Fear and loathing in the streets

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Eolake Stobblehouse, Dec 13, 2004.

  1. I intend to get back into street photography. But these are paranoid
    times. Are photographers accused of evil-doing all the time? If so, how
    does one handle it?
     
    Eolake Stobblehouse, Dec 13, 2004
    #1
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  2. Eolake Stobblehouse

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Walk softly and carry a big lens :)
     
    Phil Wheeler, Dec 13, 2004
    #2
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  3. Use a small, unpretentious-looking camera, not an SLR.

    It occurred to me that a Coolpix 990 would be ideal. It has the curious
    swiveling 2-part body. You can hold it in front of you and pretend to be
    reviewing stored pictures or making settings, and in fact be taking pictures
    of what's in front of you.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Dec 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Eolake Stobblehouse

    zeitgeist Guest

    have an assistant in a wedding dress, for some reason brides and their
    photographer's have amnesty from anti-photographer security guards and even
    those weird 'site license' permits that think any photog with a tripod
    should pay the same fees as a multimillion dollar hollywood movie
    production, including hiring an off duty policeman to stand around to make
    sure nobody trips on the pod.
     
    zeitgeist, Dec 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Eolake Stobblehouse

    Jer Guest


    Around here, I remind them I'm standing squarely inside the United
    States, and sans a warrant, they should pay a little less attention to
    my business and a little more attention to their own. If this isn't
    sufficient, I give them the phone number for Bekins Moving Co.
     
    Jer, Dec 13, 2004
    #5
  6. Eolake Stobblehouse

    Cliff Smith Guest

    Or a monopod. I find 2 feet of high-grade aluminium with a ball & socket on
    the end of it makes a surprisingly effective anti-mugging deterrant.

    Here's a cautionary tale. Shortly after the death of Princess Diana, I was
    in London with some colleagues for a trade show, and on the way back one of
    them suggested stopping at Buckingham Palace to take a few photos of the
    huge pile of flowers on the pavement outside the gate. We parked a few
    streets away and walked up to the palace, all of us carrying our camera
    bags.

    There was a large crowd of mourners outside the palace, and as soon as they
    saw us, someone yelled out "Bloody paparazzi! You killed her!" and threw a
    bottle at us. Several other people also shouted and threw things, and the
    situation was getting pretty ugly. We decided to beat a hasty retreat before
    we got lynched, and legged it back to the car. I really didn't fancy the
    idea of my head being stuck on a spike on the palace gates!

    The stupid thing is, we weren't paprazzi. We worked for a magazine
    publisher, mainly doing commercial and product photography, but try
    explaining that to an angry mob...
     
    Cliff Smith, Dec 13, 2004
    #6
  7. Eolake Stobblehouse

    Frank Vuotto Guest

    Where are the pictures ?


    On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 15:19:24 GMT, "Cliff Smith"
     
    Frank Vuotto, Dec 13, 2004
    #7

  8. Emotional humans are grossly irrational. And when they all have a
    shared emotion, they are irrational to the Nth degree.

    I figure if I ever wish to commit suicide, I'll walk up to a group of
    school kids and parents and ask one of the girls if I can photograph
    her nude... :)
     
    Eolake Stobblehouse, Dec 13, 2004
    #8
  9. Eolake Stobblehouse

    teflon Guest

    Did they throw the bottle before or after they laid a pink fluffy teddy at
    the gates? ;]
     
    teflon, Dec 13, 2004
    #9
  10. Eolake Stobblehouse

    Paul H. Guest

    The sad truth is that most street photographers ARE evil. Why? I don't
    know--it's just one of life's great mysteries, although I'd guess that
    "street photographers" are mentally in the same class as peeping-toms,
    voyeurs and all others who seek to fufill some twisted inner need by
    invading the privacy of strangers. Or maybe street photographers just like
    to profit from the misfortune of their fellow beings, all the while
    proclaiming it's "art" which drives them to rudely press lenses into the
    faces of passers-by and the homeless. Indeed, the fact that some people
    want to be "street photographers" says more about the hopeless degradation
    of humanity than do all of the images created by the former.

    But, please--do indulge yourself!

    Fear and loathing? I vote loathing. And stop calling me paranoid, just
    like all the other voices in my head!
     
    Paul H., Dec 14, 2004
    #10
  11. Woa.... dude... you make me sound like *journalist* or summin!
     
    Eolake Stobblehouse, Dec 15, 2004
    #11
  12. Michael A. Covington wrote:
    []
    Don't tell everyone - the 990s will sell out! Actually, the Nikon 4500 is
    still on sale in the UK.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 15, 2004
    #12
  13. I've got one, and the swivel is very nice. Most people expect to see a
    matchbox sized and shaped camera held up in front of the face. With the
    990, you can hold it waist level and look down with the lens pointing
    whatever way you want. Diane Arbus preferred using a TLR for just this
    advantage: people are more aware of you when you're looking at them, either
    directly or through a camera. How many times have we all looked at a waiter
    to catch their attention? (Well, it works _sometimes_.)

    On the other hand, doing street photography is something I've done for
    years for snapshots for our Web site, and no one has ever accosted me about
    it. I'm never furtive about it, and if people are clearly not interested, I
    don't persist.
     
    Phil Stripling, Dec 15, 2004
    #13
  14. Yes, or to the side. Which is exactly why I have just bought the new
    Nikon Coolpix 8400, which is unobtrusive, has the swivel monitor, *and*
    has a super-wideangle zoom.

    I have no wish to be super-covert, for people will react to somebody
    trying to hide as much as they will to somebody pushing a camera in
    their face. But I think one can be discreet without being 'covert'.
    Ones emotions have a lot to do with it.
     
    Eolake Stobblehouse, Dec 15, 2004
    #14
  15. Eolake Stobblehouse

    teflon Guest

    Yes, or to the side. Which is exactly why I have just bought the new
    Just don't show any!


    What was that film with those 'pods'?
     
    teflon, Dec 15, 2004
    #15
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