Robert, I thought you did great. I just got a camera not long ago, and
    haven't gotten around to getting photo editing software, and don't know
    what is good or not good. But I like what you did.

    Cathy
     
    Cathy, Oct 6, 2005
    #15
  16. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Shawn Hirn Guest

    You did quite well, but the modified image looks a bit less sharp than
    the original image. How did you remove those blemishes and which
    Photoshop version did you use?
     
    Shawn Hirn, Oct 6, 2005
    #16
  17. I agree - retouching is generally done by request, this being one
    reason. Since you're working on photoshop skills (and mine are quite
    elementary), maybe it would be good to make the corrections on a layer so
    that you can increase/mute the smoothing as you wish. I can see that muting
    down the face texture and blemishes without making them disappear altogether
    would be 1) more realistic and 2) imply less to the subject. Fully
    airbrushing them out is really for magazine covers, or people already
    wearing makeup to achieve that effect.

    Dave
     
    David Geesaman, Oct 6, 2005
    #17
  18. Thanks...

    <copied from post above>
    Basically, I used the clone tool to remove the more obvious blemishes and
    red marks. I also removed a chicken pox scar from near her eye and the ear
    ring hole. Then I created a second layer and used the Gaussian Blur to blur
    out that layer. Then I adjusted the opacity and fill of the blur layer to
    get the skin tone I wanted. Then I used the erase tool to remove the blurred
    layer from around the eye, lips, nostril and all of the hair. Lastly I used
    the erase tool again to get rid of the halo effect in the dark areas from
    the blurred layer. Mostly around the nose and front part of the chin.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #18

  19. Thanks Bob, I'll check that out.
     
    Robert R Kircher, Jr., Oct 6, 2005
    #19
  20. Robert R Kircher, Jr.

    Steve Wolfe Guest

    No she hasn't seen the results yet. I was going to take any advice
    Unless she asked you to do it, you may not want to show her. If you do,
    it would be almost like saying "Gee, honey, this is how you COULD look...."

    steve
     
    Steve Wolfe, Oct 6, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.